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September 07, 1974 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-07

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('Saturday, September 7, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Saturday, September 7, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Five

The Hindenburg flies ag ain

__ -- -_

CIti'ct A W&&%Acp £eknice4

By BOB THOMAS
Associated Press Writer
LOS ANGELES (R) - The
Hindenburg starts flying again
at Universal Studio, which is
doing its best to profit from
disaster. The story of the ill-
fated dirigible follows Earth-
quake and Airport 1975 in Uni-
versal's program of large-
scale, all-star movies about peo-
ple in cataclysms.
The Hinderburg may be the
trickiest yet.
"After all, the Hindenburg
was 804 feet long," explains Ro-
bert Wise, who is producing and
irecting the film, "so there's
o way we could reproduce it.
till, the dirigible is our main
tar, and we have to depict it
s well as we can.
"The interior is not so diffi-
ult, and we're building sets of
he passenger area, the gondola
nd inside the superstructure.
e have a 25-foot miniature of
he Hindenburg and we'll film
t with matte shots painted
ackgrounds."
Today's generation knows
bout the dirigible era only
rom history books. But to their
Iders, the sight of the huge.
igar-shaped air ships was a
amiliar one in newspaper
hotos and movie news reels.
Germany was the only nation
o carry passengers on its
ighter than aircraft - Amer-
ca's were for Navy use. The
raf Zeppelin, built in 1928
ith room for 20 passengers,
ircled the earth in 1929 and
lew regular transatlantic runs.
The Hindenburg, constructed
n 1936 with 70-person capacity,
arried 1,042 passengers across
he Atlantic until it crashed in
lames during its May 6, 1937,
rrival at Lakehurst, N.J. The
ydrogen gas that lifted the
irigible exploded and 36 per-
ons died. The United States,
hich had a monopoly on non-
xplosive helium, had refused
he gas to Nazi Germany.
"There can never be any

WELCOME TO ANN ARBOR
FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill St.-668-9341
(if no answer, 769-3354,
971-4875, 665-2683)
Silent Meeting for Worship-
Sunday, 10-11 a.m.
First Day School, nursery/
high, 10-11 a.m.
Adult Forum, 11-12.
Potluck every first Sunday,
Business meeting every t'ird
Sunday after worship.
D a i 1 y Morning Meditation
(546 Walnut St.), 8:30-9 -.m.
Wednesday Sack Lunch (1073,
East Engineering), 12-1 p.m.
Worship-sharing Groups (in
homes), Tues. / Wed. / Thurs.!
eves.
Friday Evening Family Night
(1420 Hill St.), 7:30-11 p.m.-:
s t o r i e s, discussions, games,
crafts, singing and dancing for
all ages.
American F r i e n d s Service
Committee (AFSC), 1414 Iill
St., 761-8283.
Bail & Prison Reform, 761-
8283, 761-8331.
Friends International Co-op,
1416 Hill St., 761-7435.
Friends L a k e Community,
19,720 Waterloo Rd., Chelsea,
I475-8775.
Movement for a New Society
(MNS), 665-6083.
World Peace Tax Fund, Box
1447, Ann Arbor.

LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
801 S. Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.in
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Service at 9:15 a.m.I
* * *
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Howard F. Gebhart
10:00 a.m. - Worship Service'
and Church School.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCHj
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
3:00 p.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years; Wednesday, through 6
years.
Reading Room - 306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-9 Mon., 10-5 Tues.-Sat.
"The Truth That Heals" -
WPAG radio, 10 a.m. Sunday.
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
10:00 a.m. - Holy Eucharist
and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Holy Eucharist in
chapel.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
10:30 a.m.--Morning Worship.
~-- -
~ -~

CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division--665-0606
Holy Eucharist at noon
Canterbury House.

at

I

__
1

i

4th HIT WEEK!

231 S. STATE ST.
Dial 668-6416

AP Photo
A 25-FOOT MODEL OF THE HINDENBURG, that ill-fated blimp last seen exploding over Lakehurst, N.J. in 1937, gets an
inspection from producer-director Robert Wise and actor George C. Scott as they prepare for the filming of "The Hinden-
burg" at Universal Studios. The movie, latest of Universal's efforts to cash in on cataclysms, will be based on a book claim-
ing the historic air disaster was caused by an anti-Nazi saboteur.

proof of what caused the ex-
plosion," commented Wise.
"The official explanation was an
electrical disturbance, but many
dirigible experts question that.
"After all, the Graf Zeppelin,
had flown for years through
all kinds of weather without
any mishap."

The theory in the movie is'
that a bomb was placed on
board by an anti-Nazi crew
member. That was proposed in
the book by Michael Mooney,j
which is the basis for the film.
William Atherton, late of The
Great Gatsby and Day of the!
Locust, plays the bomber. RoyI

Thinnes is the Gestapo agent
trying to detect him. Also in
the cast is George C. Scott as
a German intelligence officer.
Anne Bancroft is a German
countess traveling on the Hin-
denburg.
"There are so many kids who
don't know what a dirigible is

obert Stolz,
musician, defl
By DAVID STOREY
VIENNA, (Reuter) - The grand old man of Viennese mu-
c, in an immaculate suit set off by a sparkling jeweled tiepin,
ts back on a sofa and reflects on his 94th birthday.
"Birthdays are miserable. They always mark a step nearer
e end," he says.
But Robert Stolz, pupil of Engelbert Humperdinck (the or-
inal), acquaintance of Johann Strauss (the younger), prolific
mposer and tireless conductor, defies the passing years.
He still gets up at six in the morning to compose at the
aby grand piano by the French windows in his home over-
ooking Vienna.
His garden is full of flowers and red blooms line the. bal-
ony under the sloping Alpine roof. Situated on Himmelstrasse
Heaven Street), in a secluded, exclusive district of the capital,
he house is a suitable haven for such an avid Viennophile with
so restless a history.
Robert Stolz is nearing a century of life that has seen him
hobnobbing with legendary names in music, fleeing the Nazi
threat to the United States, living it up in the gaudiest years of
Hollywood and conducting orchestras throughout the world.
But his essential inspiration has always remained Vienna
nd its surroundings. Though born in Graz, south of the capi-
al, on August 25, 1880, he considers himself a true Viennese.
Many of his songs and operettas refer directly to Vienna
nd nearly all, particularly those composed while he was
broad, express nostalgiafor the capital.
His work is almost all deeply sentimental and his simnl-,
optimistic themese of love and flowers and spring came to
represent a ray of hope to the Viennese people for whom the
first half of the 20th century brought disillusion and misery in
plenty.
The muse in Robert Stolz has been undaunted by the ex-
perience of two world wars that reduced his country's empire
to nought almost overnight and then devastated its heart.
He is now fragile, though rotund, with thinning hair. Spec-
tacles perch on a beak-like nose. He smiles readily and the

Vienna 's grand
i the years
years have not daunted his articulate speech.
He still completes a workload of concerts, recording and,
composing that would exhaust a man a quarter of his age, and
adds official opening ceremonies and regular Heuriger (wine-
drinking) evenings for good measure. How does he do it?
"The moment I pick up the baton I forget how old I am.
As soon as I hear the music I go into a trance and the years
slip away," he says.
"I think that is the main reason for the success of my re-
cords - one thinks one is listening to a 20-year-old conductor."
Last year he conducted 11 recordings and has made more
than 350 records since 1962, when he was a mere 82. During his
life he has written more than 50 operattas, 100 film scores and
2,000 occasional pieces, including the United Nations march and
a philatelist's march. He is a keen stamp collector.
THe provides a present-day link with the golden age of
Viennese music at the turn of the century, when Strauss
brought magic to the outdoor waltzers in the city's stately
Stadt Park, and 'Franz Lehar's operettas were the staple.

i

that I felt we needed an ex-
planation at the start," said
Wise.
"Se we'll begin in black and
white and small screen with ac-
tual newsreels of how people
traveled on the dirigibles. Then
we'll open up in color and wide
screen with the Hindenburg's
maiden voyage of its second
year.
"We won't try to reproduce
the explosion; the newsreel
footage is too well-known and
too dramatic. Instead, t h e
screen will slowly dissolve into
black and white, and then I'll
intercut the actual explosion
with our own shots."
Wise will also use part of the
unforgettable radio narration by
Herb Morrison, who happened
to be at Lakehurst when trag-
edy happened.
Universal had been unable to
locate Morrison at his W e s t
Virginia home. It turned out he
was vacationing in California,
and he called the studio to in-
quire about the film.
$2.50 I

BIVOUNO
* JEANS
* WESTERN
SHIRTS
" BOOTS
* BOOK BAGS
* CAMPING GEAR
BII'OUNC
330 S. State St.
761-6207

IJPT.WN
SATURDAY
NIGHT

you mess
with their
money!

Sot., Sun, & Wed. open12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
Mon.-Tue.-Thur.-Fri. at
7 & 9 Only

SIDNEY POIER -BILL COSB
nHARRY BELAFONTE MGeeche Dn

They
funny

--Next--
Marx. Bros.
"ANIMAL
CRACKERS"
~,,,1

tU
r~ A PiAc Sermsoe, d
a ThisNewspadow £
Y The pAe ian Coud
C
Can anyone
do what
you do
any better?.
You're pretty darn good at
your job. But today, we all have
to consider how we can do
our work a little better. That's
how each of us.can help
keep our jobs here in America.
For now and for the future.
America. It only works
as well as we do.
The National COmUto- . on AIe 1.t1c WhMftWsiiO..

get
when

1974's MOST HILARIOUS
WILDEST MOVIE IS HERE
"May be the funniest movie of the
year. Rush to see it!" -M eapols rr tbne
"A smashing, triumphant satire:'
-Seatle Post Intelhgencer
"Riotously,.excruciatingly funny'
S-~Milwaukee Sentinel
"Consistently hilarious and
brilliant:', e cord
"Insanely funny, outrageous and
irreverent'..Bruce W -

KATHERINE HEPBURN FESTIVAL 1951
THE AFRICAN QUEEN
HUMPHREY BOGART won his only Oscar for his role as a cynical, hard-drinking riverboat
captain who is fleeing the Kaiser's Germans but is caught in the same boat as a prim mis-
sionary (Hepburn). The two of them are alone together for almost the entire film, allowing
James Agee's brilliant dialogue and John Huston's direction to build up the character con-
flict. An adventure story set in Africa and shot in fantastic color.
-KATHERINE HEPBURN FESTIVAL-
SUN.: QUALITY STREET
STONIGHT AT ARCHITECTURE
cinema guild 7:00& 9:00 Adm.$1 ?U

m.

_.__...__ _ _._.__ _ ®_..._. ._. ....._. t

MEDIACTRICS

Nat. Sc i.

Auditorium

SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE
Friday and Saturday
7:30 & 9:30
Admission: $1.00
At HILLEL
Sunday, Sept. 8
Roll out of BED for
BAGELS for BRUNCH-11 :00 A.M.
Sunday, Sept. 8
FOLK DANCING-12:30
Social Hall
The Dorms are closed so

A GREAT NEW
MOTION PICTURE COMEDY

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