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January 26, 1975 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1975-01-26

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, January 26, 1975

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, January 26, '1975

alers

estro

ANN 1%,
d ..dop.14 Ink
.ekel s

'Cats crushed,
Kupec's 26 le

79-58;

ads way

Gophers blank Moretto;
Michigan icers fall, 5-2

By AL HRAPSKY
Michigan outclassed an
erratic and uncoordinated
Northwestern quintet, out-
scoring the Wildcats 26-4
in a ten minute period -,of
the first half to record its
fourth Big Ten victory, 79-
58, at Crisler Arena yester-
day afternoon.-
In what began as a close
game, Michigan matched
the, Wildcats almost basket
for basket in the initial
eight minutes, tying the
score six times before un-
leashing a devastating scor-
ing spree.
Led by the shooting and re-
bounding of Wayman Britt and
C. J. Kupec, the Wolverines
steadily increased the lead from
18-16 at the 12:01 mark to 46-26
at the end of the first half.
The Wildcats never really
threatened after the Michigan
surge. The game lapsed into a
boring display of foul-filled and
at times comical basketball in
the final period.
A relaxed Johnny Orr com-
mented on his team's uninspired
second half play.
"When you're ahead by 20
points at the half," he said,
"it's hard to maintain momen-
tum. I guess we played a little

lackadaisically." Garnering 10
of Michigan's first 18 points,
Britt looked as though he
would surpass his previous
season high of 24. But a turned
ankle forced him to the bench
with 9:28 remaining in the
initial stanza.
Although only slightly ,prain-
ed, Britt's ankle hampered his
effectiveness. He managed to
score only six additional points
in the second half to finish
with 16 and 6 rebounds.
"I couldn't get loose and had
problems moving around," Britt
said, "It's just a twist and I
should be ready for the game
Monday night."
6-8 Wildcat center Jim Wal-
lace, who ranked third in per-
sonal fouls per game in the
Big Ten last year with a 4.36
average, fouled out with 14:55
left in the last half, reducing
Northwestern's rebounding
power.
The Maize and Blue executed
the fast break to near perfec-
tion in the first half but at one
point had problems converting
it into baskets.
"We've had trouble with that
in the last few games, but I
think that we've improved alot,"
Kupec said. "Once in a while
you're going to get burned."
Kupec led all scorers with
26 points, took game honors with
10 rebounds, and consistently

sparked the Michigan fast
break.
Defensively, the Wolverines
turned in a stellar perform-
ance that resulted in the low-
est point total they have al-
lowed a Big Ten team this
year.
The Michigan zone press
forced Northwestern to commit
16 turnovers and disrupted their
offensive patterns. Orr said that
the press was executed just as
well in Minnesota last week but
"instead of throwing the ball
away, they (the Gophers) just
knocked us down and ran over
us."
In the last five minutes of
the game, the Wolverines awak-
ened from what had seemed to
be a deep sleep, as Ricky White
blocked a shot, hit a free throw,
and scored on a layup to fatten
their lead, which had dwindled
to 15 on three baskets by Billy
McKinney.
Except for one point in the
second half when Orr called
a timeout and screamed "I
don't want anymore individualis-
tic play,"to his charges, M cni-
gan turned in a well-meshed
team effort that produced 21
assists: four each by Steve
Grote, Joe Johnson and Britt.
The Maize and Blue must now
prepare for the 0-6 Wisconsin
Badgers who invade Crisler
Monday night.
In the prelude to the varsity
game, Michigan's reserves, led
by the balanced scoring of Len
Lillard, Kent Storey and Dave
Ziegler, registered a 74-63 vic-
tory over Central Michigan, to
up their season record t) 6-1.
That contest was capped by an
exciting, 55 foot desperation shot
by the Little Chips, which fell
through at the buzzer.
Purple Hazed

By ROGER ROSSITER
When Angie Moretto scores, the Michigan
hockey team wins. When Moretto gets blank-
ed, the Wolverines fall flat.
MINNESOTA SHUT Moretto out last night,
and the Gophers' Pat Phippen collected five
points on a three goal hat trick and two
assists.
The result: A 5-2 Gopher victory.
"We were a lot more physical tonight,"
Minnesota coach Herb Brooks said. "Not a
chippy physical. We just were taking the
bodies out."
PHIPPEN GOT the Gophers off and run-
ning 25 seconds into the contest, slipping Tom
Younghans' centering pass between Michigan
goalie Robbie Moore's pads.
"Right away we made two mistakes in the
first 15 seconds," Dan Farrell, Michigan's
coach, said. "I thought that was a critical
goal. Maybe the kids didn't think so, but I
did."
Minnesota increased its lead to 2-0 on Phip-
pen's second goal, a power play effort, five
minutes into the second period.
TOM VANNELLI made it 3-0 when he skat-
ed around Wolverine defenseman Greg Fox
and tucked a backhander between Moore and
the post.
"Greg was trying to ease him off to the
post," Farrell said. "He was in a position
where he couldn't tell where he was relative to
the net.
"All he can hope is that the angle is cut
off," Farrell continued. "Unfortunately, it
wasn't."
wTIlE WOLVERINES looked well on their
way toward a 3-0 deficit after two periods
when two Gophers committed fouls on the
same play.
Greg Natale needed only 11 seconds to poke
a rebound past Minnesota goalie Larry Thay-
er. Fox skated in from the left point and let
loose a low drive that Thayer seemed to
have between his pads.

The puck fell loose, and Natale tucked it
home.
Tom Lindskog then planted a high drive
over Thaver's left shoulder with eight seconds
left in the second Gopher minor penalty.
THE WOLVERINES pressed for the equal-
izer throughout the third period but never
found the mark.
Kris Manery had Michigan's best chance
when Ben Kawa fed him the puck at the edge
of the crease.
Thayer slid across the net and caught
Manery's wrist shot with his left leg pad,
clearing the puck to the corner.
MOORE STOPPED two Gopher breakaways
with sliding saves to keep Michigan close, but
Minnesota finally got the clincher at 16:15.
Vannelli skated up the slot, and Moore
"thought he was going to pass to the left
winger." Vannelli shot, however, and Moore
was caught leaning in the wrong direction.
Phippen added the final goal into an empty
net, one second before the final buzzer.
THE VICTORY KEPT Minnesota one point
back of Western Collegiate Hockey Association
leader Michigan State, which split its series
ag-inst Minnesota-Duluth at East Lansing.
Michigan remains in sixth place with an
11-11 record and is still trying to break out of
its weekly win one, lose one pattern.
Hats off to thee...
FIRST PERIOD
SCORING: 1. Minn-Phippen (Younghans, Van-
nelli) 0:25.
SECOND PERIOD
SCORING: 2. Minn-Phippen (Polch) 4:47, pp.;
3. Minn-Vannelli (unassisted) 15:44; 4. M-Natale
(Moretto, Fox) 16:55, pp.; 5. M-T. Lindskog (Moret-
to, Hughes) 18:36, pp.
THIRD PERIOD
SCORING: 6. Minn- Younghans (Phippen, Van-
nelli) 16:15; 7. Minn-Phippen (Vannelli, Morrow)
19:59, empty net.
GOALIE SAVES

full court
PRESS
Two points for 'Kuz ...
.it's been a long time.
By JEFF SCHILLER
FOR MANY, MICHIGAN'S 79-58 win over Northwestern was
just another dull ballgame. But for Wolverine guard Tim
Kuzma, Saturday's contest was one he'll remember all his life.
Kuzma, you see, scored his first varsity points in almost three
years at Michigan yesterday afternoon.
Unless you are a rabid Michigan basketball fan, you probably
don't know much about Tim Kuzma. Occasionally a Crisler Arena
partisan will scan the line-up list, and yell for the coaches to
insert him when the contest's outcome is a foregone conclusion.
However, as Kuzma himself jokingly puts it, "I'm not exactly a
household word around here."
But what's so special about Tim Kuzma? There are lots of
high school stars who can't make the grade in Big Ten com-
petitioa.
Maybe Kuzma Is in that class, but there's no way to tell.
Kuzma is not the same basketball player who entered Michi-
gan in the fall of 1972. In fact, Tim Kuzma's ability to play
at Pll may be regarded' as a small miracle.
Tim Kuzma had open heart- surgery in the middle of his
freshman year. His condition, known to medical students as
anamalous pulmonary return (more easily described as a small
hole in the wall of his heart coupled with a misplaced vein)
was discovered soon after Kuzma began noticing a lack of
stamina during squadworkouts.
Kuzma describes the trauma.
"What they did, was cut out the misplaced vein and plug
it into the hole. My age and the, fact that I was in good condi-
tion made the operation less of a risk, but they had a priest
come in the night before the operation and administer my last
rites. That really scared me.
"I can't say exactly what the effects have been. For a
long time I couldn't run and to this day I'm not sure
whether I'm still recovering."
"But I'm glad I had that operation-they told me that in ten
or fifteen years, the danger would have been much greater."
It's clear that some effects still linger. As Michigan assistant
coach Bill Frieder explained, "Tim is a terrific shooter and
knows the game very well, but he lacks the stamina to compete
for a long period of time. It's too bad, because he had the talent
until the surgery changed things."
So Tim Kuzma rides the bench, practices every day, and
occasionally plays in an actual game. How does he feel knowing
that three years ago he was regarded as the outstanding high
school cager in Indiana, and now he is only an obscure substi-
tute?
"I'm just happy to be here at Michigan," Kuzma said. "I
came to college for an education as well as for basketball and
I've gotten a real good one. I've met a lot of great people here
too-everybody has been just wonderful.
"Today's game and the ones just like it make it all
worth it. Those two points have sure been a long time coming,
haven't they? But even if I had never scored, I would still
have a lot to be thankful for.
"I don't mean to sound overly philosophical," he concluded,
"but I've seen athletics from two perspectives now. It's like life,
some are at the top and others struggle up from the bottom."
From some, you might consider statements of this type as
a polite way to disguise their frustration. But not Tim Kuzma.
He has wn the respect of his coaches, fellow players, and
friends because he remains hard-working and personable under t
circumstances that would have overwhelmed many.
PIrhaps Kuzma's attitude is summed up best by his descrip-
tion of a situation that occurred about a year ago.
"As I was leaving the dressing room," he said, "a littles
kid ran un to me beging for my autnranh. Rut before heI

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
TYPICAL OF yesterday's officiating is this play. Rick White
was not called for goaltending despite the fact that he -has
grabbed the rim. Witnesses to the crime are Joe Johnson,
C. J. Kppec, and Northwestern's Chris Wall.

M-Moore
Minn-Thayer
At tendance-687 9

1
12
13

2 3 Total
7 11 30
9 9 31

Robinson
Britt
Kupec
Johnson
'Grote
White
Baxter
Thompson
Schinerer
Johnston
Comstock
Kuzm a
Team
Totals
N
Williams
Svete
Wallace
Mc Kinney
Teasley
Cartwright
Hale
Allen
Hildebrand
Wall
Dennis
Fields
Team
Totals

MICHIGAN
FG FT
2-4 2-2
7-12 2-2
9-19 8-8
4-11 2-4
1-7 4-4
2-4 1-2
4-4 0-0
0-1 0-0
0-0 0-0
0-0 0-0
0-0 0-0
0-1 2-4

R
9
6
10
4
2
6
1
0
1
0
1
6

F
2
4
4
2
4
0
2
1
1
1
0
4

TP
6
16
26;
10
6
5
8
0
0
0
0
2

"
i

DILL SKIPS INVITATIONAL:
G le 1 s take down Illini

Brink, rown star
in defeat of Ilini

O

29-63 21-26 47 21 79
RTHWESTERN
FG FT R F TP
4-11 2-2 8 2 10'
2-5 0-2 5 2 4
4-4 0-0 1 5 8
8-11 0-0 3 3 16
3-8 0-0 0 1 6
1-5 2-2 3 1 4
0-4 1-2 1 3 1
0-1 0-1 1 3 0
1-3 2-2 0 1 4
1-9 0-2 5 1 2
0-1 0-0 0 0 0
1-1 1-1 0 0 3
9a
25-63 8-14 36 22 58'
lE BY PERIODS
46 23 79
TERN 26 32 58
Roger Parramore,3Fred;
8 I

i
'
E

Distance, high jump
top events for Blue

By JON CHAVEZ

SCOR
MICHIGAN
NORI WES'
Officials:I
Jaspers
Crowd: 620

Big Ten
Standings
Conf All Games
W L W L Pct

special To The Daily
CHAMPAIGN-URBANA - The Wol-
verine matmen, wrestling their second
meet in the last 24 hours, prepared for
the uncoming home meet against top-
ranked Iowa by disposing of pesky
Illinois, 21-14, here, yesterday.
IT APPEARED as though Michigan
might have a rough time at first.
Wolverine Todd Schnieder bit the dust
at the feet of 118-pounder Gary Mat-
lock, 13-5, and Phil Miller scored a
quick takedown against Wolverine ace
Jim Brown in the 126-pound match.
But Brown, who in Johannesen's es-
timation "wrestled a gutty match,"
came back strong in the final three
minutes, won 10-6, and sent Michigan
on its way.
Surprising freshman Karl Briggs con-
tinued to wrestle well as he handled
Illini veteran Randy Chirico rather
handily, 10-6.
THE CLOCK was most ungenerous to
150-pounder John King and Wolverine
captain Dave Curby.
Against Randy Sulaver, who finished
fourth in the Big Ten last year, King
made a ferocious third period come-
back with a reversal and a takedown--
only to fall two points short of his
bewildered opponent as time expired.
"That's the best John has wrestled
in a long time," Johannesen said.
IF THE CLOCK went fast for King,

it was too slow for Curby.
Curby, still recovering from a shoul-
der injury, appeared to have a good
chance against 190-pounder Tom Ed-
grin, whom he defeated last year.
But in the third period, Edgrin,
making use of the defending Big Ten
champion's weak right side, registered
a pin with no time showing on the
clock.
An unperturbed Johannesen main-
tained that Edgrin, "is just not in
Curby's caliber. I think Curby can
beat him when he's healthy."
Edgrin's effort came too little too
late for the Illini. A superior decision
by Dan Brink over Mark Zinni and a
victory by Mark Johnson over Picky
Mitchum had already clinched the meet
for the Maize and Blue.
Illini amaized
118-Gary Matlock (I) dec. Todd Schneider
(M), 13-5
126-Jim nBrown (M) dec. Phil Miller (1),
10-6
134-Brad McCrory (M) dec Bruce Beam
(I), 5-1
142-Karl Briggs (M) dec. Randy Chirico
(1), 10-6
150-Randy Sulaver (1) dec. John King (M),
3-6
158-Ed Neiswender (M) dec. Doug Chirico
(I), 7-4
167-Dan Brink (M) sup. dec. Mark Zinni
(I), 18-4
177-Mark Johnson (M) dec. Ricky Mit-
chum (1), 8-2
190-Tom Edgren (I) pinned Dave Curby
(M), 8:00
Hwt-Mitch Marsicano (M) drew Kevin
Pancratz (1), 1-1

By ANDY GLAZER

"I don't know what happened. He just
didn't show up, just like when he's
supposed to be at a class."-Anony-
mous MSU Timekeeper.
"He" is Michigan State star track-
man Marshall Dill. The Olympic-class
sprinter, recently declared ineligible
for poor grades, failed to show up for
the Michigan Relays last night. Ile had
been entered as an independent.
DILL'S ABSENCE disappointed many
of the estimated crowd of 500 at the
new Multi-Sports Building. But their
disappointment didn't last for long, as
two other top-notch sprinters turned in
classy performances.
.Hasely Crawford and Stan Vinson,
both of Eastern Michigan, had brilliant
individual efforts. Crawford won the 60
yard dash easily in 6.0, and Vinson, who
set a world indoor record in the 440
last week, ran away with last night's
600 competition in 1:08.7.
Michigan's top performances came in
the three-mile run and the high jump.
In the three-mile, Mike McGuire and
Bill Donakowski, both freshmen, passed
a pair of fading EMU runners with a
half mile to go and took first and sec-
ond, respectively, in the event.
McGUIRE'S TIME of 13:42.6 broke
the old Michigan indoor record by 12
seconds.
Donakowski, who was only 3; sec-
onds behind McGuire, was happy with

his result, but a litt! surprised at the
EMU strategy. "They went out quickly,
which was just what we wanted," he
said.
Michigan's Doug Gibbs and Jeff
Swanson took the top two spots in the
high jump. Both cleared 6'10",
WOLVERINE TEAMS took second in
three relay races. In the shuttle-hurdles
and the two-mile relays the Michigan
foursomes trailed far behind the win-
ners, Michigan State and Loyola of Chi-
cago.
IN THE exciting 1000-yard run, Eric
Chapman of the Ann Arbor Track Club
won at 2:10.4. But for second place fin-
isher Mike Burns of Central Michigan
the response was deep disappointment
-his time was also 2:10.4.
Gymnasts top
tepid Gophers
MINNEAPOLIS-In their most im-
pressive showing of the year the Mich-
igan gymnastics team topped Minne-
sota, 209.4-205.15, yesterday. The score
represents Michigan's highest point
total of the year.
Taking the top places for Michigan
were Randy Sakamoto in the floor ex-
ercises; Pierre Leclerc in valuting; Bob
Creek on the high bar; Rupert Hanson
on the pummel horse; and Joe Neuens-
wander on the rings.

Indiana
Purdue
Minnesota
MICH.
Ohio St.
Iowa
Illinois
Mich. St.
N'wes'rn
Wiscon.

7
5
4
4
4
3
3
1
0

0
2
3
3
3
4
4
4
6
7

18
10
12
11
10
7
7
9
3
3

0
5
4
4
7
9
8
5
12
11

1.000
.667
.750
.733
.588
.438
.467
.643
.200
.214

Yesterday's Results
MICHIGAN 79, Northwestern 58
Indiana 104, Purdue 71
Iowa 53, Minnesota 44
Illinois 66, Ohio St. 62
Michigan St. 105, Wisconsin 87

Iowa rips Gophers;I
Indiana wins again;re o
Xaxer

s c

ORES II

WOMEN SPLIT
Swimmers dunk SIU

I

CollegeUBasketball
Dame 84, UCLA 78
St. 94, St. Francis, Pa. 74
87, Detroit 84
n St. 72, Oregon 71, OT

From Wire Service Reports
A pair of upsets and one sick-
ening rout marked Big Ten
basketball yesterday.
The Iowa Hawkeyes shut out
the Minnesota Gophers for six
and one half minutes in the first
half and went on to defeat their
visitors, 53-44. It was the fifth
straight victory for Iowa over
Bill Musselman's goons.

Hoosiers, 104-71.
Purdue was holding the score
close when center John Garrett
got into foul trouble. While Gar-
rett rode the pines, the Hoosiers
broke the game open.
"We just got killed, there's no
other way to put it," moaned
Purdue coach Fred Schaus.
In thed av's final Bip Ten

N. C. State 106, Wake Forest 80
Kentucky 87, Florida 65
Cincinnati 83, Bowling Green 79
Alabama 92, Georgia 68
S. Carolina 93, Marshall 75
Manhattan 81, Army 69
Grinnell 54, Beloit 50
W. Michigan 77, Kent State 80
Pennsylvania 66, Providence 65
Ohio U. 75, Cent. Mich. 68
George Washington 83, W. Va. 75
Missouri 87. Iowa St 85
Auburn 87, Louisiana St. 78
N. Carolina 69, Maryland 66
Arkansas 73, SMU 69
IKansas 71, Okla. St. 60

By JEFF LIEBSTER
Michigan's male swimmers,
stunned by a disqualification in
the opening event, recovered
smartly to splash past Southern
Illinois, 64-49.
Key victories by Joe Bauer
and Gordon Downie, and a
Maize and Blue sweep of the
diving events, secured the Wol-
verine triumph.
In the first event, the med-

Two Ann Arbor boys: Joe
Bauer from Huron High and
Brian Wylie from Pioneer,
finished first and second in
the 200 yd. freestyle.tBauer
beat Wylie by two tenths of a
second and finished only twoI
seconds ahead of the last
place finisher.
Tom Szuba turned in another
superb performance, easily win-
ning the 200-yard individual
medley.

and optional one-meter diving.
Meanwhile, in East Lansing,
the women's swim team got
mixed results. In a three-way
meet, the women tankers edged
Indiana, 68-63, but were inun-
dated by hosting MSU, 87-44.
Victories, and new team
records for the Wolverine
women, came from Kathy
Know in the 200-yard tree-
style, and Debbie Brevitz in
the 200-yard individual med-

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