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November 26, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-26

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 26, 1974

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, November 26, ~l 974

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'INSENSITIVITY' CITED:
Rocky's role in Attica hit

WASHINGTON (A)-A critic of
Nelson Rockefeller's conduct as
governor of New York charged
Rockefeller with insensitivity to
human life yesterday, focusing
on the Attica prison uprising in
testimony before the House Ju-
diciary Committee.
Rockefeller did not attend the
committee hearing on his nom-
ination to become vice presi-
dent. He was in New York
where his wife, Happy, was un-
dergoing a second cancer opera-
tion.
ROCKEFELLER spent two
days testifying before the com-
mittee last week, and the body
is now hearing from private
groups and individuals, most ofj
them opposed to his nomination.
Arthur Eve, a New York state
assemblyman who tried to have
Rockefeller impeached in 1972,
said Rockefeller's decision to,

let armed police storm Attica, and anarchy.
with a resulting death toll of 43, Eve held Rockefeller respon-
showed an insensitivity to hu- sible for what he said were
man life that should disqualify deliberate lies by state officials
him from becoming vice presi- on the scene, whose reports of
dent. atrocities allegedly committed
Eve was chairman of a group by the prisoners on the hostages4
of 30 outside observers who helped build support for the
tried to negotiate a settlement police attack.

PIRGIM speaker
pushes energy plan
By MARY DEMPSEY "ONE THING you've got to
Public Research Group in consider is the total cost to so-
Michigan (PIRGIM) project di- ciety," he added.
rector Richard Conlin outlined a
proposal to limit excessive resi- PIRGIM'S proposed p r i c e
dential use of electrical power scale would charge 2.4 cents
yesterday in talks at several per kilowatt hour for the first
University classes. 400 hours of electricity, 3.2 cents
UNDER UESTIOING, ve ThePIRGI prosl s d- ortenx ufludlU.

of the 1971 prison takeover. He
said Rockefeller gave the order
for the police attack without
telling the observers.
EVE SAID he thought the
tragedy would havehbeen avert-
ed if Rockefeller had heeded
the request of his own state of-
ficials and come to the prison
town for consultations.
In his testimony last week
Rockefeller said if he had gone
to Attica when prisoners were
holding guards as hostages and
threatening their lives, he would
have been giving in to tyranny

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UNDER QUESTIONING, Eve TePRI proslid-
said the officials might have signed to take the burden of
lied to Rockefeller, too, but high electric costs in the state
added that once Rockefeller off the middle-and low-income
found out they had lied he consumer and penalize those
should have disciplined them, who cause rising costs through
if that were the case.ke wasteful use.
H Ie also charged Rockefeller ACCORDING TO Conlin, resi-
with a lack of sensitivity to the d aC usage o Cenerg , res-
needs of the poor during his dential usage of energy com-
last years as governor. i prises 40 per cent of total con-
He said Rockefeller shifted sumption in the state. Conse-
from a progressive, liberal quently, he said, a reduction in
stance to one of repression after this area could have a large
former President Richard Nix- impact on the state's present
on's election in 1968 in an ap- utility problems.
parent effort to strengthen his Under the PIRGIM plan, con-
standing in the national Re- sumers who used more than 400
publican Party. kilowatt hours per month would
"NIXON AND Rockefeller pay a higher price for the units
worked hand in glove then," he exceeding that level. Although
said, "There is no difference PIRGIM expects the utility
now'between appointing Rocke- companies to oppose the price
feller vice president or appoint- restructuring plan, Conlin
ing Nixon." claimed, "It's going to benefit
-Later, Ada Ryan, president of them as well as anyone else."
a committee of doctors and Conlin predicted the compa-
nurses opposed to abortion, told nies will object because utility
the committee Rockefeller's expansion will not be neces-
veto of a bill repealing New ( sary under PIRGIM's system,
York's legalized abortion law but explained, "We want to try
"has helped bring about the to discourage people from using
destruction of a whole segment excessive amounts of electric-
of our society-the unborn." ity.

for the next 400 hours, ands 3.6
cents for any units exceeding
that amount. Statistics show
that the average consumer uses
457 kilowatt hours per month,
Conlin said.
PIRGIM believes the theory
that "increased usage lowers
costs" no longer holds, Conlin
said, and in order to avoid a
long term crisis there must be
a cutback in use of electricity.
HE CITED six current prob-
lems which he claimed would
be resolved by PIRGIM's "dis-
incentive" system:
-continually increasinlg elec-
tric utility use;
-consumption of limited na-
tural resources;
-damage to the environment
caused by energy production;
-rising capital expense caus-
ed by expansion of the utility
system;
-increasing production costs;
and
-rising energy costs to indi-
viduals whose usage remains
stable.

ST EVE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
Home Cooking Is Our Specialty

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71

Breakfast All Day
3 eggs, Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.05

I

DOES AN
0 0
OFFERS YOU THE CHANCE TO:
* Work with customers and assisting them in their
advertisements.
* Experience in ad layout and proof reading.
* Work with full classified ad department: con-
tracts and short term insertions.
* Deal w i t h national advertisers, advertising
agencies and national representatives.
Whatever interests you,
THE DAILY can use your talents
420 MAYNARD

Ham or Bacon or
Sausage with 3 eggs,
Hash Browns, Toast and
jelly-$1 .50
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak,
Hash Browns,
Toast & Jelly-$1.90

Specials This Week
Beef Stroganoff
Chinese Pepper Steak
Home-made Beef Stew
Eva Rolls
Home-made Soups (Beef,
Barlev Clam Chowder, etc.)
Chil, Veqetable Tempura
(served after 2 p.m.)
Hamburger Steak Dinner-
( t/2 Ib.) . . $1s.79
Spaqhetti in Wine Sauce
Beef Curry Rice

FAS
S~an v l,

T AND FRIENDLY SERVICE BY MR. AND MRS. LEE

-I-Ini

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SUN. 9-8
CLOSED MON.
TUES.-.SAT. 8-8
769-2288
1313 SO UNIVERSITY
STEVE'S LUNCH

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UNIVERSITY THEATRE PROGRAMS
PRESENTS
in the POWER CENTER
November 27-30
William
Shakespeare's
featuring
NICHOLAS
PENNELLs
Guest Artist'
in Residence;
Mr. Pennell will repeat his role of the
past two seasons with the Stratford
Festival Theatre of Canada.
Ticket information available at Mendels-
sohn Theatre Building, Mendelssohn ticket
office, phone: (313) 764-0450

WASHINGTON (A) - Region-'
al leaders of the United Mine
Workers ( U M W ) were sum-
moned from the coal fields yes-
terday for a crucial vote on an
improved contract- offer that
could speed an end to the min-
ers' strike, now two weeks old.
The new contract package,
containing a fatter wage of-
fer from the coal operators, will
be submitted today to the UM-
W's 38-member bargaining coun-
cil.
APPROVAL by the council,
which balked at the last offer,
is needed before the pact can
be put to a ratification vote by
the union's 120,000 striking
members. In the meantime, U-
MW officials said the eight-to-

10-day ratification process may
be shortened so the mines can
be reopened early next month,
provided the contract wins ac-
centa nce.
Union officials did not want
details of the new package
made public until after the bar-
gaining council had a chance
to ex;mine.
However, sorces said it
pro-vides a 10 per cent wage
increase the first year, four
per cent more in the second
vear and threerper cent in the
final year. There's no change
in the cost-of-living formula
guaranteeing a one-cent-an-hour
increase for every 0.4 per cent
boost in the government's Con-
sumer Price Index.

council votes today

IOUSE 0
218 N. DIVISION 665-0606
"On the Trail of Benedict Arnold"
TUESDAY EVENING HOUR-8 P.M.
-the most extraordinary military compoian of the 18th
century retraced by six U of M explorers.

THE OTHER major sticking
point involved the splitting of
the triditional two-week sum-
mer vacation period. Instead of
being requiring one week of va-
cation in the summer and the
other at Christmas as called for
in the original contract propos-
al, the revised agreement re-
tains the back-to-back vacation
schedule.
"The package is larger than
in the original agreement," said
one union source. "We did not
give anything away."
Theoriginal agreement an-
nounced Nov. 13 contained wage
and benefit increase totaling
about 50 per cent over three
years, including a 15 per cent
wage hike. But the bargaining
council refused to accept it and
last week instructed UMW
President Arnold Miller to seek
improvement in five areas, in-
cluding wages and vacations.
Hairstyling for
the Whole Family
Appointments Available
DASCOLA BARBER-
STYLISTS
Arborland-971-9975
Maple Villqe-761-2733
E. Liberty-668-9329
E. University-662-0354

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The Glenmary Home Missioners are looking'for
men and women who believe in people. Share,
yourself with the people of the South and Ap -
palachia as a Priest, Brother or Sister.
Send free 17" x 22" poster, shown above
Please send information about Glenmary Home Missioners
GLENMARY. Room #

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