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December 08, 1974 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-12-08

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nday, December 8,1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
____BRITT, JOHNSON LEAD 78-74 WIN:

gage seven

olverines

edge

VoIs
of play. Co-Captain Joe Johnson
provided the reason for se'ond
half metamorphosis.
"This was the first time we'd
seen a zone. And we had to
play much of the first half
against it with our more inex-
eriendnla ers. Thev were

By JEFF SCHILLER
Plagued in the first half
by severe foul trouble and
costly mistakes, Michigan's
basketball t e a m came

I

cl

L1 U dhUU iUaL.?'5aol

a brief shoving match, an in-
evitability in view of the in-
tense game-long physical ba tle.
Tempers flared, and the Ten-
nessee star's collision v i t h
'Little Joe' touched off a heated'
controversy.
ORR EXPLAINED it ibis

storming back to register a
78-74 victory over the Ten-
nessee Volunteers yester-
day at Crisler Arena.
The Wolverine triumph
overshadowed a brilliant
34 point performance by
T e n n e s s e e 's sensa- which held
tional freshman Bernard out a shot f
King. game's wa
King, whom Michigan coach the Wolveri
Johnny Orr called "the best Michigan'
freshman basketball player I've almost imm
ever seen," also found time to guard Stev
engage in an altercation with three fouls
guard Joe Johnson midway utes into1
through the final period, which Wayman B
helped spark the Wolverine experienced
comeback. later in the
Rick White put Michigan were force
ahead to stay with a three-point which incl
play, 73-70, with only 2:24 re- (Dave Baxt
maining in the game. Tennessee son) anda
battled back, but clutch points Robinson) w
by Wayman Britt and Steve experience.

NIGHT E
RICH LERNER a
a tenacious defense
the Volunteers with-
or 45 seconds in the
ing moments, iced
ne victory.
s problems began
aediately. Sophomore
e Grote picked up
less than four min-
the contest. When
ritt and C.J. Kupec
similar troubles
half, the Wolverines
d to use a lineup
uded two freshmen
er and Joel Thomp-
a sophomore (John
with almost no game

V ols bushwhacked

White
Britt
Kupec
Johnson
Grote
Baxter
Thompson
Robinson
Team
TOTALS
King
Jackson

MICHIGAN (78)
FG FT R
4- 8 1-2 9
12-18 0- 0 6
3-11 4- 4 8
8-14 7- 8 4
2- 5 2- 3 7,
2-3 0-0 1
1- 2 0- 1 1
0- 2 0- 2 3
4
32-63 14-20 38
TENNESSEE (74)
FG FT R
13-26 8- 9 13
5-13 10-10 4

F
4
3
3
1
0

TP
9
24
10
23
6
4
2
0

Ashworth
Clark
Woods
Joyce
Brykalski
Finestone
Crean
Team
TOTALS

3- 6
3- 9
3-10
0- 1
0- 0
0- 0
0- 0

0-
0-
0-
0-
2-
0-
0-

0
0
0
0
z
0
0

9
5
2
0
0

5
3
5
2
1
0
2

6
6
6
0
2
0
0

27-65 20-213
Score by Periods

38

24 74

way, "He (King) slugged Jae understandably nervous, and
DITORS: Johnson. Johnson was bleeding that added to our problems. I
End BILL CRANE from the neck. Then Johnson thought we showed a lot more
made a mistake by hitting him poise in the second half."
back. When they called the foul THE VOLS were left to mut-
on Johnson, everyone got very ter that things would have been
MICHIGAN managed to stay upset and jumped off the different had they posszssed the
within striking distance largely upetc evcso ijrdsa ri
through the efforts of Britt and bench." services of injured star Ernie
Jhonh thoedtsheBlttand Michigan's surge began soon Grunfeld. Orr conceded that "it
Johnson who paced the Blue ef- afterwards. The Wolverine floor would have been a different
fort with 24 and 23 points, re- game started clicking, and their game had he played," but re-
spectively. During a stretch of shooting was phenomenal. White fused to concede that a healthy
almost 11 minutes during the hit a couple of key jumpers and Grunfeld would have changed
first half they combined for 22 Kupec finally got untracked. Jee the outcome.
points, the Wolverines' entire Johnson tied the score with 8:01 The Wolverine players are
offensive production during that remaining, and the lead never tired of hearing about how ;m-
period- grew greater than two points portant superstars (like Campy
The defense atso Cept Mich- in either direction until White Russell) are. Asked the inevit-
igan in the game. The Wolver- initiated the final heroics. able, "How good would you
ines held Tennessee to 31 per guys be with Camp?" Joe John-
cent from the field in the open- BOTH SIDES agreed that in- son said angrily:
ing stanza, and used a limited exnerience was responsible for "It hasn't made that much of
zone press to force the Vols the contest's large number of a difference. We've got some
into costly turnovers-three in turnovers-17 by each team. great ballplayers in our own
the space of less than a minte. Michigan, however, avoided the right. We play 7ell together,
A different Michigan tam mistakes late in the . contest, and the new players give us a
took the floor in the second half. committing only one of its 17 lot more depth than we had last
The cagers committed 13 turn-~
Tov ers theopenigeod, ut miscues in the last 18 minues year.
overs in the opening period, but
were guilty of only four such :":..,. ....s.............. .. ?3. ....
mistakes in the final 20 mm- 4
utes. The most startling statis-
tic of all-Tennessee made 19 BmeU t SLV
for 19 from the foul line in the
first half but only one for two
in the second stanza.
The exchange between Kingas
and Johnson was the turningr
point. Only moments before, special To The Daily
King and Kupec had engaged in CHAMPAIGN -- The Michigan swim team success-
fully completed its opening weekend of conference action
r last night by narrowly defeating Illinois, 63-60. The Michi-
gan tankers anticipated and had a tough battle from the
dangerous Illini and the end result was achieved largely
N N through the superlative efforts of the veteran Wolverine
r} tankers who came through when the heat was on.
The opening event of the meet, the 400 yard 'medley
1 s h I 9) relay, was viewed by Michigan mentor Gus Stager as
a "must" win for the Blue and the unit of Rob Helt,
Pat Bauer, John Daly and Gordon Downie came through
second overtime in as many with a clocking of 3:36.4 to nip the Illini. The Illinois
nights. tankers countered this loss with three consecutive
The Irish controlled the firsts in the 1000, 200, and the 50 yard freestyle events.
puck at the outset of the ex-
k tra peri. utt Mhigax- Junior Tom Szuba captured two firsts with a time of
tra period. But Michigan 1:58.4 in the 200 yard individual medley and a 1:56.5 in the
home hisk 20th go o hed 200 yard butterfly. Szuba also swam a leg in the winning
home his 20th goal of the year
from close range. freestyle relay. Helt, Bauer and Downie also captured firsts
The victory was the sixth in in the 200 yard backstroke, 200 yard breaststroke and 500
the Wolverines' last eight out - yard freestyle, respectively.
ings, and upped their WCHA re- Don Craine took both the one and three-meter diving
cord to 7-5 and their overall events, piling up 300.6 points on the one meter board and
mark to 9-.5. 318.71 on the three meter. Freshman Curt Wilson came
Next weekend Michigan will through with two clutch second place performances on
take on the Spartans in a home- the boards with point totals of 254.1 on the one-meter and
and-home series to close out the
1974 portion of this league sea- 271.7 on the three-meter.
son. "agm e gen aW sm ::\'mA "":ti:::::" " ".Y':":: ':}: \"" .*" 4 .

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
C.J. KUPEC grabs one of his eight rebounds for Michigan from Tennessee's Bernard King in
yesterday's game between the Volunteers and the Wolverines. Kupec and King bumped heads
throughout the contest and King, a freshman from Brooklyn, scored 34 points. But it was not
enough-the Maize and Blue came through, 78-74.
- - - -- -- - - - - -

17 78

F
3
5

TP
34
20

MICHIGAN
Tennessee
Officials: Art White,
Attendance-6131

1
40
43
Dick

2
38
31
Pace

T
78
74

full court
____E- s

SWE IN, 5-4:

1
i

wears decries. . .
. violent game
By AL HRAPSKY
"WHEN AN SEC team comes up north to play, to them its
like the Civil War all over again." C. J. Kupec.
It might as well have been the Civil War yesterday as a
vehement and volatile crowd of 6,131 witnessed one of the most
physically brutal and emotional games played in Crisler Arena in
recent years.
Facing early foul trouble, nagging turnovers and a couple
of altercations between the Vols' freshman sensation Bernard
King and several Michigan players, the Wolverines, proved
one thing-they can play tough basketball under adverse con-!
ditions.
By asking Volunteer coach Ray Mears, who insisted last
week that Michigan was exclusively a football school, he would
tell you that the game was too tough.
"I think they (Michigan) did exactly what they planned to
do and that was to intimidate King. They really worked him over
physically.
"The best way to take care of a threat like King is to keep
him on the bench and I think they were trying to get him worked
up to the point of throwing a punch."
Mears was referring to the extremely physical game that,
sent Steve Grote to the bench with three fouls after a mere three
minutes and then Wayman Britt with four infractions with about;
four minutes left in the half. Three Tennessee players fouled out.
The match-up of Kupec and King, which involved a constant
pushing and shoving match for position under the boards, was the
main object of Mears' dissatisfaction and he made it perfectly
clear that this type of basketball is non-existent in the environs
of the South.
"I thought it was a pretty rough game with a lot of give
and take under there," Mears said. "You put Kupec down in
the South and he wouldn't get away with that stuff, he'd foul
out in a minute. My boy (King) wvas elbowing back for posi-
tion."

-Blue
By FRED UPTON
Special To The Daily
SOUTH BEND - Angie Mor-
etto scored at 3:18 of overtime,
giving Michigan a 5-4 victory
and a split of the weekend ser-
ies with Notre Dane.
"We had to win and we did,"
Michigan coach Dan Farrell
said. "We had to play over an
awful lot of difficulties."
Those difficulties were a pair
of game misconduct penalties
to Wolverines Greg Fox and
Gary Morrison in the second
period. The two will also sit out
next Friday night's game at
Michigan State.
The Wolverines drew first
blood when Morrison scored on
a passout from the corner in the
game's first minute.
Notre Dame's Allen Kars-
nia tied the score when he
converted a rebound of Tim
Beyers' breakaway shot.
Once again the Notre Dame
power play almost proved fatal
as it did Friday night. A rough-
ing penalty to Tom Lindskog
carried into the second period,
and Notre Dame controlledrthe
puck from the opening draw,
scoring 14 seconds into the stan-
za for a 2-1 lead.
Then the fisticuffs broke out.
Morrison tore into Irish winger
Don Jackson, and almost had
the jersey pulled off Jackson
before the referee finally sepa-
rated the pair.

de kers
But apparently Jackson want- four - on-
ed more of Morrison, who game upt
wasn't to be denied again, and ther squa
Jackson was soon sprawled on on its bre
the ice. With ju
Also squaring away were maining i
Wolverine Greg Fox and No- the Irish
tre Dame's Kevin Nugent. power pla
Morrison, Fox, and Nugent Notre
were all evicted. out to a
Michig n then tied the score stanza w
2-2 when Rob Palmer fed Kris kle of a
Manery who tipped the puck man tri
between Peterson's legs. son who
Later in the period, Brian through
Walsh was awarded a penalty who was
shot when Palmer pulled him ter Rick
down from behind on a break- legiate s
away. Zimmerman did not need Michigan
to answer the challenge as Followin
Walsh's shot was over the net. goal, the
Doug Lindskog put Michigan sloppy on
ahead 3-2 when he scored on a Michiga
rebound. Peterson was down tied the
and Lindskog flipped the puck of the pe
over the fallen goaltender. It Peterson
was Lindskog's fourth goal of goal. The
the season. back to
Penalties to Alex Pirus and that was
Doug Lindskog for high-stick- first two
ing allowed the teams to play score car
Irish blighted

- four and opened the
considerably. But nei-
d was able to capitalize
akaway opportunities.
st twelve seconds re-
i the period, however,
tied the score on a
ay goal by Pat Conroy.
Dame then jumped
4-3 lead in the third.
'hen a shot off the an-
a Wolverine defense-
ckled back to Jack-
o fired a slap shot
Frank Zimmerman,
back in the nets aft-
Palmer's first col-
tart in Friday night's
loss.
ig Notre Dame's lead
play became rather
both sides.
n's Frank Werner
score at the mid-point
riod when he decked
to notch his fifth
e play then reverted
the aggressive style
characteristic of the
periods, but the tie
ried Michigan into its
THIRD PERIOD
G: 7. ND -- Jackson
,Conroy) 5:16; S. M --
iughes, Moretto) 10:41.
OVERTIME
G: 9. Moretto (Trudeau,
3:18.
RING BY PERIODS
1 2 1 1-5
e 1 2 1 0---4

i
,I
I
i
t

____ _.

FRANKOWIAK SHINES:

Chips
By The Associated Press
WICHITA FALLS, Tex.-Cen-
tral Michigan quarterback Mike
Franckowiak scored one touch-
down and passed for another
and the Chippewas' defense in-
tercepted six Louisiana Tech
passes as fourth-ranked CMU
upset the number one Bulldogs
35-14 in the fourth annual Pio-
neer Bowl yesterday.
FRANCKOWIAK led a bruising
Chippewa offensive attack in
ending the nation's longest win-

top,

La.

Tech

FIRST PERIOD
SCORING: 1. M - Morrison (Mor-
etto, Palmer) 0:54; 2. ND - Kars-
nlia (Byers, Bourque) 7:44.
SECOND PERIOD
SCORING: 3. ND - Hamilton
(Conroy) 0:14 pp; 4. M - Manery
(Palmer) 3:52; 5. MI - D. Lindskog
(Maurer, Manery) 11:48; 6. ND -
Conroy (Walsh, Hamilton) 19:48 pp.

SCORING
(Fairholm,
Werner (Hi
SCORING
Hughes) 3
SCOT
MICHIGAN
Notre Dam

ning streak. Tech had won its
previous 23 games.
The victory in the NCAA Di-
vision II semifinal c o n t e s t
moved CMU into the national
college division final next Sat-
urday against Delaware in the
Camelia Bowl at Sacramento,
Calif.
CMU put two touchdowns on
the scoreboard in just over .P2
minutes of the second quarter.
Sophomorett ailba c k Walt
Hodges grabbed a bad pitch

i
i
G

Indiana trounces Kentucky;
Davidson hoops Ohio State

"Kupec is a powerful guy and he uses his body well."
Granted, Kupec is a physical player and why not
230 pounds? One must question the angelic glow which
insists surrounds his 6-6, 195 star scorer, who was raised
Brooklyn playgrounds.

from senior quarterback Fran-
ckowiak on the first bounce and
raced 55 yards to the Tech one-
yard line op the second play of
a 60-yard drive. Hodges banged
over to make it 7-0 with 14:09
left in the half.
LINEBACKER Bill Schmidt
intercepted a pass by Tech
quarterback Steve Haynes on
the Bulldogs' next possessian
and returned it 31 yards to the
Tech 14.
Coach Roy Kramer credited
his defense with locking lip the
Chippewas' victory.
"Defense was the key again,"
Kramer explained. "We had to
take away the big play that
Charles McDaniels was capable
of making and we did."
McDANIELS, Tech's leading
all-time rusher, was held to 45
yards in 14 carries and fullback
Ronald Harper, the Bulldogs'
second all time rusher, also was
limited to 45 yards in 10 carries.
However, it was six pass in-
terceptions that helped lead 'he
fourth-ranked Chippewas into
the n a t i o n a 1 championship
game.
Blue jayvees
overwhelm.
Oakland VR's

at 6-8,
Mears
on the

After five minutes had elapsed in the initial stanza, King,
frustrated with Kupec's Dave Cowens style of defense, retaliated
with a vigorous elbow. Kupec who said that the game was the
most physical he's ever played was reluctant to comment on the
confrontation. But he calmly admitted that "He gave me a real
good shot."
Later in the second half when King lost the ball out of
bounds, he accidently bumped into Steve Grote, touching off
a brief physical 'exchange with an angered Joe Johnson
standing a few feet away.
Johnny Orr, who flew off the bench in a fit of rage, insisted
that King sent the first blow. He protested vehemently to the
officials, but the referees apparently only saw Johnson retaliate
and called an intentional foul.
"Little Joe" played down the whole scene, calmly explaining
that "He was excited and I was excited. It was just one of those
things that happen in a basketball game."
Mears, however, could not accept this as just another game
insisting that "our league doesn't play that kind of basketball."
He also defended King's actions-who if judged by the deafening
and hostile noise level of the crowd, seemed to be over reacting-
by explaining "I have a right to protect our players, and I have
a right to coach my ball club just like Johnny has a right to
coach his. He (King) was just retaliating after Kupec got him a
couple of good ones."
Probably the most valid argument that the Vols coach
could offer, was that the freshman King had become frus-
trated by the brnite physical nature of the game. The ques-
tinn renmains whathernr renwt RTims will hp nhln tee ran his nnasea

By The Associated Press
BLOOMINGTON-Center Kent
Benson, dominating the middle,
scored 11 straight points in the
second half and finished with a
game-high 26 yesterday, lead-
ing third-ranked Indiana's 98-74
college basketball victory over
No. 15 Kentucky.
Indiana never trailed,
breezing to its third straight
victory this season. Kentucky,
led by Kevin Grevey with 22
points, dropped to 2-1.
Scott May scored 25 points for
the Hoosiers, 15 of those in the
first half when Indiana raced

to a 54-38 lead at halftime. Steve
Green added 15.
* * *
Buckeyes burn
CHARLOTTE - Larry Horo-
witz sank 16 points and grabbed
10 rebounds in the second half
to lead Davidson from a 15-
point deficit to an 88-80 basket-
ball victory over Ohio State.
Horowitz, who finished with i
25 points and 14 rebounds, got 1
assistance from teammates Jay
Powell and Greg Dunn in fash-l
ioning a comeback in the last
12 minutes.
Down 64-49 at the 12:37

mark, Davidson shifted to a
full court press which caused
a rash of turnovers and per-
sonal fouls for Ohio State.
The strategy cost Ohio State
the services of Bill Andreas,
who fouled out in the final
eight minutes with 26 points
and seven rebounds.
With Andreas gone, Davidson
reeled off 27 points to 9 for the
Buckeyes. The Wildcats went
ahead for the first time on a
layup by Horowitz at the 4:57
mark.
* * *
Houston tarred
HOUSTON - Mitch Kupchak
pumped in 31 points to lead
ninth-ranked North Carolina to
a 96-87 college basketball vic-
tory over Houston.
North Carolina led 49-44 at
the half but the 20th-ranked
Cougars tied it at 55-55 about
three minutes deep on Louis
Dunbar's three-point play and
took a 57-55 lead seconds later
on Dunbar's layup.
The teams exchanged two-

d.

SCORES

BIG TEN BASKETBALL
Michigan 78, Tennessee 74
Michigan state 92, Eastern
Michigan 60
Wisconsin 86, Iowa State 84
Indiana 98, Kentucky 74
Illinois 96, DePauw 53
Kansas 89, Iowa 54
Northwestern 71, Ohio
University 68
Davidson 88, Ohio State 80
OTHER
Notre Dame 80, Princeton 66
Western Michiean 101. Northern

Oklahoma 90, South Carolina 84
Marquette 93, St. Mary's
(California) 66
West virginia 86, Villanova 80
Maryland 99, Long Island 84
Toledo 82, Ball St. 63
NFL
Minnesota 23, Atlanta 10
Dallas 41, Cleveland 17
NCAA Soccer championship
Howard 2, St. Louis 1 (four OT)
NBA
Washington 94, Detroit 89
Phiilaelhia 116. Buffalo 112

The Michigan varsity-reserve
basketball team held the Oak-
land Jayvees scoreless for
nearly eight minutes of the
second half to score 26 unan-
swered points and swamped the
Pioneers 97-55 at Crisler Arena
yesterday.
Leading 63-49 with 11:20 re-
maining in the game, Greg
Ford found Bill Ziegler wide
open on a back-door play to
ignite the onslaught. Ziegler
scored four field goals during
the streak, as did Bill Lelich, a

Y r { ,
..

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