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January 10, 1975 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-10

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, January 10, 1975I

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, January 10, 1975

ROTC
(Continued from Page 1)
GRUNZKE, whose Air Force
program includes 69 students
this year agreed, saying, "Cred-
it is one of the factors to low
enrollment."
However, ROTC junior and
Student Government Council
(SGC) member Bob Matthews
said, "Most people in ROTC
aren't going to drop out of it
or stay in on the basis of
credit."
According to Irish and Grun-
zke, the Defense Department
requires that about 20 students
be enrolled in the junior class.
If that quota is not met, the
unit is placed on probation and
dissolved if it fails to muster up
the minimum.
SINCE THERE are only 12
juniors enrolled in Army and
13 in Air Force, both units ex-
pect some kind of reprimand
from their headquarters.
Irish predicted, "The Defense
Department will probably place

requests

academic credit China expert predicts Mao's

us on evaluation and tell us
that unless we reach viability
by next year we will be, re-
moved from campus."
Grunzke struck an optimistic
note saying, "Because of the
positive outlook right now with
enrollment for next year and
hopefully, with the positive at-
titude about gaining credit,
they (the Defense Dept.) will
delay action until next year."
IN CONTRAST to the dwin-
dling Army and Air Force en-
rollments, the number of stu-
dents opting for Navy ROTC
has remained fairly constant.
According to Captain William
Rigot, Navy has fewer units
throughout the country than the
other two groups, a major fac-
tor contributing to its higher
enrollment - 98 students this
year.
However, Navy has experi-
enced some decline, which Ri-
got attributes to the lack of
credit and to the "general feel-

a

ing of the public towards the
military."
Rigot said, "We're not in any
real trouble with enrollment,"
but he added, "We might get
pre-Vietnam level enrollment
back up without credit, bit it
will happen faster with credit."
Irish asserted, "For enroll-
ment to go higher and 'o be
viable we need the University
behind us."
Irish blasted the LSA faculty
as "anti-military," a d d i nag,
"We're not asking them to get
up on a bandwagon, but we
don't want a stumbling block."
HE CHARGED, "By denying
credit they're saying, 'Don't
waste your time on ROTC; it's
Mickey Mouse.' "
But Grunzke disagreed, "The
faculty has always been cordial
and understanding," he said.
Unwilling to characterize the
entire faculty as either pro or
anti-military Associate Dean of
Academic Affairs Charles Mor-
ris said, "There was a range
of viewpoints within the faculty
when I heard them five years
ago. I haven't heard it discussed
recently, but I presume we
still have a range."
MORRIS dismissed the via-
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bility argument as "not very
relevant," adding, "My decision
will be based on the courses'
academic merit."
However, he said that the
faculty as a whole "may look at
the issue in other lights."
Irish also faulted the faculty's
lack of understanding of "what
we teach or how we operate."
Associate Dean of Academic
Counseling Marion Jacson de-
fended the faculty's lack of
awareness explaining, "There
are too many programs to keep
up with everything. They're not
singling out ROTC."
ALL THREE commanding of-
ficers praised the sub-commit-
tee's objectivity and thorough-
ness in examining their pro-
grams strictly on academic
merits.
Grunzke asserted, "They're
intent on being fair-that's en-
couraging."
The four sub-committee mem-
bers declined comment on their
upcoming recommendation until
the report is presented to the
Curriculum Committee at an
open meeting on Tuesday.
ALTHOUGH Rigot and Irish
refused to predict whether the
committee would recommend
that credit be reinstated, Irish
declared, "Part of our problem
is that the faculty reflects what
the students want. They're
afraid of a few radicals and
what they'll do if credit is re-
instated. That's all it was before
and that's all it takes."
A
PERFECT
MATCH.
PUT THE LIFE
OUT OF YOUR MATCHES
BEFORE THEY PUT THE UFE
-OUT OF YOUR FORESTS.

Rigot said, "I have no idea successor,
what will happen when it comes
to the faculty. We have friends By DAVID WHITING
there and people who don't like ByRdAiDkWHITING
us." Dr. Roderick MacFarquhar,
However, he added, "The s t- one of the world's leading
uation is less emotional now authorities on contemporary
than in 1969. We'll have a more China, predicted last night that
objective look." Wang Hung-wan, the second
ranking vice chairman of the
ON THE assumption that the Chinese Central Committee, will
Curriculum Committee would ' be the next leader of the Peo-E
recommend that some courses ples Republc of Chma.
receive credit Morris speculated Speaking to a crowd of 400 in
that the faculty would amend the Rackham Amphitheatre,
their 1969 action. "I guess that MacFarquhar a labor member
on academic grounds a good of British Parliament, also
case can be made," he said. warned of turbulent years ahead
Morris cites two points in for Mao-tse Tung's successor.
ROTC's favor. "Some >f the "WANG," said MacFarquhar
courses look impressive and "wul d c asohrqan
some have legitimate academic .would not face a smooth tran-
content," he explained. "Also sition in the event of Mao's
the courses were more biased death," because of his youth,
in 1969 than is now the case." inexperience, and lack of con-
ROTC courses submitted for fidence. a
examination include Principals Mao, 82 years ald and leader
of Military Team Management, of the Chinese Communist Par-
National Security Structure, Mil- ty for the past forty years, is
itary History, Amphibious War- grooming Wang to be China's
fare, and Concepts of Leader- econd national leader, Mac-
fare an Cocept ofLeaer-Farquhar believes.
ship. Wang's succession could lead
ACCORDING to Irish, all to some changes within China,
ROTC faculty are rigorously
evaluated by a special commit-
tee appointed by President !Q-tW O
Fleming, who ultimateLy ap-
proves all appointments.
Grunzke described Fleming's
attitude towards ROTC as "ver.. lea ves b(
positive." Fleming was out of lv
town and could not be reached

For example U. S. - Chinese re-
lations would not necessarily be-
come more hostile, but they
could proceed at a slower pace,
he maintained.
"WANG does not have the
self confidence to shake hands
with Nixon," said MacFarqu-
har. "Not like a man of the
enormous prestige of Mao."
In the turmoil following Mao's
death, MasFarquhar suspects
that some members of the Chi-
nese PolitBuro will lose their
positions, "But there would be
little actual fighting," he added.
"The military would give
their tacit support to Wang,"
predicted MacFarquhar, "but
as he has a youth and worker
constituency, he is looked upon
with suspicion by the military."
"THERE will always be a
memory of the Curtural Revolu-
tion and the military's stepping
in," he said; it was the Chinese
youth who created much chaos
during the Cultural Revolution,

"Wang appears radically in-
clined," according to MacFar-
quhar, but "he cannot rely on
the radicals alone to run the
country." MacFarquhar be-
lieves that Wang has enough
political savvy to become more
moderate.
However, he admitted that
"whoever succeeds the Chair-
man will not have the confi-
dence to launch another Cultur-
al Revolution."
MacFarquhar also predicted
that within the next 25 years,
the British would leave Hong
Kong, a British Crown Colony,
to the Communists. He empha-
sized, "everyone there, even
the refugees, know the colony
is on borrowed time."
He believes that the "Com-
munist Party will regain some
of the dominance and prestige
it had in the late fifties and
early sixties," in the next' dec-
ade.

warns of turmoil
and in it's foreign relations, necessitating the military to re-
MacFarquhar e x p l a i n e d. store order.

od teachers' strike
hind bitter legacy

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for comment.((continued from Page 1) nacik, said "we don't do a god-
The commanding officers un- had previously taught. Their damn thing in school." He felt
derscored the importance of a frustration was fed by the be- that the strike, and the weeks
military composed of offi:ers lief that the firings have denied of lost classes would probably
trained at civilian institutions as their right to bargain collective- ruin his chances of getting into
well as academies in avaiding ly. college. "I'm sure those teach-
a "military caste system." Non-union t e a c h e r s were ers would have a fit if their
taunted with boos and cries of kids were out of school,' he
IRISH declared, "If this is a "scab!" as they crossed the said. "All they think about is
great university, we need these picket lines. their pay."
graduates in the Army. They One of the striikng teachers
bring diverse views into the LEONARD FRITZ, an mndus- picketing outside of Crestwood
Army and keep it honest." trial arts teacher at Iiiston High School, co-op program co-
Irish added, "ROTC is good Junior High School, amplified ordinator Tom Nowak was ask-
for the country and for the his verbal abuse at the non- ed how his classes would make
Army. It keeps society in tune strikers with an electric bull- up lost time. "We'll just have
with the Army and the Army in horn. to cut out some of the wasted
tune with society." "They're having lunch meat time. But they'll get their ma-
After the sub-committee sub- at the cafeteria today, and terial."
mits its report to the Cdrricu- they're calling it scab meat," Not all of the Crestwaod
l'Im Committee, a recomme Tla- yelled Fritz at one woman walk- teachers left their jobs. One of
tion will go to the Executive ing into the school.--- --
Committee and be debated by Fritz voiced his disgust at!O il
the LSA faculty at its February his replacement. "He couldn't
meeting. According to Morris, even measure an eighth inch hit
if the faculty votes to canuge wit ha sixteenth inch ruler," he
the faculty code, the Regents said. "It makes you cry if talk
would have to approve the you're an educator and you Zee aitsS
action. this crap."

'

I .a

Sunday at HILLEL: January 12
Grad & Undergrad Brunch I1 a.m.
Lox, Bagels, and Conversation
SPEAKERS-Tikve Kensky, Frymer
"Why Study the Acient World"
75c per person

ANOTHER Haston tea.her,
Madeline Milidonis, c h a rg e d
that parents, who staff some
classes at the school, "are
bringing in TVs and the kids
are watching soap operas.'
Most of the Crestwood pupils
are dissatified with the learning
situation under their new teach-
ers. John Regan, a junior high
pupil said that in the classes
staffed by mothers, "all w3 do
is goof around."
Older students seemed even
more disgruntled by the situa-
tion. Andrea Hawes, a senior
at Crestwood High S c n o o I
blamed the striking teachers
for the trouble. "If they raise
teacher's pay, the taxes go up.
They're depriving us of our edu-
cation."
ANOTHER senior, Jamie Ber-

I.
C
1
{

DELI1-5:30
All You Can Eat and

stall

to 7:30 p.m.
One Free Coke for $2

All at HILLEL
1429 HILL 663-3336

(Continued from Page 1)
hour in each of three years of
a new contract and immediate
increases of 50 cents an hour
to offset inflation. The compan-
ies have offered about 60 cents
in the first year and 50 cents
in the second year of a two-year
proposal, Grospiron said.
OIL WORKERS now make
about $5.95 an hour.
Grospiron said the union will
accept no less than a three-year
pact. Picketing continued yes-
terday at two refineries and an
asphalt plant in the Port Arthur,
Tex., area for the second day
and also at a refinery in El
Segundo, Calif.
Those 6,000 workers walked
out when the contracts expired.
Grospiron said the strike was
illegal, but no action would be
taken against the union mem-
bers.
However, at Port Arthur a
local union spokesman said,
"this is a legal strike."
Companies involved in the ne-
gotiations are Texaco, Gulf,
Phillips, Mobil, Shell, Atlantic-
Richfield, Continental, the sev-
eral Standards and many small-
er companies. Exxon, the na-
tion's largest refiner, has only
one plant covered by the union.

them, a teacher's aid who work-
ed in the Haston school library,
said she was not worried about
the angry picket lines, but was
concerned over what the stu-
dents could think of their for-
mer teachers.
"They've (the students) lost
respect for these people," she
said, walking through the school
door as the strikers yelled in
her direction.
The antagonism and bitterness
resulting from the Crestwood
school strike has had its effect
on all levels of this community.
As Judge G e o r g e Bowles
handed down his decision re-
voking the teaching firings, he
remarked "this is a dispute
where there are no winners."
SGC pres.
may resign
(Continued from Page 1)
and when Sandberg quits hi
post.
Council Treasurer Elliot Chi
kofsky, who is widely described
as seeking the SGC presidency
himself, last night spoke in
terms suggesting Sandberg's
resignation is a foregone conclu-
sion.
"He's accomplished a lot dur-
ing the time he has been in of-
fice," Chikofsky said. "He filed
the lawsuits against Gill and the
others. But we have to move on
from cleaning up SGC and start
doing something for the stu-
dents - which we haven't been
doing recently. He (Sandberg)
accomplished what he was
needed for, but that need no
longer exists."
AlTENTIOF

r

classroom instruction in
electronic music
the music
studio
Now accepting students for winter term

Ply .- i '1 ,.......1. ........... _ __..._ .. .._ .. a_. _ ._ i i

11

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