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November 23, 1974 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-23

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Saturday, November 23, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

Saturday, November 23, 1974

6

H MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Ford will continue
South Korean aid

I

SEOUL, South Korea (1P) -
President Ford gave assurances
yesterday that the United
States would maintain its 38,000
man troop strength in South Ko-
rea and, if Congress goes along,
spend up to $500 million mod-
ernizing the Korean armed
forces.
In a two-hour session with
President Chung Hee Park,
Ford also discussed South Ko-
rea 's repressive domestic poli-
cies which have raised concern
in the Congress and brought
criticism of Park.
OFFICIALS refused to say
what was discussed between the
two presidents, saying only that
the principle concern of the
U.S. is the peace and stability
Iof the area.
But in an apparent effort to
ease some of the criticism over
the visit, it was announced that
Richard Smyser, a member of
the National Security Council,
would stay in Seoul after Ford's
departure to hear complaints
from five representatives of dis-
sident religious groups.
D i s s i d e n t s demonstra-

cussing other international
problems.
The president began his visit
to Korea riding through streets
lined by some one million flag-
waving welcomers. Ford stop-
ped at the national cemetery to
lay wreaths at the tomb of
Park's slain wife and at a mon-
ument for the nation's military
dead.
The president's wife was
killed on Aug. 15 during an as-
sassination attempt on Park's
life.
LATER IN talking with Park,'
the president raised the possi-
bility of eventual U. S. recogni-
tion of North Korea, provided
China and theaSoviet Union deal
with Seoul in a like manner.
Since the Korean War, in
which 35,000 Americans died,
Seoul has received $11 billion in
U.S. aid. Ford called South
Korea a "faithful ally" and said
"nothing binds nations closer
than to have fought side by
side."
SECRETARY of State Henry
Kissinger, referring to allega-
tions of repression under Park's
one-man rule, acknowledged to
newsmen that "some nega-
tives" were involved in the visit
to Korea.
But he said the United States
could use its influence to bring
about domestic political chan-
ges "only to a very limited le-
gree" and that security in the
Pacific remained the chief
concern.

L

ATTENTION
A DVERTISERS!I

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a
r l
3

In the event the Maize and Blue emerges victori-
ous over the notorious B--keyes (and is there any
doubt of that?), the Display Advertising Depart-

ment of The

Michigan Daily will be-open from

III

1 p.m.-5 p.m. Sunday afternoon,

Nov. 24 and the

Deadline for Display Ads for the issue of Tuesday,
Nov. 26 will be extended to Monday at noon.

I l

FA

f!

AP Photo
THIS VICTIM is aided in an ambulance Thur sday night following the bombing of two bars
in Birmingham, England. Casualties include 120 injured and 19 dead. Many Britons are blam-
ing the blasts on the Irish Republican Army.
1 9 killed, 120 injured s
IRA bombs British bars

ting against the Park govern-
ment in recent weeks had ex-
pressed fear that Ford's visit
would strengthen Park's posi-
tion.
FORD ENDS his 23-hour visit
to Korea early today and flies
on to a summit meeting with
Soviet leader Leonid Brezhnev
near the Soviet far eastern port
city of Vladivostock. He and
Brezhnev will spend the week-
end trying to find the path to
a 10-year treaty limiting offen-
sive nuclear weapons and dis-

NO TICE
THE 1974-75

BIRMINGHAM, E n g l a n d
(Reuter) - Britain's second
largest city was shocked and
bitterly angry yesterday over
the deaths of 19 young people
and the horrifying injuries caus-
ed by an Irish guerrilla bomb
attack Thursday night.
A doctor said the injuries
seemed to indicate use of a new
type of bomb which coused not
only multiple wounds but se-
vere flash burns to the face,
hands and hair because of a
very high temperature.
DR. JAMES Inglis, chairman
of Birmingham's medical exec-
utive, said the first batch of in-
jured to arrive at the city's
general hospital were unrecog-
nizable because of burns. He
thought the effects were prob-
ably more severe than napalm.
"It was the worst disaster I
have seen since the war," stat-
ed Dr. John Fulford. "Hanging
Pentagon cu
eliminate 11
WASHINGTON (P) - The
Pentagon unwrapped a new
package of military base reduc-
tions and consolidations yester-
day, and a top official indicated
more can be expected.
"I think you can expect there
will be future packages," As-
sistant Secretary of Defense
Arthur Mendolia told report-
ers. He did not say when.
THE NEW actions, affecting
111 depots, laboratories, air
bases and other facilities in 40
states and Puerto Rico, will re-
sult in elimination of 11,600 ci-
vilian jobs and transfer of 11,-
500 military personnel to com-
bat or combat-related assign-
ments.
After the changes are com-
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 69
Saturday, November 23, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i I y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);,
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
$2.50 8V31
FRI.-SAT.
Columbia Record's
Diane Marcovitz I

i

should never have been abolish- nection with the bombings.
ed and I hope the people who Charges were believed likely to-
voted against it (in Parlia- morrow.
ment) will change their minds The five people being detained
now.". by the police were picked up
The sudden explosions among last night as they were about to
unsuspectingsdrinkers ripped board a ferry to Belfas rabout
arms and legs off bodiesmand thre obrs fterthe fb.
shreded fesh.Itambombs went off.

STUDENT DIRECTORY,

WILL GO ON SALE

MICHAEL WILLS, 18, said
that he was just to about to play
the jukebox in the tavern in the
town when there was a huge
flash of light in the underground
bar.
"I saw people with their
clothes ripped off and I saw
people with their arms and legs"
cut off," he said.
Members of Parliament de-
manded a return of the death
penalty, and anti-Irish demon-
strations broke out at factories!
in the English midlands.
A WOMAN and four men
were in custody tonight in con-
ibacks to
,0 jobs
pleted over the next 2/2 years,
73 of the installations will have
lost civilian and military jobs,E
while 35 others will gain.
Rather than claiming that the
base shuffling will save money,
as was done in past cutbacks,
the Pentagon forecast that $3.3
billion will be translated from
support and overhead functions
to more combat power over a"
span of 10 years.
"WE HAVE got excess ca-
pacity in support facilities,"
Mendolia said.
"As you try to stretch the
dollar, you try to squeeze out
overhead costs.'
Mendolia said the Pentagon
took into account the depressed
state of the U.S. economy ins
deciding on the new round of:
base reductions and consolida-
tions.

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Home Secretary Roy Jenkins
brushed aside appeals to bring
back hanging. But he promised
rigorous legislation next week
to help crack down on the Irish
Republican Army (I.R.A.) and
its intensified new drive aided
at pushing Britain out of Nor-
thern Ireland.
POLITICAL sources said theM
measures may include curbs on
traditional civil liberties in'
Britain.

STARTING

Day Calendare
Saturday, November 23
WUOM: From the Midway, "God's
Country, Las Vegas, and the Gun-f
fighter," with John 0. Cawelti, 1
U. of Chicago, 10 'am.
Friends of 'Matthaei Botanicalr
Gardens: Benefit sale, 1800 Dixboro.
Rd., 10 am-4:30 pm.
!Football: U-M vs. Ohio State,!
WUOM, 91.7 MHz, broadcast 12:15I
pm.
Music School: Vicki Kuhn, so-
prano, Recital Hall, 4:30 pm.

ences, or eng. at Brookhaven Na-
tional Lab., Upton, L.I., N.Y. 11973;
Edeadline: Jan. 31. MS in Labor Stu-
dies, U-Mass; financial aid avail-
able; write Prof. Harvey Friedman,
Draper Hall, U. of Mass., Amherst,
Ma 01002.
A-V Ctr.: Christo's Valley Cur-
tain; Monument to the Dream,
Pendleton Ctr., 2nd Fir., Union, 8
pm.
Music School: Contemporary Mu-
sic Festival: 100th Birthday Concert,
Arnold Schoenberg, Hill Aud., 8 pm.

Wednesday, Nov. 27

A

L

-----------

There were signs of an anti-; YHockey:v U M vs. Mich. Tech.,
Irish backlash by the British Yost Ice Arena, 7:30 pm.
public. In Birmingham an Irish Romance Lang., Lit.: Georges
Poisson, "L'architecture Moderne
communty leader, Dermot en France," 627 Oxford Rd., 8 pm.
O'Riordan, said Irish car fac- Music School: Humperdincks op-
tory workers had been assaulted era, "Hansel and Gretel," Mendels-
at their factories during the Sohn, 8 pm; Ann Patterson, piano,
day. "The reports are most Recital Hall, 8 pm.
d TCareer Planning & Placement
alarming," O'Riordan said. 3200 SAB, 764-7456
Already two firebombs have Case Western Reserve U./Law will
benthrown at Catholic chur- visit srs. interested in attending Law,
bee t w trSch., Mon., Nov. 25; phone 4-7456
ches. for visit. Nat'l Science Foundation1
AN IRISH taxi driver said: Fellowships for grad students ina
biol., physical, social, engr., med..
"Things will be bad for us here & math Sciences; deadline: Dec. 2;
now. I went into a shop to buy apply Fellowship Of., Nat'l Research
a newspaper this morning and Council, 2101 Constitution Ave., N.
the irlrefsedto erv mew.,wash. DC 20418. Summer Jobs
the girl refused to serve me for Jrs. & Srs. interested in re-
when she heard my accent." search in physical, math, life sci-
IT
U of M YS. OSU
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Double Drinks
2 giant color TV's
BRING A GROUP
The Huron Hotel and Lounge
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