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December 06, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-12-06

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., ,- _ _

Friday, December 6, 1974
Teheran
airport
roof
collapses
TEHERAN (Reuter) - At
least 2S people are known to
have died when the ceiling of
the main lobby of the Mehrabad
airport terminal collapsed yes-
terday, according to govern-
ment radio and television re-
ports.
The reports said 25 bodies had
been recovered from the de-
bris by late afternoon as res-
cuers toiled in heavy snow to
find survivors.
MANY were also reported in-
jured, but there was no offic-
ial casualty figure. Earlier re-
ports put the number of injured
at 50.
Normally, several hundred
people gather in the terminal
building. But a heavy snow-
storm had caused the cancella-
tion of many local flights, re-r
ducing the usual number of
people.
The 20-year-old, single-story1
concrete building, which had no
central supporting pillars, was
the only terminal used for bothI
international and domestic
flights.
YESTERDAY'S catastrophe1
halted all flights.I
While welders tried to cut
steel beams and remove the de-t
bris, one official at the scene4
said it could take more than 24
hours to clear the area. 7
Army and fire units rushed
to Mehrabad airport, six miles1
from the center of Teheran, but1
it took them about an hour toZ
launch effective operations to
save lives or extract bodies.
Some 200 weeping relatives of
the victims later gathered
around the airport building,
waiting in the snow for news.
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 76
Friday, December 6, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Ullman predicts
tax reform bill

SERIOUS TROUBLE SEEN:

Unemploymen t costing

AP Photo
REPRESENTATIVE AL ULLMAN, acting chairman of the
House Ways and Means Committee, presides over a meeting
of the panel yesterdaytin Washington.tUllman, a Democrat
from Oregon, chaired the meeting in the absence of Wilbur
Mills (D-Ark.) who is in the hospital.
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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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WASHINGTON (IP) - Rep.
Al Ullman, the probable next
chief of the House Ways and
Means Committee, predicted
yesterday that "we're going to
get a tax reform bill next year
and it will be a good one."
.The Oregon Democrat who is
expected to succeed the hos-
pitalized Rep. Wilbur Mills (D-
Ark.) as chairman of the tax-
writing committee, also told re-
porters that news kinds of tax-
es are possible.
Furthermore, he said, "next
year we have to produce a na-
tional health plan."
ULLMAN'S comments came
as Mills remained in Bethesda
Naval Hospital, reportedly un-
der sedation for an undisclosed
illness. He entered the hospi-
tal Tuesday following a week-
end journey to Boston where he
visited stripper Fanne Foxe.
Hospital authorities said Mills
would be allowed no visitors ex-
cept for his wife.
Along with making his first
extensive comments on his
plans, Ullman predicted Con-
gress in the final weeks of this
year will pass the committee-
approved, multibillion - dollar
package of oil tax hikes and
some tax cuts for millions of
average Americans.
"I want to get that behind
us," Ullman said at an inform-
al news conference. "It is a
good bill, it solves a lot of prob-
lems. I think a majority of
the senators would want it en-
acted" if it clears the House
next week, Ullman added.
ASKED IF the bill could sur-
vive a Senate filibuster, Ullman
replied: "My judgment is that
it can be passed."
This would eventually end pe-

troleum producers major tax-
saving depletion allowance, im-
pose a temporary new levy on
windfall profits of oilmen, give
individual Americans who do
not itemize tleir tax returns a
boost in minimum and maxi-
mum standard deductions, and
hike the investment tax credit
for public utilties from 4 per
cent to 7 per cent.
With passage of this, Ullman
said, "then, we've got a tre-
mendous lot of work to do" on
taxes, health and welfare issues.
He indicated a look must be
made at the basic tax system
itself and the ways the govern-
ment raises its revenue.
"THE INCOME tax system
creates some real budgetary
problems. If we're trying to es-
tablish a more stable flow, then
we're going to have to broaden
the tax base," he said, maybe
coming up with something in ad-
dition such as perhaps a value
added tax.
This is a national sales tax
applied at every stage of the
process from raw material to
consumer who ultimately would
pay it. It has been adopted
throughout Western Europe in
one form or another.
"Value-added has been look-
ed at," said Ullman, and "we
wouldn't do it the way Europe
does it, but some Americanized
version is possible."
ON HEALTH insurance, he
said, "I don't believe in payroll
taxes ... but we'd have to find
some other financial mecha-
nism. I think it would be a dis-
aster to dip into general reve-
nues."

millions in

By The Associated Press
Growing lines at unemploy-
ment offices are costing states
millions of extra dollars in bene-
fits for the jobless and some of-
ficials say there could be seri-
ous trouble if the recession
lasts much longer.
An Associated Press survey
showed most states have enough
money in unemployment com-
pensation funds to weather any-
thing but a lengthy, full-scale
depression. But there was con-
cern in some areas where the
money is going out faster than
it is coming in.
"AT THE current rate of
spending, if unemployment
worsens, we expect we could be
in trouble by the spring," said
Mary Hackett, director of
Rhode Island's Department of
Employment Security.
She said the unemployment
compensation fund stood at $22.4
million of as Sept. 30 and added,
"We expect to have $14.7 mil-
lion in the fund at the end of
the year."
Unemployment in Rhode Is-
land during October, the most
recent month for which figures
are available, was 6.7 per cent,
up 1 per cent from October 1973.
THE LABOR Department re-
ported yesterday that 2,436,000
persons received unemployment
benefits for the week ended
Nov. 16, an increase of almost
10 per cent over the previous

week and a jump of 70 per cent
over the same week last year.
The department said the num-
ber of claims increased in every
state except Nevada and Ken-
tucky.
The nationwide unemployment
rate during October was six per
cent, meaning 5.5 million Amer-
icans were without jobs. The No-
vember figure will be released
today and some economists have
predicted unemployment may
rise eight per cent in coming
months.
Many of those classified as
unemployed are not eligible for
benefits - they have not work-
ed before, they obtain new po-
sitions quickly or they left their
jobs voluntarily.
UNEM PLOYMEN T
benefits generally are financed
through a tax on employers
which fluctuates in some areas
according to economic condi-
tions.
An individual who qualifies for
unemployment can draw bene-
fits for up to 26 weeks from
the state fund with additional
money available for 13 weeks
if the jobless rate goes above
a certain per cent or the states
meet certaindother conditions.
The extra funds come half from
the federal government and half
from the states. A proposal
pending in Congress would ex-
tend federal benefits.
Payments, which arefigured
on the basis of previous earn-

ings, generally average about
$50 a week, with a maximum
of $95. Many of the thousands
of laid off auto workers, how-
ever, are getting up to 95 per
cent of their normal salary un-
der a special contract provision
that provides private benefits
in addition to public funds.
ONE OF the most serious
problems appeared to be in
Connecticut where 57,562 per-
sons collected unemployment
compensation in the two weeks
ended Nov. 16, an increase of
60 per cent over the 36,142 per-
sons receiving benefits in the
same period last year.
The average unemployment
payment is $70 a week with a
maximum of $156 weekly - the
highest in the country -- and
the state estimates it paid out
$14 million for November, up
65 per cent from last Novem-
ber's $8.5 million expenditure.
Officials said the State Un-
employment C o m p e n s a-
tion Fund, which had $301 mil-
lion in 1969, now contains be-
tween $28 and $30 million.
The state's unemployment di-
vision already has borrowed
$62 million in interest-free gov-
ernment loans over the past
two years and officials are con-
sidering applying for more mon-
ey. Authorities also are insti-
tuting a new accounting process
Jan. 1 to equalize contributions
from the 66,000 employers who
finance the fund.

benefits

Friday, December 6
Day Calendar
Ctr. South, SE Asian Studies: S.
Hoffman, "Buddhism in America-
The Naropa Institute," 200 Lane
Hall, noon.
Educational Media Ctr.: "Ameri-
can Time Capsule;" "Antonia,"
Schorling Aud., SEB, noon.
Anatomy: J. G. Turcotte, "Trans-
lantation," 4804 Med Sci. II, 3:30
pm.
Philosophy: I. Levi, Columbia U.,
"Truth, Fallibility, & the GrowthI
of Knowledge," Lec. Rm. 2, MLB,
4 pm.
Music School: Collegium Musi-
cum, Christian Reformed Church,
1717 Broadway, 8 pm.
PTP: Dean's "The Sty of the
Blind Pig," Arena Theatre, Frieze
Bldg., 8 pm.
Musket: original musical comedy,
McLaughlin & Ford's "Jericho,"
Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 pm.
FERNANDO ARRABAL
greatest I i v i n q Surrealist
playwright and film direc-
tor,
IN PERSON
WITH HIS FILM

Musical Society: Handel's "Mes-
siah," Hill Aud., 8:30 pm.
Dance: Master Dance Theses,
choreography by S. Martens,
J. Schwartz, Schorling Aud., SEB,
8:30 pm.
General Notices
December 1974 Teacher's Certifi-
cate Candidates: all the require-
ments for the teacher's certificate
must be completed by Dec. 20. The
teacher's oath should be taken in
1225 School of Education as soon
as possible. The Placement material
can be obtained from that office
in the SAB.
Career Planning and Placement
3200 SAB, 764-7460
Job Interviews for Seniors: Sever-
al cities have job conferences to
bring students and employers to-
gether during the Christmas holi-
days. Secific information about con-
ferences in Chicago, Grand Rapids,
Canton, Ohio is now available at
CP&P. Other scheduled conferences
may be held also. Check with CP&P
for late announcements.
Application deadlinesfor Migrant
Service Worker 06 and 07 (State of
Michigan) is Dec. 9. Check with
CP&P for details and applications.
Full tuition scholarships ad fel-
lowships in the fields of biology,
chemistry, math, physics, and eng-
ineering are available at the Insti-
tute of Paper Chemistry, Appleton,
Wisconsin. Details at CP&P.
Interviewing at Career Planning
& Placement: Dec. 9, Golden Gate
Law School; Dec. 10, Cornell Univ.
Grad. Sch. (Minority Schedule).

MICHAEL SHOEMAKER
student of Swami Rudrananda
will speak on Kundalini Yoga
Saturday, December 7,
at 8:00 P.m.
AT
Rudrananda Ashram
640 OXFORD
663-9287

f

SUNDAY, DEC. 8,
7 & 9:30, ANGELL AUD. A
Arrabal will answer guestions
following each screening

Wonen's Fashion Footwear and Handbags
BIG

Z

BOOT

SALE

University Housing Council
Fall Term Elections Dec. 11-20
DURING PRE-REGISTRATION
At Waterman Gym
Candidates may register in SGC Offices-
3909 Mich. Union until 5 p.m., Dec. 6.
Questions? Call Greg Higby, 764-7668

DECEMBER 2-7
All Boots 20% OFF

522
,:A EAST
N WILIAM

I

I

I

ORIG.
PRICE
$70.00
$65.00
$56.00
$45.00

SALE
PRICE
$56.00
$52.00
$45.00
$36.00

I

I

PROJECT JOIN
(Jewish Occupational Interns)
Paid Summer Internships in
Jewish Social Service Agencies
for
Students Enrolled in Baccalaureate
or Master Degree Program.
A joint program of
JEWISH VOCATIONAL SERVICE-COMMUNITY
WORKSHOP AND JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER
Apply now by calling JVS-CW 557-5341
Project JOIN: a communal project sponsored
by the Jewish Community Foundation

BUY NOW and SAVE

500 E. liberty
Ann Arbor
OPEN MONDAY-FRIDAY
'TILL 9
*Mid niteMadnessi,
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6th
7 TO MIDNIGHT
HOLIDAY SALE 13 to off E
BLOUSES, SWEATERS, SLACKS,
COATS, DRESSES, LINGERIE

________

Buy one at
regular price-
get the other
at 1/2 price

Norma Price Ha"tprc.

MW

4'.9',

* - 4. -I

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