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September 05, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Paas Six

ITHE MICIG~AIN DAILY

1 flursciy, z piTreiute.a, rat ,

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-woomm

t

2

conservatives,

1

511 2 Hvy .
T E ONE ABA
MicNI GaN
TNEa-rgf- ca PoNS
c

iberal
race

win

in

school

board

It's no joke, really. The University

Theatre

Programs

is offering

a

book of ten tickets for just ten dol-
lars. The book entitles you to see
whatever show you wish, and sit in
whatever seat you can get at the
time you exchange each coupon for
a ticket. The coupons can be used
all at once, e.g. ten people can use
one book for one show; or the cou-
pons can be used individually.

..--
S rurrra t 94

By JEFF SORENSEN
and REBECCA WARNER
Two conservatives and a lib-
eral won election to the city's
Board of Education June 10, as
voters rejected a proposed 1.3
mill property tax increase to
cover school operating costs
over the next five years.
The winners were Republican-
backed candidates Wendy Bar-
hydt and Peted Wright and lib-
eral-endorsed Tanya Israel.
Their victories bring member-
ship on the school board to a
6-3 conservative to liberal bal-
ance, since they replace three
conservatives who did not seek
re-election. ,
BARHYDT (the top runner
with 6,913 votes), interpreted
her victory as a sign voters
agree that 'we've got to teach
the basic skills" and that "dis-1
cipline is important."
Wright stressed the issue of
CURIOUS USED BOOK
SHOP, TOO
340 S. State/Upstairs
761-0112
COMICS (New & Used),
SCIENCE FICTION, MAGA-
ZINES & POSTERS, & USED
BOOKS of all types.

schools."
Israel, who was endorsed by a
coalition of Democrats known
as the "liberal caucus" gar-
nered 6,027 votes. She expressed
"extreme disappointment" at
the defeat of the school millage
proposal, but predicted, "This'
will be a more open, more co-.
operative kind of board, at
least this is my hope."
DURING THE school b oa r d
campaign, conservative candi-
dates called for increased cen-
tralization of curriculum control,
while liberals and radicals term-
ed coordination a route to un-
necessary rigidity.
The liberal-endorsed and Hu-
man Rights Party (HRP) candi-
dates strongly criticized Plan
F, a proposal which would re-
locate about 800 elementary and
secondary school students by
busing North Campus children
to relieve overcrowding at Hur",
on High School.
In vote totals compiled at
Pioneer High School on election
night, the candidates lined up as
follows: Barhydt, 6,913; Wright,
6,673; Israel, 6,027; Stanley
Bielby 5,361; Will Simpson, 5,-

curriculum standardization in 011; E. Stevens Binder, 2,963; Yaco and that the Party's large
accounting for his 6,673-vote fin- George Kolasa, 2,691; Astrid slate of hopefuls that year drew
ish. He said the election demon- Beck, 2,446; Wiliam Cash, 1,787; attention to Yaco's candidacy.
strates that voters support "put- ( Manfred Schmidt, 1304 and Lar-
ting some structure back in our ry Mann, 304. THIS YEAR observers pre-

EACH BOOK CAN BE USED FOR THE FOLLOWING POWER CENTER SHOWS:

OCT. 9-12-Edmond Rostand's
DEC. 4-7-Wiliam Shakespeare's
FEB. 5-8
APRIL 16-1 9-Aristorhanes'

'CYRANO DE BERGERAC'
'PERICLES'
A new play featuring guest actors
'THE BIRDS'

LIBERAL ELLIOT Chikofsky,
who withdrew his candidacy too
late to remove his name from;
the ballot, received 337 votes.
The millage was proposed to
cover "operating expenses" of
the city's schools over the next
five years - including inflation
costs, maintenance, and crea-
tion of curriculum co-ordinator
and attendance counselor posts.
The majority of the candidates
supported passage of the mill in-
crease, which was defeated by
more than 1,800 votes.
THE ELECTION drew some
16,000 votes, 1,000 more than
turned out last year. Typically,
voting was sparse in the stu-
dent-dominated First and Se-
cond Wards.
HRP candidates Astrid Beck,
who received 2,446 votes, com-
mented, "It becomes evident
to me that the liberals in this
town aren't going to win elec-
tions until they align themselves
with the student voters."
Beck and HRP hopeful Larry
Mann ran on a radical platform
of community and student con-
trol of the schools. Beck said
the returns were "very incon-
sistent" because voters defeated
the millage increase but elect-
ed candidates who supported the
tax hike, which HRP opposed.
MANN, 14, ran a write-in
campaign after school officials
refused to accept hisnominat-
ing petitions, citing state laws
prohibiting peple under 18 from
holding elected office.
He received 304 votes, a low
total compared to approximately
1,500 garnered by 15-year-old
HRP candidate Sonia Yaco in
1972.
Mann pointed out that HRP
ran a "stronger campaign" for
CURIOUS USED BOOK
SHOP, TOO
340S . State/Upstairs
761-0112
COMICS (New & Used),
SCIENCE FICTION, MAGA-
ZINES & POSTERS, & USED
BOOKS of all types.

dicted the crowded field of -nod-
erate, liberal and radical candi
dates could bring another con-
servative victory. Those oppos-
ing the conservative hopefuls
included 'Beck, Cash, Chikofsky,
Israel, Mann, and Simpson.
According to board member
Henry Johnson, also University
Vice President for Student Ser-
vices, "A fantastic number of
excellent candidates have been
competing over the liberal vote
- and they've tended to negate
one another."
The surprise element in June's
election, however, a prolifera-
tion of conservative candidates.
On election night, outgoing
school board member Theodore
Heusel claimed Israel won a
seat because of a crowded con-
servative field. Besides the7
three Republican-backed candi-
dates - Barhydt, Wright, and
Bielby - hopefuls Binder and
Kolasa split.the conservative
support, Heusel contended.
AFTER THE millage defeat,
Secretary to the Board of Edu-
cation Leroy Cappaert' said he
could not predict the precise
budget cuts which will result
from the los of hoped-for re-
venues.
The millage would have gen-
erated $1 million annually for
the next five years.
SThe schools had not prepared
a list of items to be 'cut from
the operating budget in case the
millage failed. Although Super-
intendent Harry Howard h a d
proposed ways of spending the
millage revenue, Cappaert said
the items in that proposal, in-
cluding creation of curriculum
co-ordinator and attendance
posts, will not necessarily lose
their funding, since the board
can revise the whole school
budget.
GONE PANNING
SAN FRANCISCO UPI -
"The Californian," the state's'
first- newspaper, was published
in 1846-1848. It went out of busi-
ness because its readers and
advertisers had left for the gold
fields.

The book can also be used for the University Theatre Showcase, to be selected from: The House of
Bernarda Alba, No Place To Be Somebody, Moonchildren, The Lost Days of Mrs. Lincoln, The Real
Inspector Hound and others.

In addition, this book
contains discount cou-
pons for Professional
Theatre Program off-
erings.
Come into the PTP
offices at Mendelssohn
Theatre Building and
ask about it. Or mail
the form below. Good
entertainment. Cheap
price. Just like old
times.

.................. ...... .........mum---m-.--rnmmmm-m --i--m.-m.m--.
MAIL ORDER FORM;
I U
' U - M S t u d e n t I . D . _ __Na m eP h o n e_ _
S Name__________ ___________Phone
I I
Address ___
Street City State Zip I
* Please Make Checks Payable to U of M (Lmit-2 Books)
Mail To: Univ. Theatre Proqrams No. of Books y
*Mendelssohn Theatre
Ann Arbor, Michiqan 48104 Price each _
Plays, Schedules Subject to Change Total
Stamped Hold at the
j Self-addressedBodath
Envelope Enclosed Box Office
. Signature..
' mQ mmm .m mm mmmm Dm mm m mmm mm mmmm m

i

11

I

I

Have You Noticed?
WE'VE EXPANDED TO
SERVE YOU BETTER!
Come In and Check Out Our
NEW Stock items:
" Student Office Furniture
" SCM and Olympia Typewriters
" Full-Line Electronic Calculators
" Great Assortment of Office Supplies
" Gift Ideas
Office Supply House
613 E. WILLIAM-665-3763
MON.-FRI. 8-5; SAT. 9-1

I

I

IF

Sirrian

:43atl

I

E We at "The Michigan Daily" would like to take this oppor-
tunity to welcome you to the University of Michigan and Ann
Arbor-whether for the first or tenth time. As you may or may
not know, the "Daily" is the voice of the students here at the
University. It is managed and edited by the students under
the protective eyes of the Board for Student Publications
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We consider it to be the main difference between us and other
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our classified ads are filled with interesting personals as well as the normal informative

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Best Wishes,
The '74-'75 "DAILY" Staff
Mark Sancrainte, Business Manager
Dan Biddle, Editor
Marc Feldman, Sports Editor

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