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December 12, 1974 - Image 11

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-12-12

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,day, December 12, "1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Eleven

day, December 12, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

By JOHN KAHLER
Special To The Daily
CARBONDALE, Ill. - T h e
ichigan Wolverines ran into a
pell of Meriweather and some
erocious defense last night,
sing to the Southern Illinois
alukis, 87-67.
The Wolverines kept it close
two - thirds of the game,
t a sticky man-to-man de-
nse held them scoreless for1
er six minutes and allowed
e Salukis to break the game
en.
Southern Illinois jumped
out to a quick 8-0 lead, and
oe C. Meriweather took over
he defensive boards. For the
me, the 6-11 pivotman.
ored 32 points and ensnar-
d 19 rebounds. With the1
owd of 8,973 screaming at
e top of their lungs, the
ong evening started for the
olverines.
ut following a time out, the
Iverines pulled themselves
ether. The Salukis helped
atters by attempting to force
ball into Meriweather, a
ategem that resulted in sev-
1 momentum killing turnov-
What caused the SIU lead to
into a deficit, however, was
Salukis' inability to get

buri(
SoresY
NIGHT EDITORS:
BILL STIEG
RICH LERNER
back on defense. Fast - break
buckets by Steve Grote, Rick+
White and Joe Johnson gaveI
Michigan a 14-12 lead.
Then it was Michigan's turn
to lose its poise. Corky Abrams
tied the score at 18-18 after the
Salukis got five offensive re-
bounds on one possession.
SIU converted three straight
Michigan turnovers into buc-
kets, and the Salukis led by
six. Again Michigan rallied, and
a goaltending call on Meriwea-
ther gave Wayman Britt two
points and Michigan, a 33-32
lead.
Michigan could not hold the
lead, as SIU guard Perry
Hines ripped in two buckets
before Southern Illinois let
up on the defense. Britt set
up Grote on a slick behind-
the - back pass on a three-on-
one break to give Michigan
the lead 38-36 with 10 sec-

's

Michigan,

87-67

onds to go in the half., sistent Saluki man-to-man de- Boynton had hit baskets to put
But Mike Glenn hit Abrams fense. SIU up 56-52.
on a long pass, and Abrams The Wolverines needed over This time the Salukis were
slipped away from Kupec for a six minutes before scoring uncatchable, as Abrams and
turnaround jumper that sent their 51st and 52nd points on Meriweather connected. Michi-
the two teams in the locker two free throws by John Robin- gan attempted to rally behind
room in a deadlock. son. By then Glenn and Ricky a Grote free throw, Kupec buc-
Meriweather scored 16 points, ket and Johnson free throw, but
grabbed 11 rebounds in the Glenn's three point play drovei
first half and intimidated Michi- Stormiweather the finalnail into the coffin,
gan underneath. MICHIGAN pushing the score to 67-56. s
Meriweather hit a short jump- Orr pulled White and inserted
er to start the second half, Britt 6G FTDave Baxter, hoping that the
Glenn turned a steal into a buc- white 2-3 0-1 2 2 4 faster lineup would be better
ket and Joe C. hit again, all of Kupec 7-13 1-3 5 4 15 for the press. The newly short-
which added up to a six point Grote 613 4-6 8 5 16 ened Wolverines were destroyed
lead.; Johnson 4-14 6-S 1 4 14 by Meriweather.
d Baxter 1-3 0-0 2 2 2
A technical foul shot by Thompson 0-2 0-0 0 1 0 Orr put Joel Thompson in the
Johnson tied the score at 44-all. Robinson o-o 2-0 2 2 lineup hoping Joel wold hit a
With the Saluki bench and Totals 26-63 15-26 30 24 67 few long jumpers. Thompson
fans still steaming about the never got off a shot in the final
technical Britt appeared to SOUTHERN ILLINOIS minutes.

Meriweather is a fine player.
.When they get the ball to him,
he is super. Southern Illinois is
a fine team, and will be tough
for anybody to beat."
Indiana tops
Notre Dame
SOUTH BEND (P)-A 10-point
burst in the first half and the
shooting of forward Scott May
and center Kent Benson pro-
pelled third-ranked Indiana to
a 94-84 college basketball vi,-
tory over No. 11 Notre Dame
last night.
The 6-foot-1 May scored 22
points, and Benson, a 6-11 sopho-
more, tossed i2 19 to offset
Irish forward Adrian Dantley's
game high of 32 points.

An Explosive
Value
$10 for two semesters
(campus area)
Hurry, so you
won't miss a
Csinl su

. 1!

in

I LI L

charge
amazeme
was call
After t
ice cube
went to t
shots. Fo
opportun
Michigan
Thel
and fort
50, for}
Meriwea
with a
still cou

, 7 - -'/ ~s '
into Abrams. To the
,et of the fans, the foul
led, on Abrams.
the officials wiped the
s off the floor, Britt
he line and missed both,
ollowing several missed
ities, Rick White put
nahead.
lead see-sawed back
,th until it stuck at 50-

Abrams
Turner
Meriweather
Ricci
Glenn
Hines
M"Kelvey
Boynton
Nixon
Montford
Harris
Huggins
Team
Totals

4-6
0-4
12-19
5-10
6-10
4-7
0-1
3-4
1-4
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
35-65

0-0
0-1
8-10
0-0
5-5
4-4
0-0
0.1
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
0-0
17-21

9
3
19
.5
3
3
0
2
2
0
0
0
2
48

1
4
3
0
5
1
4
2
0
0
0
0
21

8
0
32
10
17
12
0,
6'
2'
o
0
0
0
87

Nothing Orr did could work
in the lhst minutes of the
game. The Wolverines col-
lapsed into a state of disor-
ganization. Southern Illinois
scored at will, and the only
thing that held the final mar-
gin of victory to twenty was
the clock running out.

4

"We looked
fully tired in1
I don't know
"We played w

like we got aw-
the second half.
why. Orr said,
cell in the first

SUBSCRIP TION
Call
164-0558
AAWI

about three minutes. s
ther broke the spell MICHIG,
tip-in, but Michigan Southern
uldn't budge the per-

CORE BY PERIODS

nIllinois

38 29 67
38 49 87

half and I thought we had a
chance to beat them.

!

BY GEORGE!
-George Hastings -

PLAYGROUND PRACTICE:

djustment problems

0 0

.or Campy the pro'
AST WEEKEND seemingly was not a very unusual one for
Detroit area basketball. The Pistons annihilated the Cleve-
nd Cavaliers at Cobo Arena. The Michigan Wolverines beat a
ough non-league foe at Crisler. And Campy Russell scored 14
oints - as the home fans roared their approval.'
But the unusual thing was that Campy scored his 14 points
or are Cavaliers, not the Wolverines.
Friday night marked the first trip for Russell back to the
Motor City since his jump as a hardship case to the profes-
sional ranks this season, and 5,000 basketball freaks turned
out to see what the hometown boy was up to.
A triumphant return, however, it was not. Because right
ow, as incredible as it may seem to those who watched him
lay for Michigan last year, Russell is not playing for the Cava-
'ers~
Of course, he gets in most of their games, as he did in
he final quarter Friday when his team trailed by twenty points.
Jut in terms of playing a significant amount of time, or of
laying in important situations, Campy has not been there.
He averages only about six minutes a game, and scores a
ere four points per contest when he does get in. In fact, ten
ferent Cavaliers rank ahead of Russell on the current Cleve-
nd pecking order. Only the forgotten Buckeye Luke Witte
pends more time riding the pines.
Friday's game was a good example of where Russell
stands with his new club. At forward, Cleveland coach Bill
Fitch started Dwight Davis and Bingo Smith, whose names
are not exactly household words. First substitute at the po-
sition was Fred Foster, whom the Pistons cut last year to
make room for Ben Kelso.

Whites
By J. M. MAYAS
An interesting comeback has
been in the making recently by
young white athletes in general,
particularly in the sport of bas-
ketball. During the mid-'50s, the
relatively few blacksuperstars
in the game sent white high
school scouts scouring through
t urban areas in a furious effort
to tempt young black kids into
their ranks.
The playing style and sup-
posed "natural" agility and
leaning ability of the black
ballplayer made him a sought-
after commodity in schools de-
sirous of either developing a
basketball program or reju-
venating a waningone.
Yet, not all of these initial
high school recruits were suc-
cessful on the college courts.
Many of these athletes were
criticized as not having the
"discipline" to play college ball.
Their apparent problem was a
lack of a team concept, the
source of which was open to a
variety of social-anthropological
explanations. The more obvious
problem of coaching inflexibility
was little cited.
The fact of the matter is that
black ballplayers had developed
their playing skills and styles
from years of work and effort.
Their performance on the court
was, and is, no more innate
than Marcel Marceau's miming
expertise. Execution comes from
constant work and discipline.

better high schools and colleges.I
There was a rather clear ex-
change taking place on thej
integrated teams of the '60s. The
prowess of the black ballplayer
was being supplemented by
good coaching.
The white ballplayer, on the
other hand, having been ex-
posed to competent coaching
all along, was attempting to
emulate the successful offen-
sive skills of their darker
teammates.
It was no surprise that the
former exchange was more
rapid in completion than the
latter. The black ballplayer ex-
posed to competent coaching
quickly developed a "game
sense" to surnlement his skills.
It took a lorger time, however,
for the white ballplayer to de-
velop the performance skills
necessary for a constantly im-
proving offensive game.
What basketball enthusiasts
witnessed during the '60s was
the dynamics of this first ex-
change. The '70s are demon-!
strating the completion of the
second. Over the past few years,
an increased number of white
ballplayers have started working
on basketball skills early.
Often, they have overcome
fears and migrated to play-
grounds frequented mostly by
blacks. This early exposure to
experienced practitioners fa-
cilitated the white player's de-
velopment of a "playing sense."
The time has arrived when
the inner-city manhunt for
black talent is beginning to
subside. The white ballplayer
in high schools nowadays looks
GOOD LUCK
ON EXAMS
UM STYLISTS
at the UNION
Dave, Chet, Harold

learning fast

as if he were tutored by Nate
Archibald. In many cases, heI
appears to have learned well
from his early "street ball"
experiences. It should be no
surprise, then, that more and
more press is being given to
white high school and college
superstars.
The near saturation of basket-
ball by black players occurred
primarily because they brought
with them a well refined and
developed style of play. As that
form of execution has been pick-
ed up by other players, basket-N
ball has almost become an open
field. The white ballplayer has
come into his own (?), and
appears to be making a strong
bid at reclaiming his place in
the basketball sun. It's your
guess askto how successful it
will be.
J. M. Mayas is a black gradu-
ate student in psychology at
the University. He is a native of
New York and played forward
for Hofstra's basketball team
in 1969.
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Even though the Cavs were falling completely apart, there
as no sign of Campy until the middle of the final period, when
t was far out of reach.
When he did come in, Russell showed flashes of his under-
raduate style. He hit a pair of long floaters, snuck in for a
,ouple of easy ones off the offensive boards, converted a steal
nto a lay-up, and topped it off with a crowd-pleasing, twisting,
atented Campy drive. There certainly was nothing physically
rong with Russell.
So, why is this obviously talented player spending his rookie
ear on the bench? And, after being the star of a nationally
anked college squad, how is he taking it?
Russell, in the locker room after the gfime, claimed to be {
not at all onset with the way things are going. "I'm not dis-
appointed," he said. "I have nothing to complain about. I'm
just gonna have to leirn the coach's system."
Figuring out the "system" Fitch uses indeed, seems to be
he problem for Russell. "I haven't yet learned exactly what ,
he coach wants me to do," the former Wolverine explained.
'Once I do, I think I'll be playing. He wants me to work with
zny shot selection. So far, I'm just not fitting into the flow of
he way the way I should."
Fitch, too, pointed out the disadvantage a rookie has in
laying for a new coach in a new league. "He's got a lot to
earn," said the Cleveland coach of Russell.
"Campy's improved since the start of training camp, but
here's still quite a ways to go," Fitch warned. "He's farther
long offensively than defensively, but he's not yet fit in with
his team."
Still, it's h-rd for a veteran Comny-watcher to believe
that Russell does not have more innate ability than the peo-
ple playing ahead of him. Russell has always been a free- I
form player, but certainly last season he proved that he could
play solid defense and also operate effectively in a disciplin-
ed style of team basketball.
Fitch admits that his plans in the distant future definitely
elude Russell. But, he pointed out, the Cavaliers were 13-8
oing into the Detroit game, so why change when a team is play-
g the best ball in its history?
"All four of my forwards are playing well," Fitch claims,
,so I'm sticking with them. If Campy continues to come around,
nd take advantage of the little plums you throw him now and
hen, he'll take the next step and move up to the point of play-
g 18-19 minutes a night."
A pro starting job is still not yet in sight for Campy Russell.
t's too bad, because John Orr probably would have had one
or him at Michigan.
BARBER. BILLIARDSI

What the early black high school
ballplayer lacked, like any play-
er without a lot of organized
playing experience, was a full:
sense of game strategy.
By this, I mean to suggest
that there was littletopportun-
ity prior to the rage of the late
'50s for the young black ball-
player to receive competent
coaching and instruction in the
SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Purdue 94, w. virginia 83
Butler 79, Illinois St. 78
NBA
New Orleans 106, Golden St. 103
Detroit 103, Washington 89

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