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December 11, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-12-11

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, December 11, 1974

3
9
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li_. _ __._. . .. _. ._ _. .I

$54,000 CONCE ALED:
Governor admits to
CREEP cover-up

ers

I

ce

Report

to

the

University Community

GOVERNING
STRUCTURE
The University Cellar is an agency of
the University under the direct control
of a student-faculty-administrator Board
of Directors. The Board is composed of 6
students appointed by Student Govern-
ment Council, 3 faculty appointed by the
faculty Senate assembly and 1 admin-
istrator appointed by the President of the
University. Through this Board of Direc-
tors the Cellar is responsive to the needs
and desires of the entire University
Community.
The Cellar is incorporated as a Mich-
igan non-profit corporation and is gov-
erned by both State and Federal regula-
tions on non-profit organizations. Any
funds earned by the corporation are re-
tained for operating capital.
Any student of the University may be
appointed to the Board of Directors. In
order to insure that the Board is repre-
sentative of a spectrum of the student
community, the bylaws provide that no
more than two members can be from
any one school or college and that at
least two members must be undergrad-
uates and two members must be gradu-
ate students.
Two or three student seats will be
filled in the near future. Persons inter-
ested in being on the Cellar Board of
Directors should contact the Student
Government Council at 763-3241.
The current members of the Board of Directors

are:
Paul Drever
Thomas Easthone
Allan Feldt
Steve Goede
Jim Heceman
Donald Hornstein
Georqe Isaac
David Kopplin
Gerald Krone
James Miller

student 764-6093
admin 764-7420
faculty 763-4190
student 764-0722
student 994-0062
student 994-0016
student 761-6455
faculty 763-4532
student 662-6678
faculty 763-2189

PERSONNEL
POLICIES-
The University Cellar has always fol-
lowed a policy of offering employment
on an equitable basis to all who apply.
Anyone who applies during the pre-
scribed pericds of time (see below) has
an excellent chance of being hired to
work during book rush. The following
are the official policies of the University
Cellar in regards to hiring:
1) Applications are taken for a spe-
cific period of time preior to each
Book Rush for that Rush only. All ap-
plications taken between the 1st and
the 15th of October will receive equal
consideration for Winter Book Rush.
All aoplications taken between the 1st
and 8th of April and the 1 st and 8th
of June will receive equal considera-
tion for Fall Book Rush.
2) All applications taken during the
times indicated in (1) will be random-
ly placed into hiring order by the em-
ployees Personnel Committee.
3) The Cellar will take applications
at all times other than those in ( I),
however, these applications will be
placed in hiring order by date of ap-
plication and will receive priority after
those taken in (1).
4) After March 31st all unused appli-
cations from Winter Rush will be
thrown away. After September 30th,
all unused applications from Fall Rush
will be thrown away. It is necessary
to apply during the time periods in-
dicated in (1 ) for each Rush you wish
to be considered for. No unused appli-
cations from any Rush will be kept on
file for any future Rushes.
5) Former Rush employees, in good
standing, will receive first priority for
Rush hiring over all new applicants
and need not re-apply for future
Rushes.
6) After Book Rush is over, if a per..
manent position becomes open, all
Rush employees from the Rush prior
to the hiring period who are available
to take the job are considered. The
selection is made solely on the basis
of ability shown during the Rush
period.
7) When a specialized job opening is
available, the job is advertised and
hiring is based on the qualifications
of the applicant. This is the only area
where working a Book Rush is not the
criteria for being hired for a perma-
nent job.
As you will note, all qualified appli-
cants are given hiring priority on a ran-
dom basis. Because no discretionary cri-
teria are used in hiring procedures, no
abuse of hiring authority is possible. This
insures that the Cellar will not turn into
an organization staffed by the friends
of those who do the hiring.
Any questions or complaints concern-
ing our hiring policies should be directed
to our Personnel Secretary and/or Per-
sonnel Committee.
FINANCIAL-
An additional goal of the University
Cellar is to generate enough working
capital internally to allow the elimina-
tion of the $5 rolling assessment. The
$78,000 in retained earnings from fiscal
1974 will make the elimination of the
assessment possible in the near future.

Retained earnings are projected to be
significantly lower in years to come.
The accompany statement of opera-
tions and balance sheet are intended to
give you a general idea of our financial
picture. There are complete copies of
our audited statements available either
by mail or in person. People are available

UNIVERSITY CELLAR, INC.
BALANCE SHEET as of May 31, 1974

ASSETS
CURRENT ASSETS:
Cash
Accounts receivable:
Trade $ 23,651.60
Vendors 32,323.09
55,974.69
Less, Allowance for
uncollectible accounts 5,212.56
Inventory
Deposits and prepaid expenses
Total current assets
PROPERTY AND EQUIPMENT, AT COST
Equipment 48,073.51
Building improvements and fixtures 85,037.54

$ 41,610.24

a
a

50,762.13
521,335.77
4,099.94
617,808.08

DATLY OFFICTAL RTT .FTIN
t .:".:.J sv':~.J". ..;.ty"; .".1';,.e i :i::"::if, :..a ;..";. ; """. ;::.".s r.r..":":"i.;":::.!!"4

133,111.05

Less, Accumulated
depreciation
TOTAL ASSETS

54,973.78

78,137.27
695,945.35

LIABILITIES AND CAPITL
CURRENT LIABILITIES:
Accounts payable
Taxes withheld from employees
Accrued payroll and other expenses
Total current liabilities
STUDENT ASSESSMENT DEPOSITS PAYABLE
CAPITAL:
Contributed capital:
Board of Regents 100,000.00
Students 70,800.00
Earnings, retained for operating
capital 142,240.96
Total capital
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL

161,275.66
3,609.90
51,388.83
216,274.39
166,630.00

Day Calendar
Wednesday, December 11
Classes End.
WUOM: Panel discussion, "Who
Runs Our Public Schools?" with Al-!
bert Shanker, Pres.. Amer. Federa-
tion of Teachers, & Carl Marbur-
ger. chief spokesperson, National
Committee. Citizens in Educ., 10
am.
I.R.S.: iisheSdow, "One of Them,"
6050 IS R, noon.
Women's Studies: Nancy Seifer,
"Working Class Women in America
Today." Conf. Rm., 2, League, noon.
Computing Ctr.: Prof. R. Phillips,
CICE. "Spires: A Data-Base Man-
agement System for Use in MTS,"
130 P&A Bldg.. noon.
Theoretical Seminar: D. Politzer,
Harvard, "Quarks, Gluons. and the
Renormalization Group." 2038 Ran-
doll Lab.. noon.
Physics: James Ball, Oak Ridge
Nat'l. Lab.. "The Heavy Ion Accel-
erator at Oak Ridge." P&A Colloq
Rm., 4 pm.
CREES: Leo Mates. former Yugo-
slav. ambassador to U.S., "East-West
Relations in Europe," E. Conf. Rm.,
Rackham, 4 pm.
Industrial & Operations Eng.:
Prof. R. Baum, "A Model to Access
Resource. Policy, and Scheduling
Decisions for the Baker Hospital
Radiology Department, with the De-
velopment of a Five Year Ex-
pansion Plan." 229 W. Eng., 4 pm.
Music School: Wind Ensemble,
Harry McTerry, conductor, Wood-
wind Quintet, Geo. Cavender, guest
conductor, Hill And.; Seigfried Fink,
percussionist, Recital Hall; 8 pm.
both events.
UM-Dearborn: "Winter Festival
Concert," Edsel Ford High School
Aud., 8:30 pm.
Dance: "Solstice: A Celebration of
Dance. Concert I.' Barbour Studio,
9 pm.
Career Planning and Placement
3280 SAB, 764-7460
Job Interviews for Srs: Specific
information on conference in Ch)-

sago, Grand Rapids, Canton & To-
ledo. Ohio, & Philadelphia., PA.
ata ilable at CP&P.
Full tuition for grad, study in
Mktg. at U. of Cincinnati & train-
ing offered by Burke Mktg. Re-
search: write.: Sanford Cooper.
Pres. 1529 MadisonaRd.. Conn., OT
45206.
One-vear's Master's degree in
.Journaism, Colimbia U. for hu-
manities & science majors; write:
Asst. Dean, Grad. School of Jour-
nalism. Columbia U., NYC; 10027.
Mauer of Public Admin, Penn
St. U. new program. Prerequisites:
acetg.. econ, statistics, GRE (apti-
tude test only> must be taken in
Dec. or .Jan. for June admission.
Tl'ti 11 mo.rogram prenares for
C(ix Mxt., Urban Planning, 'Pub.
Poliev Analysis. Health Care Plan
ii ug. & general gov't. admin. posi-
tions. Grad. Program in Urban Stu-
dies. some financial aid available.
Washington U.. St, Louis - to pre-
pare for urban planning & admin..
social policy development, & ethnic
policies. Contact: Glen Hold, 252
McMillan Hall, Washington U. Spe-
cial Program in Alcohol & Drug
Addiction Community Education at
Western Mich. U. Contact: Dr. Thos.
Williams. 857 Buckhout St., WMU,
Kalamazoo 49008.
intenational Relations Graduate
Fellowships, U. of Denver; joint
programs in Law, Admin., Econ.,
& Soo!.: deadline: Feb. 15; write:
Dean, Grad. School, U. of Denver,
Denver, CO. 80210 CP&P will be
closed December 20--January 6,
1975.
ya~mmer lacemnent
3204 SAB
Apul. deadline for Park Ranger
03, Michigan Oen Exam, Dec. 16.
'74: applications available. Green-
field Village / Henry Ford Museum,
Dearborn; information on interview
schedule now available. Summer
Federal Service' Exam - deadline
for applying for January test is
December 13. Applications available.

WASHIIJNGTON (A") - Former !
Montana Gov. Tim Babcock
nl-aded guilty yesterday to ille-
P ally concealing the origin of
'54,000 in nolitical contributions
from multi-millionaire Armand
Hammer to the 1972 Nixon re-
election campaign.
Hammer, a global patron of
the arts and chairman of the
Occidental Petroleum Corp., is
under investigation for similar
charges, the Special' aWtergate
Prosecutor's office said.
BABCOCK, 55, a Republican,
admitted that from September
1972 to June 1974 he "did aid
and abet Armand Hammer in
the commission of the of-1
fense . . ."
A criminal information, or
charge, filed in U.S. District
Court said Babcock made three
deliveries in cash from Hammer
to the Finance Committee to Re-I
elect the President.
Instead of listing Hammer as:
the contributor, he identified =
five other persons, including
himself, as the source of the
funds. The other four were Jer-
ome Anderson, Elmer Balsam,
Gordon Doerine, and Willard
Tolter, a state Republican offi-
cial in Montana.
NO LEGAL action was exnect-
ed by the special prosecutor'
office against the four men
whose names were used in mak-
ing the contributions.
Babcock at the time was a
vice nresident for Occidental In-
ternationnl, a subsidiary of
IUmmer's narent firm.
The former governor is the

current owner and manager of
radio and television station KT-
CM and the owner of a motel in
Helena.
CHIEF U.S. District Judge
George Hart postponed senten-
cing. Babcock could be senten-
ced to a maximum one year in
jail or fined $1,000 or both on
the misdemeanor charge.
Hammer, 76, lived for many
years in the Soviet Union and
last May helped negotiate a $780
million loan to that country to
help finance construction of a
huge fertilizer compley.
The loan, negotiated through
U.S. Export-Import Bank, was
described at the time as the
largest ever by the institution
for the Soviet Union.
HAM MER, who has collected
millions of dollars worth of art
works, was challenged by the
Tnternal Revenue Service ear-
lier this year on the value he
claimed for paintings and sculp-
ture.
The TRS said Hammer owed
$154.000 in additional taxes for
1966 and 1967, saving he overes-
timated the value of two paint-
ings donated to the University of
Southern California and a sculp-
t're given to the Lyndon Baines
Jol'nson Library in Texas.
A letter from former Skecial
P~roseitor Leon Jaworski to
Rahhock's lawyers accompanied
his guilty nlea.
Th~aletter dated Aug. 21, 1974,
s=id Bahco(-k agrees to testify
as a witness in any legal pro-
+-ii- connected with the con-
triblitions.

313,040.96
$695,945.35

HISTORY-
The University Cellar started out as a
project of the Student Government Coun-
cil. Originally it was located in about
300 square ft. in the Student Activities
Building. During the first 8 months of
operation the Cellar (then known as the
University Store) did a gross business of
$40,000. In the fall of 1969, students
pushed for and won the right to create
a student controlled bookstore. Up until
this time the University Store had not
been allowed to sell books. To provide
the operating capital two things were
done. $100,000 was transferred from the
old student parking fund, which was
being held by the University for a stu-
dent project. The student body, in a
record turn-out vote, assessed themselves
a rolling $5.00 fee to capitalize the
store. The vote passed by more than a
ten to one margin. Since that time the
U n i v e r s i t y Cellar has grown into a
$2,500,000 per year operation occupy-
ing more than 10,000 sq. ft. in the
Michigan Union Building and operating
another 10,000 sq. ft. of warehouse
space.
During the Summer of 1974, the Uni-
versity Cellar opened a branch store in
the North Campus Commons serving the
students of the A & D School and the
Mu-ic School.
PURPOSE-
The University Cellar exists for the
purpose of providing services and pro-
ducts to the University Community
which would either be over-priced or un-
available without the Cellar. Toward this
purpose the Cellar has not only offered
low prices but forced other area busi-
nesses to lower their prices. When the
Cellar introduced the Xerox Service, the
cheapest price available in town was 9c
per copy. The Cellar has not only forced

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS
for the year ended May 31, 1974

SALES:
Merchandise
Commissions and other
Total sales
COST OF SALES
Gross profit
OPERATING EXPENSES:

$2,693.808.27
16,891.90
2,710,700.17
2,059,491.10
651,209.07

Advertising
Data processing
Depreciation

$

Dues and subscriptions
Freight
Insurance:
Health contribution
Workmen's compensation and
retirement
Fire, burglary,
liability, bonding

9,850.21
2,047.95
16,723.86
2,254.26
5,855.27
1,748.47
1,687.99
7,659.66

Buy two--
Get one Free!
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Memorex will mail
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buy two C-90's at
regular price. a
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549 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Office expense
Outside services
Payroll taxes
Postage
Professional fees
Rent
Rentals, miscellaneous
Repair and maintenance
Salaries and wages
Supplies
Telephone and telex
Truck expense
Uncollectible accounts
Utilities
Miscellaneous
Earnings from operations
Interest income
Interest exoense

444.29
10,350.82
9,197.95
2,292.93
7,829.12
66,352.60
r 44021

38
1
1

6,120.32
6,611.15
5,193.45
2,996.84 DON'T WORRY ABOUT THE COLD.
684.35
2,000.00 Keep warm this winter in one of our
1,412.30 HANDMADE LAMB FUR COATS I
2,297.44 577.051.44 (some hooded)
74,157.63
6,465.34100% WOOL HANDKNIT
MITTENS, GLOVES, AND SOCKS
2.019.65 '80,622.97

I

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