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February 05, 1975 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-05

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Wednesday, February 5, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednesday, February 5, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

AIM representative
speaks on campus

By SUE WILHELM
Regina Brave Dixon and Bob
Yellowbird, Native Americans
from the Pine Ridge reserva-
tion, told an enthusiastic cam-
pus crowd last night that stu-
dent protest played a crucial
role during the Wounded Knee
occupation.
"If it hadn't been for univer-
sity students, we would have
had a lot harder time of it -
not that it wasn't bad enough
as it was," said Dixon, an ac-
tive member -in the American
Indian Movement (AIM) since
1972.
DIXON AND Yellowbird spoke
as part of a continuing series
of lectures on Native Ameri-
cans and AIM sponsored by sev-
eral University groups.
Both speakers criticized the
press for "one-sided coverage"
of AIM, particularly during
the Wounded Knee incident.
"All they wanted were blood
and guts stories," stated Yel-
lowbird, "AIM has never gone
into any area without a spe-
cific invitation from the peo-
ple there."
Her voice breaking as she
spoke, Dixon explained the role
of women in the movement:
"We saw what was happening
to our men; we were tired of
seeing them sent to jail or com-
mitting suicide. We want to
make the world recognize us
for what we are - a sovereign
nation, free to create our own
destinies."!
DIXON AND Yellowbird were'
joined by Paul Johnson, a Na-
tive American and University
graduate, who is presently rep-
resenting the children of the
Chippewa, Ottawa and Potowa-
tomi tribes in a class action suit
filed against the Board of Re-
gents.
The suit charges the Univer-
sity failed to disburse funds re-
ceived from the sale and use
of lands acquired from Native
Americans through the Treaty
of Fort Meigs.

Johnson contends Article 16
of the treaty calls for the place-
ment of funds received from the
use or sale of these lands into
a trust for Indian education.
"We are not like other minori-
ties. We do not ask for our
civil rights but for our treaty
and our human rights," said
Johnson.
AS A RESULT, several Uni-
versity students have organized
a "Committee to Uphold the
Fort Meigs Treaty". As part of
their effort to create campus-
wide awareness of the case, this
committee helped to sponsor
last nights lecture.
The University's official posi-
tion on the matter is that the
treaty does not create a trust
as a matter of law, according
to University General Counsel
Roderick Daane. He claims that
if any rights were created for
the members of the three tribes,
they have been nullified by sub-
sequent treaties.
Kevin Hart, University advo-
cate for Native Americans, re-
ports that Native American
students are optimistic about
the case. However he notes "the
prevailing attitude among the
students is that the University
is cold and unresponsive to Na-
tive Americans. It is geared
specifically for white middle-
class intellectuals.
"ALTHOUGH there is disa-
greement among individuals
on how to go about getting the
treaty rights upheld, everyone
agrees that something must be
done," said Hart.
Harry Macomber, a local citi-
zen, summed up the general at-
titude of ,the Native Americans
when he wrote; "I have thought
that all Americans, Indian and
non-Indian should be concern-
ed with seeing that the White
Man, after breaking 388 Indian
Treaties, will at long last be
required by the Washtenaw Cir-
cuit Court to live up to at least
one."

Car sales rise
in late January
DETROIT YP) - New car to 34,543 in the
sales strengthened in late Jan- attributed the g
uary as cash rebate plans spur- bate plan, which
red deliveries an estimated 36 "We are Very p
per cent above mid-January lev- results," Vice P
els, industry analysts said yes- Brown said.
terday. But Chrysler'
But the usual discounting liveries of 70,61
moves apparently failed to lift per cent from 1
the ailing industry out of its before, making
worst slump since World War pany's worstJ
Two, Chrysler Corp. figures in- years.
dicated. THE FINAL J
TOTAL January sales were are the first to
expected to be the lowest for effect of $200 t
the month since 1961 and mark the companies
the 16th consecutive month that on some new n
deliveries have lagged behind month to perk uj
year - earlier levels. Some industry
Import sales were expected to the sales gains
be 80,000 to 90,000, a 29 to 37 per the rebate plar
cent decline from 126,000 in March 1 at GM,
January 1974. may be exagger,
Chrysler Corp, the first auto1 the exceptional,
maker to offer discounts on rate in the ea
some new cars, reported yester- the month, wh
day its sales Jan 21-31 were up lowest for the pe
17 per cent from the middle ten "You have to
days of the month, based on the you were startir
daily selling rate. rifically low ba
General Motors and Ameri- still end up belo
can Motors were to report their els of last year
figures late yesterday, and said.
Ford Motor Co. will report to- THE ANALY
day. gradual improve
Chrysler, which saw its sales in the coming
increase from 11,654 in early when the ret
January and 23,608 in midmonth I close.

final ten days,
ains to its re-
h ends Feb. 16.
leased with the
President R. K.
s monthly de-
19 were off 30
00,150 the year
it the com-
January in 11
January figures
reflect the full
o $600 rebates
began offering
models in mid-
p sagging sales.
y analysts say
attributed to
ns, which end
Ford and AMC,
ated because of
ly poor selling
rly portion of
en sales were
eriod on record.
remember that
ng from a ter-
ase, and you'll
w the poor lev-
r," one analyst
STS expect a
ement in sales
months, even
bate programs

l
&fe $250.

ACTOR MARLON BRANDO, left, and civil rights advocate Rev. James Groppi walk hand
in hand outside Shawano late Monday night, following the surrender of the Alexian broth-
ers novitiate at nearby Gresham.
Dail Official Buletin Indians
Wedn esdav Februarv 5

r u w a , r ~y a- - "
Day Calendar
WUOM: Alien Lithman, "Auro-
vile: An Evolving Alternative Fu-
tr," 9:55 am.
Ccs: M. Kochen, "Information y
Storage and Retrieval," 2050 Frieze
Bldg.. 10 am.
ISMRRD: K. Wedell, "Perceptual, GRESHAM, Wis. UP) - Ar-
Motor Disabilities and Research;" , raignment began yesterday in"
M. Frostig, "Futures in Perceptual: g ntban forda de
Training," 130 S. 1st St., 2:30-5 pm. nearby Shawano for Indian de-
Natural Resources, Art: Ed Needle- Imronstrators who surrendered!
man, Bob Chapin, "The Lawyers' Monday night to end a 34 day
Eye view of Environmental Litiga- armed takeover of a backwoods
tion," 1040 Nat. Resources, 3 pm. eIgiu sae
Biotechnic Recentralization Lec-
tures: Peter van Dresser, 2104 Art, The 39 Indian demonstrators,
Arch. Bldg., N. C., 3:15-5 PM. taken into custody from the es-
Botany Seminar: Dr. Harold S.
Irwin, N Y Botanical Gardens, tate in national guard buses
"Preparing for Tomorrow's Chal- and locked up in the Shawano
lenges Today," Botanical Gardens, county jail, were booked on
1800 N. Dixboro Rd., 4 pm. misdemeanor and disorderly
General Physics Colloquium: P. conduct counts. Nine were
Hammerling & F. J. Mayer, KMStundoetouvil th-
Fusion, Inc., Current State Experi- turned over to juvenile author-
ment and Theory in Laser Fusion," ities.
P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 pm.
Statistics: Bruce Hill, "Exact Ba- T H E DEMONSTRATORS{
Iyesian Salution for Multivariate in-
admissibility," had agreed to surrender as a
pm. condition of a settlement under
Cinema Guild: English; Amer. which the unused former Alex-
Studies: Bergman's Passion of An- ian brothers novitiate they seiz-
na; Gerald O'Grady, Spkr., Rack- ed at gunpoint Jan. 1 would be
ham Amph, 7 pm.
Computing Ctr.; CCS: B. Carna- deeded to the Menominee tribe.I
han, "Fortran-IV Programming Lan- The court set March 7 for
guage; 3," Nat. set. Aud., 7:30-9:301
pm. ,.the start of the trial, and spe-
Music School: Alan Hawkins, bas cial prosecutor Daniel Ashen-
soon doctoral, Recital Hall, 8 pm. brenner suggested a mass trial.
Career Planning & Placement A February 26 hearing for pre-
3200 sA 6 4-7460a e trial motions was also slated.

stay
Movement to help Wisconsin
Legal Services defend the In-
dians said he was told other
charges would include armed
robbery, armed burglary, and
endangering of safety.
Bonds for the first two In-
dians to appear, each charged
with two misdemeanors, were
set at $150 each.
Stadelman said his office is
in the proceeds of verifying
the names, addresses and ages
of the prisoners. The Indians,
calling themselves the Menomi-
nee Warrior Society were ju-
bilant despite handcuffed wrists
as they ended the seige Mon-
day night, and counted it a coup
for American Indians.
SEVERAL mediators were
allowed to leave the abbey un-
der immunity from arrest, in-
cluding Bryan, a nurse, and
actor Marlon Brando.
Brando, a supporter of In-
dian causes nationally, said he
came under fire for the first
time in the three days he spent
at the abbey.
"We were up there on the
roof and the bullets started to

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OWEN"

STUDENTS!
DO Y O U WISH TO INFLUENCE
POLICY DECISIONS ON HOUSING
ISSUES? Housing Unit Committee
needs non-residence h a I I student
members to provide input.
TO APPLY CALL WENDE BOWIE-764-6413

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Ethiopian city torn
by guerrilla fightmg

APPLICANTS WANTED
FOR
ACADEMIC AND ADMINISTRATIVE
POSITIONS
1,200 CURRENT POSITIONS LISTED TO DATE
COOPERATIVE COLLEGE REGISTRY
Dept. G, Suite 10, One Dupont Circle,
Washington, D.C. 20036-(202) 223-2807

ADDIS ABABA, (Reuter) -
Asmara wore the look ofna ghost
town yesterday as an uneasy
calm settled on Eritrean capital
after four days of heavy fight-
ing between secessionist guer-
rillas and Ethiopian troops.
The city of 180,000 people
was virtually cut off and relia-
ble sources said that an Ethio-
pian armored convoy was stuck
55 miles to the south after guer-
rillas blew up the Cascasse road
bridge.
THE CONVOY of 52 tanks,
20 armored vehicles and sev-
eral troop carriers was on its
way from Addis Ababa, 550
miles south of Asmara, to bol-
ster Ethiopian forces in their
battles with guerrillas seeking
the secession of Eritrea from
Ethiopia.
The guerrillas launched a 15-
minute attack on three targets
in Asmara shortly after mid-
night, according to reliable
sources, but no further fight-
ing was reported in the city
during the day.
The sources said military ac-
tivity had also subsided on the
outskirts of the city. Earlier
today a huge column of smoke
hung over the northern sub-
urbs following fighting yester-
day in which the city's power
station, already damaged, was
put out of action and its diesel
fuel storage tanks were set on:
fire.
THE CITY'S streets were de-
serted today with shops, gov-
ernment offices and industrial
enterprises closed. Electricity
and water supplies were cut off
for the fourth successive day
and food supplies were expect-
ed to last no more than four
days.
Britain and the United States
meanwhile began the evacua-
tion of their nationals from As-
mara, chartering a DC-6 air-
craft from Ethiopian airlines to
fly out 60 Americans and 20
Britons.
The French Embassy in Ad-
dis Ababa was planning to
use military aircraft from Dji-
bouti, in France's enclave on
the Red Sea, to fly French na-
tional out of Asmara tomorrow.
THE GUERRILLAS, using
r.

hand grenades and machine
guns, attacked three targets in
simultaneous hit-and-run raids
just after midnight.
The targets were Asmara's
exhibition grounds, which are
used as army quarters, the
headquarters o fthe Ethiopian
second army division and tele-
c o m m u n i c a t i o n s fa-
cilities. There were no details
of casualties or damage.
The attacks came shortly af-
ter the ruling military council
issued a statement in Addis
Ababa -the first since fight-
ing started on Friday - saying
that peace had been restored
in Asmara and civilians had
returned to work.
THE FIGHTING, the heav-
iest since guerrilla operations
began in 1962, has killed at least
70 people and the military state-
ment laid the blame for the
bloodshed squarely on the guer-
rillas.
The statement reiterated that
the Ethiopian military govern-
ment would continue to seek a
peaceful solution to the Erit-
rean problem.
Guerrilla activity in the pro-
vince started when Eritrea -
formerly a federal state with a
large degree of autonomy -
was incorporated into Ethiopia
in 1962.
IN ANOTHER announcement
released today, the military
government granted full am-
nesty to what it termed those
who fled from towns and from
the country because they com-
mitted murder, felonies, and
robberies.
The announcement set an Ap-
ril 8 deadline for such people
to return to their jobs. It was
not immediately clear who was
affected by the decision.

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Harvard University Graduate
School of Bus. Admin. has an-
nounced openings for Course As-
sistants. Job description & applica-
tions aailable at CP&P.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

District Attorney Richard
Stadelman said felony chargesI
against some persons would be:

Graduate Assistantships in Math added. fly all around us, then there
at Adelphi U, LI, $2858-3056 plus ROBERT BRYAN, a lawyer was a certain kind of unreal-
tuition waiver.
U. of Sao Paulo offers research hired by the American Indian ity," he said.
scholarships for BA's with a re-
search plan in any field. Write t' o G tG t ~ ~ ~ ~ r^t
Brazilian Embassy, Cultural Section,{
Massachusetts Ave., N.W., wash.
3006 Massachusetts Ave., NmW.,
Wash., D. C. 20008. _
Liberal Arts graduates who de- 0
sire to teach at secondary or fjun-
for college level but have no E.tj
course, MAT degree is offered at
vanderbilt U. For secondary teach-
ing in English & Soc. Se., Brown
U. offers MAT with $4000 financialC
aid and has a good record of
placing their graduates. Northwest-
ern U. will accept 70 into thatI
WAT prog. for arts & science majors
to teach in elem. or secondary
schools. More info at CP&P. T
Summer Placement
3200 sAB, 763-4117 D)Y
Irish Hills Girl Scout Council, v
MI.: interview Thurs. Feb. 6 10-5; U
openings include waterfront, gen. "
counselors and specialists in many
fils.tt j Remember your loved one
THE DAILY
Sal. Drop-In 0 'VALENTINE GREETINGS'
WORKSHOPS QICOLUMN
DEADLINE: NOON
in WEAVING and THURS., FEB. 13
BASKETRY SPECIAL RATES
ATv
EWE n' DYE Sorrv, no phone orders
994-1166
>.-o-- --toe-yoc--t7 -to --><--y~to y

__ .

Course Mart is a Department
run by Undergraduates
It provides an opportunity for faculty members and qualified
students to teach subjects not housed by traditional Depts.
If you are an expert at something and think you could
teach-Contact 1018 Angell Hall, Student Counseling
Office.
HURRY-the Deadline for Fall Term is Feb. 20th
Some courses that have been taught in the past:

o Contemporary
Speculative Fiction
" Talmudic Law
* Breakdown of Free
Enterprise
0 t1*

" Introduction to Vedanta
* Women in Medieval
Literature
o Rudolf Steiner's
Mystery Drama

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UMMMMM-

Free Exhibition
Pocket Billiards
"PAUL GERM"
FEB. 20-4 & 8 p.m.
Union Ballroom

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MEETING
Wednesday, Feb. 5-8:00 p.m.
Michigan Union
SPRING BREAK TRIP TO UTAH
71/2 days of skiing at:
ALTA: the dowager queen of powder skiing.
SNOWBIRD: the ultramodern counterpart to Alta with a 125-passen-
ger tramway and 3100 vertical feet of challenging bowls and
trais.
N.B.: the above areas average twice the snowfall of Colorado resorts
such as Aspen.

I1

I1~e £Mt41anDuit
OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS - 764-0557
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY-12:00 p.m.
DISPLAY ADS - 764-0554

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HIGHER GRADES
WITH
LESS EFFORT

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MONDAY thru FRIDAY-12 p.m.-4 p.m.
Deadline for Sunday issue-
WEDNESDAY at 5 p.m.

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