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February 04, 1975 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-04

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Tuesday, February 4 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Tuesday, February 4, 1975 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1-

Tigh t
proves
By DAVID BURHENN
The Tokyo String Quartet cli-
maxed an already superb series
of string quartets in their Sun-
day presentation of the Cham-
ber Arts Series. Their pro-
gram of Haydn, Bartok, and
Debussey was a clear cut de-
monstration of first-rate talent.
The quartet, four young Jap-
anese musicians trained in To-
kyo and at the Julliard School
in New York, consists of Koi-

Tokyo quartet
breathtaking

they were by the Tokyo, the
effect is breathtaking.
The quartet sensed and lis-
tened to each other with uncan-
ny accuracy, sympathetic to the
expression of the individual, yetI
subordinating wills to the col-
lective demands of the particu-
lar work.
Ensemble was aided by the
nicely balanced set of Amatij
instruments loaned to the quar-
tet by the Corcoran gallery. The
group's sound was rich and

_t_ ___ TT___._..t_ __] TT!1_____ Tl..... ,.7 ...

Hauenstein
Music School mourns
Hauenstein's death
By DAVID WEINBERG and TONY CECERE
Nelson M. Hauenstein, associate dean for academic
affairs at the School of Music, died yesterday afternoon at
the age of 54.
Hauenstein, who had been ill for several weeks, had
served as an instructor of flute at the University since
1947. He was appointed to a full professorship in 1963, and
was designated associate dean in 1971.
He was a charter member of the Music School's Wood-
wind Quintet, and was the flautist in the Baroque Trio.
He performed frequently in concert appearances with the
Ann Arbor and Plymouth orchestras.
Music School Dean Allen Britton called Hauenstein "one
of the best flautists in the world."
"He was the kind of person that everyone just loved,"
Britton said. "He was an outstanding teacher of flute. All
of us are desolated by his death."
Associate Dean Robert Warner termed Hauenstein "a
superb musician, whose playing produced memorable ex-
periences and whose teaching inspired hundreds of talented
pupils."
Hauenstein was a graduate of the Eastman School of
Music. He received a master's degree from the University
in 1947.
Can earth survive a
DoomsdayWh h? oo
e

chiro Harada and Kikuei Ikeda,
violinists, Kazuhide Isomura,
violist, and cellist Sadao Hara-
da.
The musicians may be young,;
but their performance gave'
little indication of any musical
immaturity. What impressed
this reviewer most was the abil-
ity of the four to achieve pre-
cise unity of attack and expres-
sion.
For example, the beginning
of the Bartok Quartet No. S con-
sists of a series of heavily ac-
cented, almost barbaric unison
chords. Played slightly out of
synchronization, the effect is
disasterous. Played together, as

smooth, helped along by the
acoustics of plushly carpeted
Rackham Amphitheater. All at-
tempts by the Musical Society,
to move quartet concerts into
the concrete Power Center,
should be dissuaded.
The program began withl
Haydn - the Quartet in B-flat, 1
major, Op. 50 No. 1. The inter- '
pretation was lush, and the Vi-1
' ennese grace of this delight-f
ful work was deliniated by the
Tokyo.
The four movement work is
essential Haydn - robust, hu-
morous, and framed in eigh-
teenth century elegance. The
vivace finale was great fun.

There was, however, a sore
point to the usually smooth
sound of the Tokyo. First vio-
linist Harada often strained to
achieve a predominance over,
the rest of the quartet. The
strain was really unnecessary-
the rest of the quartet neverJ
actually drowned Harada out,
and the strain sometimes
cracked the violinist's tone.
The Bartok, performed sec-
ond on the program, is a work
that reflects stylistic trends
from both the middle and late
periods of the composer's life.
In arch form, like the fourthj
quartet, it also shares many
of the tonal effects and devices
of its predecessor. Harmonic-
ally, however, the fifth quartet
is linked to such later Bartok
as the Concerto for Strings, Per-
cussion, and Celeste.
The Tokyo's precision was
important in performing this
thorny quartet, full of rhythmic
pratfalls and technical deviltry.
The four showed an understand-
ing both for the folk music
foundations and the sophisticat-
ed compositional technique in-
herent in the work.
The Debussy Quartet in Gj
Minor ended the program. The
performance was tight, with
clear definition of the multi-
textured harmonies.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN THEATRE PROGRAM
PRESENTS
BREAD arnd ROSES
a new play by Donald Hall

Kosher is more'than a
Name for a Dill Pickle!
The Importance of
Keeping Kosher for
Modern Man
The Why and How
Tues., Feb. 4-8 p.m.
Part of the
living Jewish Catalog
at
ILLEL--420 Hill St.
663-33 36

!" 8. 1975 8

;..

PRESENTS
IVAN THE TERRIBLE
PART I
Directed by SERGEI EISENSTEIN, 1944
One of the few true film epics
TODAY, TUESDAY, Feb. 4
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL
7:00, 8:45, 10:30
ADM. $1 .25
TOMORROW: Women in Love 7 & 9:30
THURS.: Woman in the Dunes 7 & 9:30
At AUD. A
-

Miniature Indian art
provides cultural link

1: ~ -~
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f.
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:.r
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By CHRIS K
All this week
through Feb. 23,
Art is featuring
ture Paintings fr
collection, an ex
at least as hist'
cant as it is art
The paintings
product of the re
hal rulers, dire
of the Mongols,
most of Indian i
tury. Some of t
traced to the n
can region ofs
show heavy Hin
The exhibition

Of the ndianU ;
win Binney, a fc
By DICK WEST with millions of cans of oven professor now m
WASHINGTON UPI-Disaster cleaner, spot removers, bug in California. B
movies are very big this season. killers, hair fixatives, paints to travel the
Two in particular, "The Tower- and varnishes, air fresheners, search of Indian
ing Inferno" and "Earthquake," cheese spreads, doggy deodo- i
have been drawing huge crowds. rants, underarm ntii- and has, in the
I wouldn't try to analyze why ants, and myriad other sprays seum curator,
so many people enjoy films with too numerous to enumerate. "the largest an
victims trapped in blazing sky- It doesn't take much imagina- "t laet n'
scrapers or the ruins of shatter- ion to recognize that here w tares in the We
howevers have the makings of a firsttusinheW
e mabe ceanclass disaster and one helluva The works ar
We may be certain, hoee'motion picture. Near Eastern (P
that even now other producerstro- The visual effects should be kish) and ind
phis with strong entertainment positively staggering. Entire schools. Since I
values, neighborhoods engulfed in form- duced for books
One idea occurred to me ing rust inhibitors . . . Subur- of Mughal ruler
banites frantically fleeing be- are quite small
passengers trapped in an ocean fore a tidal wave of depres- q"miniatures"),
lifder that capsizes in a gigantic surized laundry starch . . . ibly detailed an
wave. But I decided that type Socko! ed
of disaster might be too un- Itrsigy
realistic for the averagetmovie- Plus heroism and romance, a Interestingly,
goer. Burt Reynolds rescuing Fanne a product of a
So I'm betting the next smash Foxe from sudden mummifica- ishop.tOne art.
calamity flick will be along the! tion in spray wax buildup. illustration, an(
limes suggested in a letter I "Aerosal Deluge" should be and yet another
received from Lester Shirley of box office dynamite, folks. And caligraphy tha
Cromberg, Calif. apocalyptic, too.
Watch for "Aerosol Deluge," How will the world end? Not
coning soon to your neighbor- with a bang, and not with a'
hood theater. .whimper, but with a mighty
Acording to recently pub- whoosh.
lished reports, pressurized cans
found in most homes are po- PORTLand, Ore. (P) -
tentially explosive under certain Thirty-five per cent of the na- 0
conditions.. . tion's epilepsy victims are "re- If
The premise of this film is sistant" to treatment, says D.
that some 4ay all the spray Richard Schmidt of New York
cans in a large American city who spoke recently at a Port- WriteI
will explode simultaneously. land epilepsy seminar. CN
We know from watching He said many epileptics can- SERMATEO
shaving cream commercials not experience the "maximum" E
that the cans are capable of benefits of existing drugs.
releasing immense gobs of He added that heavy re-
er ordinary circumstances, search is being done to develop
this potential is no threat to drugs to help those hard-to-
life and limb because it is treat patients.
never fully realized. Not every-
one shaves at the same time,
and one shaver only squirts out Free Exhibition 1
enough to cover his own beard.
But suppose these caged coun- Pocket Billiards
taunes of goop all emerged in
6ne big eruption. And suppose "PAUL GERN I"
they were joined by the con-
tents of thousands of cans of 'FEB. 20-4 & 8 p.m.
instant non-dairy dessert top- Union Ballroom
ping.
Which were then combined

OCHMANSKI each. Many miniatures have,
and continuing throughout history, been trans-
the Museum of posed from book to book, from
Indian Mima- collection to collection, so that
'm the Binney todaythey are bordered by to-
r:btion thati tally inappropriate caligraphy.
Khibitinta s
orically signifi- Furthermore, Indian rulers
istically. have frequently offered the
are mainly a paintings as gifts or used them
ign of the Mug- as political ploys, particularly
ct descendants in dealing with British govern-
who controlled ments. As a result they had
n the 16th cen- been dispersed all over the
the miniatures, Eurasian continent, making
on-Mughal Dec- Binney's accomplishment seem
southern India, all the more significant.
Au influence. The content of the paintings
is only a part themselves prove of little inter-
ollection of Ed- est to laymen art critics, as
ormer Harvard they deal with such matters as
aking his home "the beating of a slave," and
inney is known "an elephant bearing a pris-
world over in oner." Moreover they are pri-
paintings that mitive in comparison with the
n his collection, realistic painting of Western
words of a Mu- civilization. Yet for local art
accumulated historians, a full three weeks
d most import- remains to satisfy their curios-
f Indian minia- ity in Indian art.
st." The Ann Arbor exhibition is
re a blend of only one in a two-year series of!
Persian and Tur- stops that will take the Binney
digenous Indian collection across the United:
they were pro- States. The Art Museum, locat-
and portfolios ed on State St. opposite the'
s, the paintings Union, is open to the public
(hence the term from 9 to 5 daily, and from 2
yet are incred- t to 5 on Sundays.
nd well-preserv-------.----
t - -___ ___

A
R
T
S

Have a flair for
artistic writing?
Ifyu ar~eieest-
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories a b o u t the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
MichiganjDally.
-- -

ADVANCE SALE AND INFORMATION:
TICKET OFFICE ,MENDELSSOHN LOBBY, 764-0450
TICKETS NOW ON SALE
Professional Theatre Program
TOM MALLOW

~onight at 7 & 9 ONLY
OPEN at 6 45
'A FILM OF
EXHILARATING
BEAUTY...
EXTRAVAGANTLY
FUNNY.
Amarcord'
may possibly
be Federico
Fellini's most
marvelous film."
-Vincent Canby,
N. Y. Times
FRANCOj
CRISTALDIS fELNlN
( O R
(1 REMEMBER") I

'"Bob
e2arro1"
F7iidd ler
on the Roof
Based i on iom A* Ctems stor*S
BY SCWc'Pemti~dof otArfOd Pert

Rproducod by
RICH ARALTMa

toproducod ay
DWM 8B

the majority are
a "royal work-!
ist handled the
pother painted,
worked on the
t accompanies

The 6 Sonatas & Partitas
FOR SOLO VIOLIN
OF
SAG-H
TO BE PERFORMED BY
M i HA POGACNIK
one of the finest violinists of the younger
qenertion."-Fronco Gulli, Josef Ginqold.

B001by JOSEPH STEIN
' mVJERRY DOCK
NOW Lynn y SHELDON HARNICK
rgna New ok r ouwction "dand Cameagr*eO by
JEROME ROBBINS
ONE NIGHT ONLY!
FRI., FEB. 21, 1975-8 P.M.-POWER CENTER
Advance sales: PTP Ticke Office, Mendelssohn Lobby
764-0450

j

IS THERE '
A PERSONAL
GOD? HAS HE
SPOKEN TO
YOU?
!',D ANSW' ERS--
'tcorrespond~-
tr- Torah, the
h,:oks of Moes.
Nev Testament
in English and
Yiddishalso
availableth-
c.it chrge.
P.0: Box 1048
Rochester, N.Y.
14603

i
i
i
i
I
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i
s
E
I

BACH'S COMPLETE CYCLE WILL BE PLAYED OVER
TWO EVENINGS-THREE EACH EVENING
Tues., Feb. 4th and Thurs., Feb. 6th
At the First Congregational Church
State &i William
MINIMUM SUGGESTED DONATION: $2.00
Presented as a Benefit Concert for Sunfield
Home for Mentally Handicopped Children

IN LESS
THAN A MONTH
Ann Arbor will be
rocking with
-

MIC
THE
A spar
Williac

Every Monday and
Tuesday Nite
BEER NITE
Pitcher Beer-1A price
No cover for Students
WED.-FREE PINBALL NITE
THURS.-TEQUILA NITE
341 S. MAIN
HAEL CURTIZ FESTIVAL 1933
E KENNEL MURDER CASE
rtsman is murdered and there are seven suspects to choose from-
m Powell ("the thin man") as Philo Vance, S.S. Van Dine's fam-
- ,, _ I t - _ . . _ I A . A -... .- 4 - :. L :- r v

Spring Break-DAYTONA BEACH
FL.ORIDA!.
e FEB. 28-MARCH 9
e INCLUDES ALL TRANSPORTATION
" INCLUDES ALL ACCOMMODATIONS
* 8 DAYS-7 NIGHTS IN DAYTONA
* FREE PARTIES WHILE TRAVELING
* DISNEY WORLD OPTIONS

* 2 FREE B-B-QUES
TOTAL PRICE
$1535o

IN DAYTONA
LIMITED
ACCOMMODATIONS
Sign up Early

No Gas Worries

f r-i 1

-.

I

I TI AANIMPHI

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