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December 12, 1974 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-12-12

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Thursday, December 12, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
:f.::.~'--...::::r:::::.:.::. . CITES NATIONAL INTEREST:
.......Juntas' expropriaes IT

Page Three

stock

SANTIAGO, Chile (A) - Cit-
ing national interest, the mili-
tary junta expropriated ITT's
controlling stock in Chile's tele-
phone company yesterday, add-
ing another chapter to the U.S.-
based conglomerate's tangled
involvement here.
The International Telephone
and Telegraph Corp. valued tne
holdings at $153 million three
years ago. An ITT spokesman
in New York said the expropria-
tion yesterday was a "legal,
technical step" to reacik agree-
ment on compensation and tIat
it stemmed from a decision
"favorable to the comoany
which upheld ITT's $95 million
insurance claim."
IN A decree, the junta author-
ized the economy minister to
negotiate compensation for the
expropriated ITT stock in the
Compania de Telefonos, a mono-
poly controlling Chile's 400,01)0
telephones.
Sources here said the 3ecree
legally defined the status of
ITT's 71 per cent majority share

in the company because "some-
thing must be expropriatai be.
fore there can be any co-open
sation."
ITT was accused of trying to
block the 1970 election of the
late President Salvador Allende,
the only freely elected Marxist
chief of state in the Western
Hemisphere, including offering
the CIA $1 million in funds ITT
denied it.
ALLENDE, who was toppled
by the military in a bloody coup
on Sept. 11, 1973 and died the
same day, had pledged to build
a Socialist state in Chile through
democratic means.I
But he dredged up long-forg)t-
ten laws to take over vast areas
of private enterprise without re-
sorting to actual expropriation
and nationalization, with the ex-
ception of nationalizing h u g e
U.S.-operated copper mines for
which he paid no compensation.
Rather he "intervened" in pri-
vate firms after alleged com-
plaints of workers about labor
conditions or other disputes. Us-

ually, left-wing unions started the legal status of the stozks had
the trouble. to be made more clear.
IN SEPTEMBER 1171, he " In the decree, the government
tervened in the teleuhone --con- said it considers 'dig the;
pany charging it was providing phone company to be in the na-?
"bad service." This meant that I tional interest, so it exnropriat-
state-appointed administrators ed the stocks. When varioll ac-
were sent in to dire-t the day tivities, such as copper rninw.g
to-day operations of the firm are said to be in the interest of
until the alleged proolem was the state, the government does
resolved. not turn them back to their own-
But Allende kept these"ninter- ers.
ventors" on the job )n a per-
manent basis and that was th. ; ITT WAS a prime target of.
situation that the military frnd the Allende regime 'ith con-
when they took power stant attacks against the con-
The junta set abomit to retarn glomerate appearing in the lo-
hundreds of private industries cal press.
to their owners and dismantled However, even during the
Allende's mammoth agrarian re- height of the propaganda cam-
form program, which had con- paign, the corporation's invest-
solidated farms into state hold- ments in two ITT-Sheraton ho-
ings. tels and a cable office were
IT PAID compensation to 'he not touched.
three nationalized U.S. copper The accusations against ITT
companies - Anacond ), Keane- were based on confidenfial in-
cott and Cerro - andl has been teroffice memos first leaked to;
in informal negotiati )Z with columnist Jack Anderson.
ITT over its holdings in the
phone company. IT WAS suspected at the time
But since the compan jwa s that Chilean officials had passed
never actually naronaliz-e'1 or the papers to Anderson after
expropriated, sources here :rd finding them in the phone com-

PEACE ON EARTH
Comes from Peace Inside
Meditation Brings Peace
A free public program on
meditation will be held with
Mahatma Prakesh Bai i at
the Friends Meeting House
1420 Hill St., Ann Arbor.
Sun., Dec. 15-8 p.m.
She will speak on the med-
itation revealed by Shri
Guru Maharaj Ji.

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
:{.i;}i:i: ' :v }{j:S ?: Er,.?:4? : E Ei! ':;::f:?s'::vEt : ":v,.ยข: . vr{s{ . i4:Yiii;:;":5:"":% U r.i":i":":::: :< *:i*."

AP Photo
POLICE ARREST a youth after an incident outside of South Boston High School yesterday.
White students, who left the school after a black stabbed a white, waited outside for school
buses to come for the black students.
South Boston erupts in
violence; youth stabbed

Day Calendar
Thursday, December 12
Study Day.
WUOM: Keith Hopkins, Brunel U.,
"From High to Low Roman Em-
pire: The Consequences of Infla-
tion," 10:05 am.
Black Faculty-Staff Assoc. Meet-
ing: Regents' Admin. Bldg., noon.
Physics: David Politzer, Harvard,
"Test of Asymptotic Freedom,"
2038 Randall Lab., 4 pm.
MARC: Sine Nomine Players,
"Music from the Time of Richard.
II," Main Lounge, Lawyers Club,
4:30 pm.
Int'l Night: Scandinavian food,
League Cafeteria, 5-7:15 pm.
UM-Dearborn: Geo. Carlin, Ford
Community College Athletic Me-
morial Ctr., 8 pm.
Women's Studies Films: Women's
Liberation, Aud C, Angell, 8pm.
Dance: "Solstice: A Celebration
of Dance, Concert II," Schorling
Aud., SEB, 8 pm.
Macromolecular Research Ctr.: M.
Weinshenker, "Polymeric Reagents,"
1300 Chemistry, 8 pm.
Career Planning and Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7460
Job Interviews for Seniors: Spe-
cific information about conferences
in Chicago, Grand Rapids, Canton,
Toledo, Ohio, and Philadelphia, PA.
now available at CP&P. Check
also for late announcements of oth-
er scheduled conferences.
Full tuition for graduate study in
Marketing at the U. of Cincinnati
plus training on the job Is offered
by Burke Marketing Research.
Write: Sanford Cooper, Pres., 1529
Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH.
45206.
-

One - year Master's degree in
Journalism, Columbia U. for hu-
manities & sciences majors. Write
Asst. Dean, Graduate School of'
Journalism, Columbia U., NYC,1
10027.
Master of Public Admin. Penn]
St. U. new program. Prerequisites:
acctg., econ, statistics, GRE (apti-
tude test only) must be taken inE
Dec. or Jan. for June admission.}
This 11 mo. program is preparatory
for .City Mngt., Urban Planning,,
Pub. Policy Analysis, Health Care]
Planning, & general gov't. admin.I
positions.
Grad Program in Urban Studies,
some financial aid available, Wash-1
ington U., St. Louis - to prepare
for urban planning & admin., social
policy development, and ethnic poli-
cies Contact: Glen Hold, 252 Mc-
Millan Hall, Washington U.
Special Program in Alcohol and
Drug Addiction Community Educa-
tion at Western Mich. U. Contact
Dr. Thos. Williams, 857 Buckhout;
St., WMU, Kalamazoo 49008.
International Relations Graduate
Fellowships, U. of Denver. Joint
programs available in Law, ,Admin.,
Econ., & Soci. Deadline: Feb. 15.
Write: Dean, Graduate School, U.t
of Denver, Denver, 80210.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 81
Thursday, December 12, 1914
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106
Published d a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street. Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area ); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
Women's Community Center
announces a
FEMINIST
HOLiDAY BAZAAR
SAT., DEC. 14
9 a m.-5 p.m.
GUILD HOUSE-802 Monroe
FREE DAY CARE

pay ffces herew n!teA-
lende regime intervened.
There has been a grownl g
trend in recant years in Latin
America to take over ior gn
holdings in orders to ext.i'd
more national control over the
economies of the Latin :cou-
tries.
The Venezuelan government if
President Carlos Andres Perez
has announced it will take oxr
the U.S.-dominated iron )ro in-
dustry in the country Jan. 1.I

For hifi bargain hunters,
this is the holiday stereo
sale worthy of note.
te chihi1
QaiyComponents at the RighptPie
122 East Washington St.
Ann Arbor

t

BOSTON (A) - Decoy buses
and lines of charging policemen
were used yesterday to spirit
black students out of South
Boston High School as about
1,000 angry whites hurled mis-
siles.
Several police officers were
injured by bricks, stones, cans
and other flying objects as they
led the police charge in front
of the school, which was closed
earlier in the day after a 17-
year-old pupil was knifed.
A NUMBER of civilians in the
area also were injured, wit-
nesses said.
An undisclosed number of
white youths and adults were
arrested, police said.
After police cleared whites
from in front of the school, four
school buses rolled up to the
front door. But the 132 black
pupils who had been inside were
led out a side door to other
buses.
THE MOVING of the black
students climaxed a day of ten-
sion that started when a white
student was stabbed at the
school. A black youth was ar-
rested in connection with the
incident, police said.
The School Department order-
ed all South Boston schools in-
volved in court-ordered busing
for desegregation closed for the
rest of the week, hoping for a
cooling-off period to relieve ten-
sions.

Whites outside of South Bos- Boston was reported in
ton High smashed windows in condition at Boston City
the decoy buses and vandalized pital after surgery for a
several police cars. wound in the abdomen.
AN ESTIMATED 300 state Charged with assault an
and city police were in and tery with a dangerous w
around the school as the jeering was James White, 18, o
crowd refused to leave the area. Roxbury section. School
City Councilwoman Louise ials said they had no reco
Day Hicks, a staunch busing White as a student at
opponent, pleaded with the Boston High.
crowd to let the buses take The Irish, working -
black students back to Rox- South Boston section has
bury, the mostly black part of the center of tension since
the city where they live. ing began in September.
Her pleas were met with violence that included bus
shouts of, "Bus them back to ings and gang beatings i
Africa" and a barrage of ob- first weeks of busing, ge
scenities. order was restored.
'ELSEWHERE IN Boston, at But antibusing sentimei
Roslindale High School, nearly mained strong with opp
all of the white student body staging weekly rallies.
walked out of class. The move have been continued sp
by the 600 students came after incidents of violence in
a reported slapping incident be- al schools.
tween a black and a white stu-
dent Tuesday.
Extra police were called to
Hyde Park High, previously the
scene of racial outbreaks, when
officials noted what they called
a tense atmosphere and threats
of white student walkouts.
The city's other 200 schools J R
were relatively calm. School of-
ficials reported over-all attend- LO
ance at 75.6 per cent, slightly
below average.
;IN THE South Boston stab-
bing, Michael Faith, 17, of South .H ,

good
Hos-
stab
d bat-
eapon
f the
offic-
ord of
South
class
been
e bus-
After
.ston-
n the
eneral
nt re-
onents
There
oradic
sever-

- -- - ------

Poetry Reading
WITH
Robert Hayden
and Ke rry Thomas

SHORT or LONG I READING FROM
HAIRSTYLES TO PLEASET
DASCLA I Thursday, Dec.
DASCOLA
BARBERS a t GU IL D H OUS

THEIR WORKS
12-7:30 p.m.
SE, 802 Monroe

ARBORLAND-971-9975
MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733
E. LIBERTY-668-9329
E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354

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list price Our Price
including: castenada-tales of power 7.95 6.75
angela davis-an autobiography 8.95 7.60
fletcher-new complete walker 8.95 7.60
joseph heller-something
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diary of anais nin vol. 5 7.95 6.15
solzhenitsyn-gulag archipelago 12.50 10.62 It;
.,l-s... l-....r r t 4 ~I nfti ., #44 i

A phone call. A simple,
ten-cent phone call for a cab could
save your friend's life.
If your friend has been
drinking too much, he shouldn't
be driving.

that the drunk drivers responsible
for killing young people are most
often other young people.
Take a minute. Spend a
dime. Call a cab. That's all. If you
can't do that, drive him yourself.

[- -- - -- - " -" -" -"" -~ -" -" ""
DRUNK DRIVER, DEPT. Y*
I BOX 2345
I ROCKVILLE, MARYLAND 20852
I want to save a friend's life.
Tell me what else I can do.

I

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