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January 30, 1975 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-30

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Thursday, January 30, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PQge Three

TH..HGAAL Pg he

AP Photo
A TEAM OF demolition experts delicately rem ove a bomb from a government buildjag in Oak-
land, California. Members of the leftist group, Weather Underground, claimed responi bility for
the bomb.
Demolition experts detonate
ticking bomb in Oakland.

PLO un
By AP and Reuter
The Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization unveiled on Wednes-
day a "correction center"
where it said it holds 70 Pales-
tinians disciplined by the or-
ganization.
It was the first eyewitness re-
port of such a jail although the
PLO has been claiming for
some time that it is discipliningI
dissident guerrillas by using itsI
own courts and prisons.
Ziad Abdel Fattah, an official
of the PLO news agency Wafa,
conducted newsmen on a tour
of the prison, a converted two-I
story villa in the farming vil-
lage of Manoura, 10 miles out-;
side Damascus. Abdel Fattah
claimed the Manoura prison
was only one of several PLO
penal institutions. He said the
70 prisoners at Manoura were
being held for various offenses
"from drunkenness to spying
for Israel."
IN GENERAL, however, littleI
is known about the fate of Arab
hijackers and terrorists, many
of whom have been freed from
jails around the world by Pales-
tinian gunmen. Some have been
turned over to the PLO, but few
are thought to be inprison.
The Manoura prison was
guarded by members of the
PLO's internal police force
armed with automatic weapons
and pistols.
Two prisoners introduced to
the newsmen were identified as
Chawkat Youssef and Youssef
" Saleh Hassan. Abdel Fattah
said they were members of a
Cl THE MICHIGAN DAILY
e Volume LXXXV, No. 100
Thursday, January 30, 1975
is edited and managed by students
e at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
g paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i 1 y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
:r sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
0$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
S non-local mail (other states and
e foreign).
n Sumnmer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
n(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non.
local mail (other states and foreign)

five-man group captured in the
Persian Gulf sheikhdom of Du-{
bai last September.
ABDEL FATTAH said they
were planning to hijack a Brit-
ish jetliner at Dubai and holdI
the passengers hostage for jail-
ed Palestinian guerrillas in
other countries, but were caught
before they acted.
The Palestinian spokesman
said the five were sentenced to
7 to 15 years in prison under a
PLO code drawn up in 1974. He
said the code includes the death
penalty for crimes like hijack-
ing.
In another development in
the tense Middle East situation,
President Anwar Sadat an-
nounced yesterday that Egypt
would buy French Mirage fight-
er - bombers to build up its de-
pleted air force, but he also
said that for the first time in
26 years peace was now possi-
ble in the Middle East.
THE SITUATION in the Mid-I
dle East remained explosive, he
said, and to defuse it Israel
would have to withdraw on all
three fronts: Sinai, the Golan
Heights and the west bank of
the Jordan River.
Egypt was ready to sign a
peace agreement and accept Is-
rael's right to live inside guar-I
anteed borders, he said.
President Sadat, who com-
pleted two days of talks here
with French President Valery!
Giscard D'Estaing Tuesday,
told a news conference before
RACING BIG IN JAMAICA
KINGSTON, Jamaica (P) -
Horse racing is popular in Ja-
maica. The best course in the
country is at Caymanas Park,
considered to be one of the
most beautiful in the Carib-
'bean.
It is located seven miles from
Kingston and has racing most
weekends through the year.

leaving for home yesterday that
France had agreed to sell Egypt
its Mirage F-1 combat air-
craft.
T H E EGYPTIAN leader
declined to specify how many
of the supersonic French air-
planes Egypt would buy, but
said the number would be far
less than the 120 estimated by
some officials here as the max-
imum needed to make up
Egypt's losses during the Octo-
ber, 1973 war.
The Egyptian leader said in:
response to a question that he
agreed with the view of U. S.
Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer that the Israeli and
Egyptian positions on a peace
settlement were reconcilable,
but re-emphasized that Israel
must be ready to achieve
peace.

iveils prison

N

A Series of Informal Talks/Discussions on

MINI-COURSE 411
Succession Crises-East and West
LECTURE BY
GREY HODNETT, York University
"AFTER BREZHNEV, WHO?-
Succession in the Soviet Union"
FRIDAY, Jan. 31-4:00 pOm.
Room 200-LANE HALL
For sign-up information, please contact the Center for
Russian and East European Studies, 764-0351

BITEHNI

OAKLAND, Calif. (I)-Helmeted demolition
experts placed a ticking bomb in a metal tub,
carried the device into the street, then set it
off with an explosion yesterday that rocked the
area around the federal building.
"That's it! That's the big one!" police officers
yelled after the blast. No one was injured.
"IT WAS TICKING. When they moved it first,
it stopped ticking. Then they moved it again,
and it started again," said Charles Nixon,
spokesman for the Alcohol, Tax and Firearms
office here.
The bomb, in an attache case, had been
planted in the George Miller Federal Building
here. The demolition men placed the bomb in
the protective metal tub suspended by ropes.
Then they gingerly carried the tub outside,
removed the bomb, covered it with metal

blankets, and set it off.i
An estimated 10 to 15 pounds of explosives
were packed in the attache case.
THE LEFTIST, antiwar Weather Underground
had claimed responsibility for pl inting th
device on the seventh floor.
Agents found the bomb ticking in The attach
case above the false ceiling panels in a seventh
floor Navy office. They had entered t'e building
-scene of violent antiwar protests ii i the 1960;
against the Armed Forces Inducti on Centei
housed there-shortly after 6 a.m.
An explosives-sniffing dog from the San Mate(
County sheriff's office became agitat ed on th(
seventh floor but could not pinpoint th a locatior
of the bomb, Nixon said.

RECENTRALIZATION
as a Desirable Pattern of Socio-economic Evolution
by PETER VAN DRESSER
What patterns of settlement, resource-use and technology would best
promote ecological adaptation by society? Can an organization of com-
petent, self-provisioning communities and regionol groupings sustain them-
selves primarily by skilled and conservative management of biotic pro-
cesses and flow-energies, rather than by overdraft on fossil fuels and
high-energy technics?
Mr. Van Dresser, together with Florence Van Dresser at the first three
sessions, will explore the answers to these questions.

I

It was found in a
728 which houses
Agency.

ceiling panel outs ide Room
the Defense Ccntracting

i;
i
r
1

Korean boats sunk
on Mekong River

I

PHNOM PENH, Cambodia ({)
-- Rebel Khmer Rouge gunners
sank two fuel tankers and set
another ablaze Wednesday as a
16-vessel convoy sought to run
the Mekong River "shooting gal-
lery" with supplies for the
blockaded Cambodian capital of
Phnom Penh, port authorities
reported.
The officials had no imme-
diate casualty reports from the
attacks. However, shipping
sources said most of the crew-
men from the sunken ships
were rescued by Cambodian
navy boats escorting the con-
voy through the gantlet of fire
from gunners entrenched on
the river banks.
TWO SOUTH K 0 R E A N
tankers, the Boo Hoeung 7 and

Han Soeung 2, were sunk by
insurgent fire five miles up-
river from Neak Luong naval
base and 32 miles southeast of
the capital, the sources said.
The Vira 4, registered in Pana-
ma and Hong Kong-owned, was'
set on fire, the sources added.;
The convoy of five freighters,I
four fuel tankers and seven
barges was the third and larg-'
est to attempt the run to be-
leaguered Phnom Penh since
Khmer Rouge forces blocked
the Mekong River lifeline a
month ago. All roads into the
capital have been cut for
months, and the insurgents con-
trol about 40 miles of the river
banks beginning at a point 15
miles southeast of Phnom Penh.

Growi hg Up Jewish in
20th Century Germany
ANOTHER
HILLEL WEEKEND RETREAT
Friday, Fe b. 7-Sunday, Feb. 9 {
at Camp Tamarak
WITH RESOURCE Pf OPLE:
DR. ALFRED JOSF 'E DR. ALFRED MEYER
PROF. YEHUDAH REINHARZ DR. MAX KAPUSTIN
COST $12.50
CALL 663-3336
SPON O! ED BY U. OF MICHIGAN
AND MI CHIGAN STATE HILLEL'S

" V
~AN ALL.NEWS'
MUSICAL REVUE
EAST QUAD AUD. &OOPM.
ADVANETICKETSAM
A P76H696 6-PM -
A PEAtCHY CREAMY PRcADucTION

DATE
Tuesday, Jan. 28
Wednesday, Jan. 29
Thursday, Jan. 30
Wednesday, Feb. 5
Thursday, Feb. 6
Friday, Feb. 7

Sponsored and financially supported by Survival-Plus Seminar; College
of Architecture and Urban Planning; Douglas and Margaret Crary;
Office of Ethics and Religion; UAC Future Worlds: Pilot Program;
Program in Engineering for Public Systems; Residential College;
Science, Technology, and Future Societies Faculty Seminar.

TIME
3:15-5:00
3:15-5:00
7:30-10:00
3:15-5:00
7:30-10:00
3:15-5:00

PLACE
Rackham Amphitheatre
Residential Coll. Ad.
Rackham Amphitheatre
2104 Art & Arch. Bldt.(N.C.)
Rackham Amphitheatre
Residential Coll. Aud.

t __

,

i
i

WON"
e

Dr. Bop arid the Headliners
featuring
THE WCHITE RAVEN

FP
~y
V ______
1 ' n'r"- y

I

THURY DAY, JAN. 30

DOORS OPEN 8:00
MEMBERSHIP CARD $2.50 public, $2.00 students
It's our move now CHANCES ARE
5'I6E. LIBERTY
SOPH SHOW UAC TRAVEL
IUniversity Activities Center >
is now accepting applications for
Pee1975-1976 Senior Officer positonsZ
resident* Coordinating Vice President v
* Chief Financial Officer " Public Reirtions 9
Vice Preeslent
WANTED: Students to maintain a c rea tive and

It takes a special
breed of cat...
to work for Scott. All are carefully hand picked, with backgrounds as diverse as you'would expect to
find in a company that encourages individuality and initiative. But they all share one thing in common.
They demand excellence, of themselves and of SCOTT.
For each of them, SCOTT has been a good place to grow. To explore new opportunities, divisions and
functions. And to match their skills against new challenges.
Our decentralized management system puts every employee right where he or she can learn and con-
tribute the most . . right where decisions are made, problems solved and opportunities explored.
It's not likely that any organization, large or small, will have everything you're looking for. But if the basics
are there, an important deciding factor should be whether you'll have the opportunity to shape your own
career in a way that suits your talents, interests and needs, as well as the organization's goals.

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