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February 07, 1975 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-07

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Friday, February 7, 1975,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

I

DAILY SPORTS ANALYSIS

Cager
By JEFF SCHILLER
Often a group of talented individuals
produces only mediocre team results.
Everyone speculates as to the cause:
some blame the coach, other lambaste
the 'prima donna' players, still others
claim the team's talent was overrated all
along.
Sometimes the reverse occurs. A team
with seemingly ordinary abilities 'puts it
all together' and becomes a consistent
winner.
Why does one aggregation succeed
where the other fails? The key is the
presence or absence of a genuine leader.
It n'iay be the team captains the most
talented player, or a 'sixth man' off the
bench, but every successful team has an
individual upon whom they rely in pres-
sure situations. A 'Mr. Clutch' if you will.
All this is by way of discussing the
reasons for the disappointing showing of
Michigan's basketball team in Big 10 play
this season. That the Wolverines miss
Campy Russell's 23 points and 11 rebounds
per game is obvious-that they miss his
leadership is becoming no less apparent.
I've never believed that one man makes
a team, and I still don't. When a team
loses a player as valuable as Russell,
though, they need to make some adjust-
ments. It's possible to make the necessary
changes, but everyone has to realize what
needs to be done.
The cagers clearly do not.
It's not that no one wants to take over

must

fin

leader

the leadership role. Quite the opposite,
C.J. Kupec's pre-season comment, "Now
that Campy's gone, the rest of us will
have to produce a little more," is echoed
by all. Everyone wants to pick the team
up and ignite a winning streak.
And that's just the problem. Though
it's not because of selfishness or petty
jealousy, Steve Grote, Joe Johnson, Way-
man Britt and Kupec have shown a de-
pressing tendency to try to 'do it all'
in crucial situations this season. Of
them, only Kupec has played up to
expectations.
Johnny Orr put his finger on the diffi-
culty after the first game against Indiana.
"I'll tell you where we miss Campy.
When we were beating Indiana 12-6, Buck-
ner ran past Benson and said, 'Big man,
get on those boards,' And Benson nodded.
They (Indiana's players) all respect
Buckner like that-just like everyone on
our club looked to Campanella last year.
But we just don't have anyone like that
this season."
At Michigan State, Minnesota and Pur-
due, Michigan staged late rallies to put
them within striking distance. Each time,
costly Wolverine miscues choked off their
rally.
In fact, Michigan's only come-from-
behind road win all season was the
double overtime victory at Illinois when
Grote, Johnson and John Robinson fouled
out.
This is not intended to demean any of

these players. But Kupec's post-game sug-
gestion that Michigan won the contest
because, ". . . we had more experience
in pressure situations" is only partially
true. The Wolverines won because their
three inexperienced players in the lineup
during the overtimes looked to Kupec and
Britt for leadership. And both responded
magnificently.
For a while, everyone deluded them-
selves into thinking that the situation
might actually be beneficial. In the
jubilant aftermath of the victory over
Tennessee, Joe Johnson exulted, "Last
year everyone in the arena knew that
Campy was taking the clutch shot. This
year even we don't know who's taking
it. It makes it tougher for the defense."
But defeat has dampened that spirit.
Against Wisconsin, Michigan's last second
offense was disorganized and unable to
get off a decent shot in either regulation
or overtime play. Had Wayman Britt not
been fouled in the process of attempting a
desparation last second shot, the Wol-
verine attack probably would have failed
to produce in both situations.
If the Wolverines are to make a serious
run for a post-season tournament berth,
someone must emerge in a leadership role.'
If no one comes forth, some will blame
the coach, others lambaste the 'prima
donna' players and still others will claim
the team's talent was overrated all along.

Big Ten
Standings

Indiana
Minnesota
Purdue
Michigan State
MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Iowa
Illinois
Wisconsin
Northwestern

W
10
7
7
6
5
S
4
3
1
1

L
0
3
3
4
5
5
6
7
8
8

Pct.
1.000
.700
.700
.600
.500
.500
.400
.300
.111
.111

SCORES
NBA
Atlanta ill, Detroit 98
I.C.-Omaha 95, Milwaukee 94
Cleveland 98, Portland 90
NHI
N.Y. Rangers 3, Philadelphia I
Boston 3, Minnesota 2
jN.Y. Islanders 2, Buffalo 2, tie
Women's basketball
Grand Valley 59, MICHIGAN 46
DR. PAUL USLAN
Optometrist
Full Contact Lens Service
Visual Examinatiors
548 Church 663-2476

PRESSURE'S ON AT COLORADO:

Icers

have

mRus

AP Photo
MICHIGAN'S STEVE GROTE has a pass batted down by Minnesota's Mike Thompson. Grote,
second-team all-Big Ten last year, has just been benched by Wolverine Coach Johnny Orr.
Orr cited defensive problems for the demotion (see story in Sports of the Daily, below).

44 IILn him,"IST

S- .,. ,..... t ........... ............. ..... ................ .....:f

Daily
II11I Sports
Grote out, Baxter t NIGHT EDITORS:
ou, FRED UPTON
ANDY GLAZER
Hoping to shake up his slumping team, coach Johnny Orr
announced yesterday a major shakeup in his starting lineup.
Dave Baxter will be starting at guard for the men's basketball
team Saturday against Michigan State, in the' place of Steve
Grote.
The coaches announced that Grote was being benched for I
defensive reasons. Grote has not shown the quickness this year
that characterized his play as a freshman. The coaches hope the
move will be temporary.
In addition to Baxter, guards Joe Johnson, forwards Way-
man Britt and John Robinson and center C.J. Kupec will
comprise the starting lineup against Michigan State.
Orr also announced that forward Rick White sprained an By MARCIA MERKER
ankle and is a doubtful participant in the MSU game. Forward Women's intercollegiate ath-
Len Lillard will be moved up from the Varsity Reserves to take letics are gradually growing
his place on the roster. within the United States. Un-

By FRED UPTON ,
The Michigan hockey team
plays an all-important two gamet
series at Colorado College to-I
night and tomorrow.1
Colorado's Tigers are current-,
ly in fifth place, four pointst
ahead of the Wolverines. If
Michigan has hopes of over-
taking Colorado and finishing inG
the top four playoff berths, they
must do well this weekend. t
"That's right," explained
Coach Dan Farrell, "We're still
in the running but we must
sweep Colorado this weekend.
We have to."'
The Wolverines swept Colo-I
rado the last time they were in
Ann Arbor, 8-5 and 7-3. At that;
point in time (Thanksgiving),
the Tigers were ranked numbert

one in college hockey.
WHEN THE two clubs clash
this time, Colorado will be rank-
ed number 12 and Michigan
13th.
"Michigan is the only team
that has an advantage over us,"
said Colorado coach Jeff Sauer.
"We've played .500 or better
against every other club."
Despite the revenge motive,
the series isn't as crucial to the
Tigers as it is to the Wolverines.
Sauer stated, "We consider it
an important series but after
we play Michigan, we play
Notre Dame, Duluth and Den-
ver."
Those teams are currently in
the basement of the WCHA.
They occupy seventh, eighth and
ninth place.

ASIAN-AMERICAN
* AWARENESS WEEK
series FEBRUARY 7, FRIDAY
FILM-"GUILTY BY REASON OF RACE"
Coman Lounqe. Baits 11 at 8 r.m.
THE COLORADO squad boasts Discussion of camp experience
of a balanced attack with thir- FEBRUARY 8, SATURDAY
teen of its starters in double CHILDRENS WORKSHOP at 10 a.m.
figures. Winger Jim Warner is Games for Children, Storvtellino
their leading scorer with 19 Community Oraonizina in Chicano
goals and 13 assists. Chinatown at 2 p.m.
Speakersfrom the Chinatown Communitv
Defenseman Jim Mitchell is BOTH AT THE
the leading scorer among de-
fensemen ,in the league with Ann Arbor Public1Library
11 goals and 16 assists. SOCIAL GET-TOGETHER a ry
SOCIL GE-TOGTHERat 8 p.m.
GOING INTO the series, South Quad, Smitty Lounge
Michigan has collected five " REFRESHMENTS AT ALL EVENTS
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on the road. The Wolverines Michiqan Union 4139
have yet to win a series on the >o<-" ->t<-,o a r <"""t0c" < <-- )c--

i

i
I

ACK OF $ HURTS

i
I

-
r
,
|4

like the men's sports, it em-
-JOHN KAHLER phasizes amateurism and not '
extravagance. In the Big Ten a

0

i

Women to boycott Wimbledon?
NEW YORK ()-Billie Jean King and her association of
women tennis pros gave Wimbledon one more chance Thursday
to give them equal prize money with the men-or a promise of it-
or face a boycott by the game's top players.
In London, Maj. David Mills, secretary of Wimbledon's
governing All-England Club, said. "The prize money has been
settled and there will be no alteration."
Prize money for the women at Wimbleton totals about 70
per cent that of the men.
Should Wimbledon refuse to yield, plans are in the making
for a rival women's tournament during the Wimbledon period
in late June and early July.
Gymnasts travel to Indiana
The Michigan gymnastics team travels to Bloomington,
Indiana this weekend to face Indiana and Illinois in a tri-team
meet.
Friday. night the compulsory portion takes place, in which
all entrants must perform like routines. Saturday, the optionals
are held, when each tumbler performs his own individual routine.
The Wolverines, coming off an impressive victory over
Ohio State last weekend, are led by co-captain Bruce Keeshin
and freshman sensation Harley Danner, winner of last week's
all-around competition.
Illinois should give Michigan a reasonably tough match, with
all but one of last year's performers returning. Indiana, which
participated in the Big Ten Invitational in Ann Arbor earlier this
year, shouldn't give the Wolverines much trouble.
-SCOTT LEWIS

supervisory committee w i 1I
meet this winter to discuss the,;
women's athletics within its
auspices.
A justification f o r men's
intercollegiate competition is
training for the professional
leagues. Female athletics sim-
ply offer experience in tough
organized competition.
ANOTHER philosophy behind
women's intercollegiates w a s
volunteered by Dr. Norman Mil-
ler, vice chancellor of student
and campus affairs at UCLA.
"The purpose is that we want
to recognize athletic ability inE
women," said Miller.
Michigan's athletic di:ector,
Don Canham, added, "I'd agree
with Dr. Miller. As in men's
snorts, it provides activity for
the top talent."
The National Women's Ath-
letic Organization, the A,31ia-
tion of Intercollegiate Athletics
for Women, c o n c l u de s that
men's sports have gOtten out of
hand monetarily and that the
women's sports will s.e:r away
from that type of atm'nphere.
On the basis of that ideology,
Michigan's 1973 committee to
study intercollegiate athletics
for women, the Burns Commit-
tee, suggested that its ath'etic
program keep in tune with the
AIAW philosophy.
"We are aware of the pres-
sures of commercialism and, in
our opinion, the disto ,tion of
values in some segments of so-
ciety when a 'win at any cost'
attitude takes over. Our en-
dorsement f o r intercollegiate
athletics for women carries with
it a 'parallel recommendation
that the A m a t e u r Prrn.iple
never be compromised.a
WOMEN'S athletics can riot
exist any other way than ama-
teur due to the costs involved.
Nine out of ten American col-
leges' and universities' athletic

ports iling
departments are in the red. recommend that there be do
There are at least two pro- athletic scholarships or recruit-
grams used to finance the fe- ment." That was in keeping
male departments. One cntiails with the "Amateur Principle"
funding from student fees and that the AIAW suppahted.
athletic department re c e i r t s In March of this year, wo-
and the other solely athletic men's intercollegiate sprts will
funds. be brought to the attention of
UCLA budgets $180,G1 by the the Big Ten. At the December
former s y s t e m. With this 6 meeting of the Big Ten wo-
money, Miller awarded $27,000 men's athletic administrators,
in scholarships based on abil- Illinois' assistant athletic direc-
ity; five full, and 31 part be- tor, Dr. Carol Kahrs, requested
sides grants in aid. He says it that a subcommittee be formed
will be $55,000 next year. in order "to create a better un-
On the other hand, Michigan derstanding of men's and yo-
does not get the student fee men's sports within tae Big
break and the athletic budget Ten."
bears the pain. Canharn' de- THIS GROUP meets March 4
partment allotted $80,000 this at the annual Big Ten conven-
year. Michigan doesn't plan to tion. It is comprised of the
grant women's athletic scholar- Rules and Agenda Cmmtee,
ships. the ten female and male ath-
CANHAM said, "No, we are letic directors.
not going to offer wvnen's The AIAW was founded under=
scholarships at Michigan. At the p r i n c i p 1 e of organizing
present we award 20 t non- intercollegiate competition be-
revenue sports and nex: year tween women. It condoned scho-
it'll be 18. Pretty soon we won't larships, recruiting and big time
be able to give any to men.' high pressured contests. l oday
When the Burns committee it has given the okay to waver-
submitted its report to the Re- ing tuitions, and scouting vo-
gents it stated, "We strongly men high school athletes.

road and this is their last
chance; after this weekend five
of their last six games are at
home.
'ere ISa ;
difference!!
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Your are invited to the opening reception
to meet the artists and Robert Meeropol
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3, -. .13

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IF -a -r n -s

Amaya leads under-21 stars
Michigan's Vic Amaya scored a singles victory and teamed
with Peter Fleming, recent Michigan transfer to UCLA, for aJ
doubles triumph Thursday, leading the United States to a 3-0
romp over Spain in an international tennis tournament for under-
21, players.
The towering 6-foot-7 Amaya used his height to advantage
in beating Javier Soler of Spain 7-6, 6-4. He won the first-set
tie-breaker 7-5, before taking the second set more handily.
NCAA champ John Whitlinger of Stanford then clinched the
Americans' victory in the best-of-three series, trouncing Salvador
Cabezas 6-0, 6-2 in only 33 min- '.- . - ininininrinin. -
utes. '
-DAILY WIRE SERVICES I 50c Off Med i

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JEWISH GRAD-FACULTY GROUP
BRUNCH
11 A.M.-FEB. 9
75c-Lox, Bagel, Conversation
DELI-5:30-6:30
with Corned Beef, Coke, etc.
ALL YOU CAN EAT FOR $2.00
All at HILLEL-1429 Hill St.
0 For all UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN Students
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March 2 - 9,1975 J
J 7 Nights (During Spring Break) 0

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Brig

Ask Mr. Foster Travel S rvice
Invites You To A
"JourneyToTeSn
Departing Detroit for
S. America & Africa
April 16
escorted by
Ethyl & Gordon Furlitte
film presentation will be shown at
arwood Mall Community Room:

'
urn 14" Pizza

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HI11

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