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February 01, 1975 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-02-01

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Poge Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, February 1, l'9r,

UNIVERSITY OF MICHGANTHEATRE PROGRAM
BREADatd RSES

WEDNESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY,
FEBRUARY5. 6,7,8, 12758:00P.M.
THE ROWER CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS
~ $
r ~D
AACESALE AND INFORMATiON.
TICKET OFFiCE ,MENDELSSOHN LOBBY, 764-0450
TICKE TS NOW ON SALE
Read and Use Da ily Classif ieds
A Speciol Offer!
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NEWSPAPER

Court rules Nixon
tapes belong to govt.
(Continued from Page 1) 6 to hear arguments on the
at 2 a.m. and that he was not three-judge issue.
aware that the appeals court The appeals court order, in
was about to act. effeCt, leaves the case in a
It was early evening when state where no papers can be
the appeals court issued the moved. It also may prevent the
stay, signed by Judges Mal- S p e c i a 1 Prosecutor's Of-
coim Wilkey and Spottswood fice from implementing an
IRobinson. In the meantime, agreement with President Ford
Richey set a hearing for Feb. giving the prosecutors access
to them.
j THE presidential transition
seiOsI act provides for such expenses
as moving papers to Nixon's
(Continued from Page 1) San Clemente, Calif., home. But
troleum Corp. authority expires Feb. 9, six
BABCOCK, Republican gover-. months after .Nixon's resigna-
nor of Montana from 1962 to tion.
1969, was a Washington vice If the case lingers in the
president of Occidental at the courts past that date, Nixon
time the contribution was made may have to pay for trans-
in the fall of 1972. porting such items that may be
Judge Hart said before sen- declared his property.
tencing, 'Mr. Babcock, in your The former President had
case it was not some untutored asked Richey to force the Ford
underling who had to dance to administration to comply with
the tune of a boss," an agreement signed last Sept.
Hart noted the 55-year-old 7. That agreement would have
Babcock is independently wveal- made Nixon custodian with sole
thy and said, "You could have right of access to the presiden-
told Mr. Hammer you had no. tial materials and tapes.
intention of assisting him in Still pending before Richey
breaking the law." is a suit by Nixon asking that a
"WHEN you broke the law three-judge District Court panel
you knew you were breaking it consider his constitutional chal-
-and thereafter you tried to coy- Ilenge to a law passed by the
er it up until such time that last Congress that would give
you got before the grand jury," Icustody of his papers and tapes
the juidge said. to the government.

U' says Regents
seletedCobb

(Continued from Page 1)
IN THE initial motion for
Frye, the Regents opposed him
5-3-.-
Women's Commission Chair-
woman Eunice Burns, who met
with Fleming and Rhodes yes-
terday to discuss the issue,
complained that neither the
meeting nor the official state-
Javits,
(Continued from Page 1)
chance then," he continued, "is I
if there is a massive indication I
of public support for it, through
something like a letter-writing
campaign."'
Stroup took a different view
of the fate of the legislation
"If we don't have it this year,"
he predicted, "we'll have it
next year before the election.
The Republicans don't want it
to be a campaign issue."
He added, "It will be easier
to pass in the House than in the
Senate because of all the new
members."
THE MARIJUANA reformist
indicated that a "civil fine" pot
bill, which would discontinue
the categorization of pot of-
fenses as felonies, may soon be
introduced in Congress.
"It's our feeling," Stroup
said, "that we have a shot at
passing a civil fine bill if we
get a conservative co-sponsor
like Goldwater or Buckley.
Those two in particular aren't
sympathetic, but the Republi-
cans tend to like that bill."
"The possibilities of mari-
juana legislation passing have
improved since last year," not-
ed an aide to Javits. "There
has been better response in
terms of being able to find co-
sponsors for the bills."
But a spokesman for Senate
Majority Leader Mike Mans-
fil (.Mont) avse tha

ment did much to elucidate
questions surrounding the na-
ture of the University's offer
to Cobb.
Burns said Rhodes refused to
answer questions unless the
Minority Commission, Affirma-
tive Action and Women's Com-
mission members present could
guarantee complete confiden-
tiality.
ACCORDING to Burns, when
the group did not agree to share
the administration's no - com-
ment policy, the meeting "went
around and a r ou n d" and
Fem'ing and Rhodes"would not
sa what kind of offer Cobb had
received or what role the Re-
gents had played in the nego-
tiations.
Burns said, "I can't remem-
ber any question being really
confirmed."
She labeled the administra-
tion's tight clamp on informa-
tion "an uniusual silence ...
P e o p 1 e generally dissatisfied
with the press statement."
CONCERNED faculty mem-
bers, Affirmative Action, Mi-
nority Commission, Women's
Commission, and Black Facult
have blasted the University's
two year, no-departmental-ten-
iire offer to Cobb asa clear vio-
lation of affirmative a c t i o n
policies.
In yesterday's statement, the
administration answered, "We
have been conscious from the
ouitset of the sensitiivty of this
appointment with regards to af-
firmative, action and are pre-
pared to support our action pub-
licly, should this be necessary."'
Burns yesterday demanded
"immediate public explana-
tion. Coordinator of minority
affairs Retha Flowers, who was
similarly dissatisfied with yes-
terday's official statement was
disturbed that the administra-
tion's contract to Cobb as re.-
ported in the Daily does not
show a commitment to affirm-.
ative action
----.-..- -~

the yar saes wise, Pand tht
busineass wisiely n thet
comings wekst wieor winthut
then rebaes wt rwtot
"We e'llte coigit u
spr l oing maktafe nht" Sila
sai. "Pet jutr don'," liea to
buyd. "newp casr adtnen drive to
ou nerad theesaltevroads.
om e sautodrhats. sea
exeson auo therebatse gam
axsaikofel possbity. rOnea
Chsler lesange psiis ce-
tainythat ste industry illr-
einth ete idory evlop a
new scheme to get people into
the showrooms.
"THEY'VE invested a lot of

range of opinion on the merits
of the rebate program.
"I still think the cars are
overpriced," said a woman out-
side of Jacobsons. "It's just a
gimmick"
A window washer on Main
Street who said he was not in
the market now, but added that
"anyone who doesn't take ad-
vantage of it is foolish."
Another man concluded that a
few hundred dollars was insig-
nificant when 'the. prices 'have
gone up so much. "Besides," he
said, "these rebates are only
for small cars, and I wouldn't
drive my family in one of them.
I don't think they're safe. I like

1Rebate plans boost
sagging auto sales

vertising,"' he said. "I'm sure
they'll do something to keep
prices down."
Most of the dealers surveyed
insisted that times were never
that bad in the city before the
rebates were introduced. A cou-
ple reported good Decembers,
and blamed a scare-mongering
press for the fact that it was
not better.
"I'd just as soon you people
businss and stuck to tenews,"
proclaimed one angry manager
of a Buick dealership. "Business
is good and it always has been I
good."
IT MAY be that the city is
not the best place to examine I
the effects of the rebates be-
cause of the fairly stable eco.-
nomic base generated by the
Unversity.
A spokesperson for the Wash-
tenaw County. Department of
Social Services indicated that
the city's unemployment rate
is less directly effected by au-j
tomotive industry layoffs than
outlying communities such as
Miltn, Dexter, and Saline. "I
would say that it is less so in
Ann Arbor," said the spokes-
person. .
An informal survey of city
consumers revealed a wide

(Continui

read
oute

ed from Page 1)

I CHANCES

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PRESENTS

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A LMA NAC 1975

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Judge frees Colson
after seven month

*Tuition. The GEO has pro-
posed that all of their mem-
bers pay a $200 per term fee
in lieu of tuition, effective
January, 1975. The University
has offered to freeze the pres-
ent tuition rate for all GSAs
with more than a ten-hour work
load per week. The University
tuition pronosal would cost $1.5
million. The union demand
would approximately double
that.
* Agency shop. The union has
demanded this clause which
they claim is standard for any
labor contract, and indeed, the
University has grantedl it to
the other unions on campus. An
agency shop clause provides
that the employer deducts a
service fee, to be paid to the
union, from the paychecks of
all GSAs whlo are not union
members. The service fee,
which is agreed upon by the
GEO, cannot exceed the amount
of dues for certified union mem-
hers. The University has re-
frwsed to agree to the proposal
because, they claim, the un-
ion does no t have a large
enongh rmembership to justify
it. The GEO claims otherwise,
nd dd' thatth ifnnio n Gt ts
sho'ild mnake a contribution to
the bargaining unit; and
* Non - discrimination. The
union demands that there be no
discrimination used in hiring
or firing of employees on the
bsis of ag, rae cred olor,
sexual preference. The Univer.
sity has agreed to all but the
last stip-lation, on the grounds
that sexual preference is a pri-
vate matter which has no place
in a labor contract. The GEO
claims that the University
team has taken a discrimina-
tory nosition on the matter,
'and that it cnnnot distinguish
hetweeri seva1 nreference and
sexua criminaliy:
saturday,********** February*1

Jr. Walker & The Alistors

together with the
MOJO BOOGIE BAN D
Feb. 3 at 8:00 p.m.
$3.00 AT DOOR ONLY

994-55

it oul bemer ihu thnk I (Continued from Page 1) 'er-up trIal which endied witn the
ing to expect new Congressional posed in other Watergate cases conviction of four other Nixon
marijuana legislation to pass in on former close Nixon associ- aides, including three who were
the next few years. "The pre- ates John Dean, Jeb Magrud- considered the former Presi-
ponderant feeling," he said, "is er and Herbert Kalmbach. dent's closest associates. They
that those matters should be 'All three were prosecution have not been sentenced.
left up to the states." witnesses in the Watergate coy- COLSON HAD been a m o n g
~ ~ ~ those originally indicted in the
charged in connection with the
'Seuotember, 1971, break-i at the
50c 'jFF offce of a psychiatrist who
Shad treated Pentagon papers
REGUIA R PIZZA defendant Daniel Ellsberg.
REGU IAll the charges were dropped
REGULARLY $2.50 and in return Colson entered a
,guilty plea to obstruction of
7~Am '~~Ejustice in the break-in. He was
1J~j ~I '~ sentenced on June 21, 1974, and
4Abegan serving his term on July
LARGE PIZZA (s8
REGULRLY $.75ile no details were imme-
RFGULRLY 2.75diately available of Colson 's
family problems, he filed a pe-
Includes Mozzerello Cheese & Sauce +. tition for a reduced sentence
EACHADDTIONL IEM 4c ~last October 7 citing his fath-
t EACH DD T ION AL IT EM40cer's death and his mother's de-
ONON-LESHMBRGR pendence on him as her only
--HAM-LINK SAUSAGE--BACON- son.
-GREEN. PEPPERS-MUSHROOMS-PEPPERONI-
SERVED DAILY 3-9 P.M. thru FEB. 28th counsel to President Nixon and
during his years in the White
OLYM IC RSTAU ANT House gained a reputation as a
t tough Nixon loyalist.
221 N. MAIN He once said he would walk
over his grandmother if it
4,~4t~.e e g g tjjwould help to re-elect Nixon.

wuo t: romy theMidary: Mr
Tlay CalendarEn)
in ns & t. sacha U. of Ci
cago. "Oil & Political Development
In the Middit East." & "Our Ee
gv Options: So what Else is New?'"
10 am Humanities Lecture: Pericles
-rin Fehem, "Periles The
Gymnastics: UJM vs. Ohio State,
Crisler Arena, 1 pm.
planetarium: Audiencereusd
Mus",ic School: Ave Ordmnr
bone recital, Recital Hall, 8 pm.

59

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THE MIChIGAN PAILY
Volnife LXXXV, No. 10?
Saturday, February 1, 1975
Is edited and managed by studente
at the University of Michigan. NeW~
phone 764-0562. Second class postagt
paid at Ann Arbor. Michigan 481 06J
Published d a I I y Tuesday throngt
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SOMETHING
NEW
IS COMING TO
RfOW

In the time it takes to drive
your friend home, you could save
bis life.,
If your friend's been drinking
too mnnch. he shouldn't be drivin2.

for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take ten minutes,.Or twenty.
Or an hour. Drive your friend
home. That's all. If you can't do

rDRUNK DRIVER, DEPT.Y*
IBOX 2345 1
I ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852 1
SI want to save a friend's life.

'VI

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