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February 06, 1975 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-06

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February 6, 19751

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, February 6, 1975

House votes against
tax on imported oil

GEO to take
strike vote

GEO walkout

(Continued from Page 1)
tion and he felt he had to take
steps to bring it to a head, so
he took the initiative by im-
posing the oil tax."
Mahon also said Ford indi-
cated he would be open to sug-
gestionis, but did not intend *to
back down from the action he
had taken.
BUT REP. Samuel Stratton
(D-N.Y.) told the House he had
approached Ford after the
breakfast with a proposal for a
60-day delay compromise and
"1 got the impression he was
not uninterested in that kind of
compromise . .. . think a com-
promise is a real possibility."
White House Press Secretary
Ron Nessen promptly said Ford
was going ahead with plans for
the three-step oil tax. He said
Ford was willing to look at any
concrete alternative proposed
by Congress but "all they are
asking for is a delay."
Nessen announced during the
day that Ford will go to Hous-
ton, Tex., and Topeka, Kan.,
I I
FILM-"Guilty by
gy
: Reason of Race"
TIME. 7:30 p.m. a
PLACE: West Quad Wiliam i
House Lounae
*EVENTS: 'Discussion of the
*Japanese - American experi-
f ence at t h e Relocation *
R Camps of World War II, fol-
f lowing the film
i REFRESHMENTS
.m mm=mmimmm=mminmum.w=... I

next week in his campaign for
public support of his economy
and energy proposals. Ford will
meet in Topeka Tuesday with
Midwest governors.
NESSEN ALSO said at a news
briefing that Ford will run for
a full term in 1976 regardless
of economic conditions at that
time. Nessen thus expanded on
Ford's statement at a Tuesday
news conference that "I think
the economic circumstances will
be good enough to justify at
least my 'seeking re-election."
In House debate on the oil im-
port bill, Republicans ham-
mered at thetheme that the
Democrats had produced no
counter proposals on the energy
problems and that nothing would
be gained by delaying Ford's
program.
Democrats, however, argued
that Congress had a right to
consider approaches to the goal
of reducing oil imports other
than the one chosen by Ford-
raising prices through a tax,
and so risking a burst of infla-
tion.

r
T
I
r
s
t
T
C
1
t
t

(Continued from Page 1)
added.
KRAUSSE explained that for
union members, a strike will
involvemrnot teaching classes
either on or off campus, refus-
ing to continue their research
work and not attending any of
their own classes.
T h e membership approved
two other proposals-the first
calls upon the faculty not to
involve any reprisals against
striking GSAs or undergradu-
ates who honor the picket lines

-the second pledges suppgart to
any organized opposition to the
University's raising tuition in
the face of rising salary rates.
Chief GEO negotiator Sandy
Wilkinson reaffirmed the union's
support for the Pilot Program,
saying that 18 teaching assist-
ants will lose their positions ifj
the program is axed.
Wilkinson claimed the pro-
gram has definite educational
value, and that GEO is com-
mitted to high quality under-
graduate education.

(Continued from Page1)
"If we do go on strike, I can't
support myself," said a GSA in
the Asian Studies department,
adding, "As a matter of fact, I
can't join the GEO simply be-
cause it costs money and I can't
afford it."
ONE GSA from the Speech
department asserted, "Even if
I could ethically manage to sup-
port a strike I couldn't do it
financially. Therecis no strike
fund."
A GSA in American Studies
cited frustration as the reason
for his opposition to a strike:
"I used to belong to the GEO
last year, but I got bored with
it. They play a lot of games.
I'm tired of waiting around in
a transient area for so long.
Besides, it's my last term teach-
ing and I don't really care."

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
^ { r " n r i r, .Y : "" : : i {:s:::::i':::$"::} "

THOSE GSAs willing to b
a walk-out ranked born fin
cial and non-financial issues
equally important in their
cision to support a strike.
"I need the money but e
nomics is not the m )st imp
tant issue in this dispute, ' s
one history GSA, adding, "I
willing to back down on
economic demand but not
issues like affirmative acto
One political science G
said virtually all of the iss
at stake were important to h
and criticized the University
its "stubborness.
"THE UNIVERSITY'S rec
eight per cent concession
was a blatant attempt to
rid of the union. . . We're w
ing to meet them half way,
they've only goneh ne step
the mile," she added.
Although less than half of1
total number of GSAs are pr
ently GEO m e m b e r s, un
spokesman David Gordon po
ed out that membershipI
been consistently increasing
recent weeks with no respite
view.
Gordon anticipated an e
stronger union before the stri
vote comes to a close on Mi
day, and maintained this ad
strength will significantly
crease chances for a success
walk out.
ANOTHER important fac
which will aid a GEO strike
the recent pledge from1
Michigan Brotherhood of Tea
sters to honor union picket L
should a walk-out occur.
Although it is uncertain
what extent the University

appears certain
ack tually depends on Te unters want to ally ourselves with one
ian- for its day-to-day operations, unit. We wouldn't want to take
as definite repercussions will be any punitive action against any-
de- felt. body."
Although Gordon would not re- IN CONTRAST to Gamson's
eco- veal where GEO would set up statement, Maurice Sinnott, As-
por- its picket lines, he did say the sociate Dean for Administration
said Teamsters had given their word in the School of Engineering,
am that the lines will not be s a i d his school's professors
the crossed. "definitely won't comply with
on WHEN GIVEN the y .he- GEO's appeal for professors not
A cal situation where a University tturn names of striking
'SA dorm was being picketedsby s"
ues GEO and a Teamster driven Sinnott added that all engi
her, truck arrived to deliver food neering classes will continuetc
for supplies, Gordon said, "That's meet despite a strike, and will
right. They would not cross it be taught by department pr
cent (the picket line)." fessors.
.t Yesterday, LSA department
t Gordon added that the GEO chairmen met with acting Dean
get petitioned the American Feder- Billy Frye to discuss a memor-
butl ation of State, County and Nu- andum from Vice President for
but nicipal Employes (AFSCME) Academic Affairs Frank Rhodes
of and U n i t e d Auto Workers concerning faculty conduct in
h (UAW) for support but 'dasGre- the event of a strike
the ceived "no official word." Cor-
res- don did say however that: EO THE MEMORANDUM affirm-
ion maintained "very good rela- ed the University's intention to
int- tions" with those unions. keep the University runnig and
has advised the faculty to cross any
in Another important factor in picket lines. It also stated that
in determining the success of a court injunctions might he used
GlSA walk-out will be the to b-.r e

-GET
ATVENTIOF

Thursday, February 6 tion waiver. ONE PSYCHOLOGY GSA not
Day Calendar U. of Sao Paulo offers research supporting a strike maintained,
1 ISMRRD: K. WedelI, "Perceptual scholarships for BA's with research "
Motor Disabilities and Research;" plan in any field, write Brazilian ''Unions tend to polarize the
M. Frostig, "Futures in Perceptual Embassy, Cultural Section, 3006 issues. I don't feel expolited. I
Training," 130 S. 1st St., 9:30 am- Massachusetts Ave., N. W., Wash., find GEO members get very
noon. D.C 20008. defensive and since I'm a psy-
WUOM: Panel Discussion, "The Liberal Arts graduates who de- chologist, I tend to get suspi-
Delaney Clause," with Gilbert Gold- sire to teach at secondary or junior~
heimer, consultant, Food & Drug college level but have no Ed. ciouS.
Admin., Dr. Jacqueline Varrett, FDA courses, MAT degree is offered at O
researcher, & Ruth Desmond, pres., Vanderbilt U. For secondary teach- Other non-supporters simply
homemaker's assoc., 10 am. ing in English & Soc. St., Brown don't agree with GEO demands.
Pendleton Arts Info. Ctr.: Mi- U. offers MAT with $4000 financial "I think it's the stupidest thing
chael Lynch, mime artist, Union, aid, good record of placing their I ever heard of," declared one
noon. graduates. Northwestern U. will ac- chemistry GSA when asked
MHRI: Wm. Hodos, U. of MD, Col- cept 7Q into their MAT program
lege Park, "Anatomical and Be- for Arts & Science majors to teach about a strike.
havorial Studies of the Avian Visual in Elem. or Secondary Schools. "Many of the demands are
System," 1057 MHRI, 3:45 m. More information at CP&P. -y
CREES; Chinese Studies: W. Eur- Career Opportunities for Women: way out in left field. I think
ean uStdies:aoinhsrdluetaoinetaoin Representatives from Upjohn Com- we're very well paid as it is,
opeau Studies: Stanley Payne, U of pany and Manufacturer's National and I don't think a lot of GSAs
Wisconsin . Succession in Spain," Bank will articipate in luncheon/ are even doing a good job. We
EE. Conf. Rm., Rackham,. 4 pml~. discussion on Feb. 10. 12 Noon in dntdsremr, eadd
Low Energy Seminar: Dr. Fred conference Rms. 4 and 5, Michi- don't deserve more," he added,
Lamb, U. of Illinois, "Physics of gan League. estimating GEO members:iip in
white Dwarf Stars" P&A Colloq. summer Placement the chemistry department at 25
Rm., 4 pm.i
Spanish Lang., Culture Films: 3200 SAB, 763-4117 per cent.
Who Invited Us? 126 Res. Coll., 4 Jewish Community Center Day - -- ~---
pm. Camp, Detroit. Will interview
Int'l Night: Japanese food, Thurs. Feb. 13 from 10 to 5. Open- e e t
Biotechnic Recentraization Lec- Culture, Waterfront (WSI), arts/ Uec te
tures: Peter van Dresser, Rackham crafts, bus driver, general counse-
Amph., 7:30-10 pm. lors
Music School: Faculty recital, Camp Sequois, Mich. Coed. Will (Continued from Page 1)
Rackham Aud., 8 pm. Interview Thurs. Feb. 13 from 10 to(CniudfoPae1
women's Studies: Mini-course on 5. Openings include waterfront However, the release said the
V Woolf, 2402 Mason, 7-9 pm; (WSI), Riding (Esg./Western), arts/ Regents agered to offer Cobb a
films, Chisholm: Pursuing the crafts, sports, general counselors. five-year contract followed b
{Dream, Lec. Rm. 1, MLB, 8 pm. Silverman Village, Mich. Emo -year cnrc olwdby
Career Planning & Placement tionally Disturbed. Will interview tenure evaluation.
3200 SAB, 764-7460 Friday, Feb. 14 from 10:30 to 5.
Harvard / Grad. Sch. of Bus. Ad. Specialists required. THE SECOND press state-
announced openings for Course Camp Sea Gull, Mi. Ced. Will in- ment, issued only hours later,
Assts; job descriptions & appl. terview Mon. Feb. 17 from 10-5. enisdoly 'or ae,
available at C P& P. Openings include Waterfront (WS- reports: "Because mutually sat-
Grad. Assistantships in Math at I), arts/crafts, drama, general coun- isfactory terms could not be
Adelnhi U. LI. $2857-3056 plus tui- selors. , .,. ,+-

r
s
t
r
t

ven
rike
ton-
ded
in-
sf ul
ctor
e is
the
am-
nes
to
ac- I

amount of faculty support the
union can muster. In the event
of a strike, the GEO is asking
the faculty not to substitute for
striking GSAs nor turn its the
strikers' names.
Sentiment varies between de
partments and schools with fac-
ulty members found on ooth
sides of the fence concerning a
strike.
Sociology Department Chair-
man William Gamson asserted,
"We wouldn't want to engage
in scabbing. We work pretty
closely with GSAs and we don't

Frye's comments after the
closed-door session were non-
commital. He merely said that
the administration had na firm
plans and "individual depart-
ments are discussing alterna-
tives."
One department chairman in
reaction to the meeting said
"nothing happened," emphasiz-
ing "anything the faculty does
is symbolic anyway." Ae esti-
mated a strike would last about
a week before the University
conceded, less if the Teamsters
became actively involved.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
PRESENTS

THEATRE PROGRAM

d Cobb on tenure issue

BREAD aryd ROSES
anew play by Donald Hall

WEDNESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY.
FEBRUARY 5, 6, 7, 8, 19758:00 PM
THE POWER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ART

S

1 1
t

- k i 1
.,. u. : .,
;J-

V..l'

v. .N +a v .+s q.rvai " -vvvv Y Mu r ana

III

.'1

.. .
" \ a
ADVANCE SA-E AND INFORMATION:
TI CKETOFFICE , MENDELSSOHN LOBBY, 764-0450
TICKETS NOW ON SALE

DONALD HALL
poet and playwright
will be talking about his play
"BREAD AND ROSES" at
GUILD HOUSE
NOON LUNCHEON
(soup and sandwich 50c)

agreed upon, the Regents in a
further meeting decided to dis-
continue the negotiations."
Neither statement acknowl-
eged that the end of negotia-
tions consisted of the University
turning down Cobb.
Several high-level sources yes-
terday challenged the credibil-
ity of the zoology department's
quick decision on Cobb's tenure
-a decision which, according to
the retracted p r e s s release,
came only "a day and a half
after Vice Presidenf Rhodes re-
quested a ruling on the tenure
issue January 23.
HIS REQUEST came after
Cobb questioned her first con-
troversial offer from the Uni-
versity: two years as LSA dtan
with no mention of tenure.
Robert Beyer, the zoology de-

partment's senior tell bicogist,'
said, "I assumed they (the de-
partment's executive commit-
tee) would have contacted me"
since his expertise is in Cobb's
field.
Beyer also echoed the amaze-
ment expressed by many faculty
members that professorial ten-
ure - a decision which usually
takes weeks of review - could
have been offered or refused in
only 36 hours.
Beyer also echoed the amaze-
ment expressed by many facul-
ty members that professorial
tenure - a decision which us-
ually takes weeks of review -
could have been offered or re-
fused in only 36 hours.
BEYER SAID the executive'
committee's reportedly unani-
mous refusal vote "was really
kept hush-hush," and another
source close to the department
emphasized: "This is the most
secret decision they've ever
made."
Department Chairman Carl
Gans has refused to comment
on any aspect of the deanship
controversy.
The retracted press release

SAN FRANCISCO (iP)
-The San Francisco Symphony
in cooperation with radio sta-
tion KKHI is planning a money-
raising 56 hours in February.
A catalog will be prepared
and distributed containing a list
of recordings from which the
public may request selected
pieces of music from $15 to $3,-
500 to be played over the air
during the 56 hours. The money
goes to the symphony; the proj-
ected goal is $100,000.
This year four major sym-
phony orchestras cosponsored
marathons with classical music
stations. It was the fifth year
for Cleveland, the fourth for
Boston and the first for Denver
and the National Symphony in
Washington.
Cleveland netted $39,840 in
1970 and $73,530 in 1974, bring-I
ing a total of $281,388 over the
five years.

Be careful with fire:
There are babes
in the woods.

said Gans assured Rhodes that Connecticut College.
"this opinion (on Cobb's tenure)
was impartial and uninfluenced THE SOURCE also noted that
by recent publicity." Cobb has gained praise for con-
BUT SEVERAL sources in the tinuing her research on cancer
biology field and elsewhere said after she took her current ad-
they were mystified by Cobb's ministrative post.
rejection in light of her "super- "Administrators usually don't
ior" academic credentials. have much time," said the bo-
"Her reputation as both an logist, "but she's terrific. She
administrator and a researcher spends all her vacations doing
is excellent; it's terrific," said research at Woods Hole (a ma-
a biologist acquainted with jor biological research lab in
Cobb, who is presently dean of Massachusetts)."

FRIDAY, FEB. 7
802 Monroe

.

'U'

VALENTINE GREETING VALENTINE GREETING VALENTINE GREETING (
For Someone
You Love I
4. k
SAY IT BETWEEN THE SHEETS.. .OF THE MICHIGAN DAILY
WINNIE, I can't bear being away
24 FROGGIE-Your love is the wart of from you. Till next week when we
my life.-Lilly Pad. - can hibernate in our cubby hole,
Happy Valentine's Day-Pooh.
AtA
YOUR VALENTINE MESSAGE:
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-

ii

Ii
II

WILLIAM HODOS
DEPT. OF PSYCHOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND
"Anatomical and Behavioral Studies
of the Avian Visual System"
FEBRUARY 6
MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE SEMINAR SERIES
TEA: 3:15 p.m., Room 2059
SEMINAR: 3:45 p.m., Room 1057

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