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November 20, 1974 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-20

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Wednesday, November 20, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

e. -

I!

rw.-2/he Sandujihc J/.,1aih
'Orr's hopes dampened..
.. , awaits vote on transfer
John Kahler -
THERE HAS BEEN much talk in recent days about how
last year's Rose Bowl vote was a great injustice to Bo
Schembechler and the Michigan football team. But Bo should not
feel that he is the only person ever given the shaft by the Big
Ten. In a few days he will have company.
Johnny Orr and the Michigan basketball team face a vote
by three Big Ten faculty representatives this Thursday on the
eligibility of 6-10 center Tom Bergen. Barring an unexpected turn
of events, Orr will lose the vote.
There is a long and bizarre story behind Tom Bergen's
presence at this university. Last year, as a freshman, Bergen
was a backup center for the University of Utah, and played in
18 of that team's 26 games. The native of Mt. Prospect, Ill.
was expected to step in as the starting center this year, fol-
lowing Mike Sojourner's decision to turn pro.
But the NCAA thought otherwise. It seems that Bergen's high
school physical education grades were added onto his cumulative
gradepoint on his transcript, in violation of his high school's rules.
Without the phys ed grades, Bergen would have been a non-
predictor (could not "predict" from his high school gradepoint
that his college grades would be "C" or above) and hence
ineligible to play as a freshman.
In punishment, the NCAA ruled that Bergen could not play
for Utah this year. But since he had done nothing wrong himself,
the NCAA ruled that Bergen could play this year for any other
school in the country.
Bergen sneaks in
Johnny Orr found out about Tom Bergen a few weeks
after fall classes started, and reacted as though the young
lad had fallen from heaven. Orr convinced Bergen that he
could make up the missed weeks of classes, and slipped him
past admissions.
Then the troubles began. The NCAA had to rule that Bergen
was eligible to play at Michigan. This they did, but it was Oct. 25
before the ruling came down.
And the Big Ten has its own rules in matters like this.
Transfers into Big Ten schools must sit out a year regardless of
the situation that made them transfer. (The only exceptions
occur when athletes transfer from a school that has dropped a
sport.)
Why, then, should Michigan hope to get special treatment?
"I have never heard of a situation like this before," claims
Orr, And, indeed, the NCAA's action in this case is utterly
unprecedented.
Michigan must petition the Big Ten faculty representatives
to waive the transfer eligibility rule in Bergen's case. A com-
mittee of four faculty reps (since reduced to three) will decide
on the petition.
Big Ten to foil again
There is a reason why no one is expecting a favorable vote.
That reason is the composition of the committee of three. Faculty
representatives from Iowa, Michigan State and Ohio State will
decide Bergen's fate, and the latter two schools have been known
to carry grudges against Michigan.
If that wasn't enough, it appears that the Big Ten is adding
injury to insult. The decision was supposed to come last Friday,
but was postponed.
"We've had all sorts of problems getting together," says
Marcus Plant, Michigan's faculty rep, who is presenting the
petition. "One of the representatives was in the hospital, and
we couldn't arrange the phone hookup."
So now the decision is expected Thursday, eight days before
the basketball season is scheduled to begin. That does not give
Orr much time to work Bergen into his team plans.
Vote comes tomorrow
There is no question that Bergen could help the basketball
team. At 180 pounds, he is rather skinny, and Orr would play
him in the pivot only with reluctance. But in practice, he has
shown that he can handle himself at forward.
He does not harm the team's speed and defense when in the
lineup, and his effective hook shot should prove to be a crowd
pleaser among the Crisler Arena faithful.
"It's not as though he would be the difference between us

and a national championship," says Orr. "But we would like to
have him this year."
Neither Tom Bergen nor Johnny Orr have ever done anything
to harm the Big Ten. Simple justice would grant Bergen the right
to play this year.
But then, the same principle would have sent the Michigan
football team to Pasadena last year.

Buck(
By JON CHAVEZ1
Television football "experts"
never tire of flaunting their
knowledge by pointing out that,
"In this game, the best offense
is a good defense."
. Ohio State, a fountainhead of
cliches in its own right, tried
to change the hallowed idea to
"the best offense, is all you
really need." And it worked
for awhile, as its offense scored
41 points a game and - gave
plenty of playing time to the
fifth string.
HOWEVER, PAT formulas
don't work all the time,as any-
one who was present at Spar-
tan Stadium on November 9 will
attest. It became painfully ob-
vious that day that, while
Woody had built something re-
sembling the ultimate offense,
somebody let his defenders
slip.
Last year's Buckeye defense
gave up an average 207 yards
I 00PS*
Yesterday in Roger Ros-
siter's column, Bo Schem-
bechler was quoted as say-
ing, "I'm looking forward to
this coming to a vote." The
quote should have read, "I'm
not looking forward to this
coming to a vote."
of total offense a game. This
year, through eight conference
contests, it has allowed the op-
position 310 yards each outing.
That doesn't exactly thrill the
Columbus faithful.
What's the major difference
between those two units?
Last year's starting trio of
linebackers graduated, and
Woody tried to replace them
with Bruce Elia, Arnie Jones
The Top 20
By The Associated Press

eye
spe

defense

hurt

h

liebacking

####%%20%#

Daily,
Sports
NIGHT EDITORS.
RAY O'HARA
MARCIA MERKER
and Ken Thompson. Otherwise,
it's the same team.
ELIA, CONVERTED from
fullback, leads the team with 60
solo tackles. Jones, who has
also played some time at de-
fensive tackle, comes right be-
hind Elia with 39. Converted
quarterback Thompson, a soph-
omore,has done little to dis-
tinguish himself..
"These three kids aren't as
good as last year's," claims
MSU head coach Denny Stolz.
"Michigan will have success
running inside."
"The question is," Stolz con-
tinued, "will Ohio State allow
Dennis Franklin to run the op-
tion?" Unless their linebackers
improve, the Buckeyes just
might.
Cal Stoll, whose Minnesota
Gophers scored 19 points and
ran for 232 yards against the
Bucks, also felt Michigan could
run successfully against Ohio
State.
THE BUCKEYE DEFENSE
has "no apparent weaknesses,"
said Stoll, an acknowledged ex-
pert in that area. He also called
the Buckeyes "a better offen-
sive team than defensive," even
though OSU ran up only 33
points against his squad.
The line is the strongest part
of the Buckeye defense. Pete
Cusick and Nick Buonamici
are both strong tackles who will
give their Wolverine counter-
parts plenty of trouble.
All-American Van DeCree and
running mate Jim Cope protect
the flanks, and will concentrate
on creaming Dennis Franklin
should the Michigan quarter-
back decide to keep the ball on
the option play. It was DeCree
who sent Franklin to the bench
last year 'vth a vicious thunk
to the collarbone.

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U a

Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
OSU'S DEFENSIVE END Jim Cope (91) and tackle Pete
Cusick (71) converge on Wolverine Chuck Heater in last
year's 10-10 tie in Ann Arbor. The Buckeye defensive line
is touted as the bulwark of their defense.

1. Oklahoma 45
2. Alabama 9
3. MICHIGAN 8
tie DAILY LIBELS
4. Ohio State
5. Notre Dame
6. Nebraska
7. Auburn
8. So. California
9. Texas A&M
10. Penn St.
11. Maryland
12. Miami, O.
13. N. C. St.
14. Michigan St.
15. Houston
16. Baylor
17. Texas
18. Pitt
19. California
20. Florida

9-0-0
10-0-0
10-0-0
10-0-0
9-1-0
8-1-0
8-2-0
9-1-0
7-1-1
8-2-0
8-2-0
7-3-0
9-0-1
9-2-0
6-3-1
7-2-0
6-3-0
7-3-0
7-3-0
7-2-1
7-3-0

1,198
1,078
-1,040
1,040

874 Described by press releases
639{
630 as anything from "physically
560 powerful" to "exceptionally
542 quick," this line has allowed
35its Big Ten foes to run for a
311 mediocre 3.7 yardstper carry.
227
187 BUCK OPPONENTS have had
168 better luck testing the OSU sec-
113 ondary, As Charlie -Baggett
105 proved several times, Ohio
63 State is vulnerable against the
50 bomb, even when the touted
42 Neil Colzie isn't on the bench.

r
T
f
i

you're way ahead," Stolz re-
minded.
Attempting to stop Jim Smith,
Gil Chapman et al will be Col-
zie, who's swiped five tosses
this year, and an obscure crew
consisting of Steve Luke, Doug
Plank and Tim Fox, each of
whom have intercepted thrice.
Colzie also returns the punts,
and might be the best in the
country at this specialty. Dave
Brown he quite definitely is not.
IN ALL, THE Buckeyes have
given up 101 points - 58 more
than last year-and do not have
a shutout to their credit. Co-
lumbus football freaks, who
well remember how two bril-
liant goal-line stands saved the
Michigan game for them two
years ago, have reason to wor-
ry.
Should worst come to worst,
though, Woody can rely on his
fabled "twelfth man," - the
Stadium itself. Buckeye foes
traditionally have to break the
plane of a line two yards deep
in the endzone before the offic-
ials will risk instant death and
signal the touchdown. It hap-
pened to Harry Banks in 1972,
and it could easily happen;
again.

SCORES
NBA
New York 86, Washington 85
Buffalo 110, Golden State 106
Atlanta 122, Seattle 113
Milwaukee 122, Phoenix 108
K-C Omaha 97, Detroit 87
NHL
NY Islanders4, Pittsburgh 3
Washington 6, California 4
Cycleskack
The Unique Bike Bag

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By The UPI
Alabama 23 10-0
MICHIGAN 12 10-0
tie DAILY LIBELS 10-0
Ohio St. 9-1
Notre Dame 9-1
Nebraska 8-2
Auburn 9-1
Southern Cal 7-1-1
Texas A&M 8-2
Penn St. 8-2
N.C. St. 9-2
Maryland 7-3
Miami O. 9-0-1
Houston 8-2
Texas 7-3
Pittsburgh 7-3
Baylor 6-3
Mich. St. 5-3-1
tie UCLA 6-2-2
tie Tulsa 7-3
San Diego St. 7-2

6 Facing panic - stricken of-
fenses, Ohio State's defensive
335 backs have cobbed a mislead-
321 ing 19 interceptions. "It's easy
321 to play pass defense when
266
204
188
186
173
87
52
30 His faithless troops quiver
25 mad fatman ("or fat madm
18 Schenkel), turned toward' the
1 was here. Calling to his first-b
he commanded, "Get these pic
6 day and I'll win a free pizza. Beg
2 1. MICHIGAN at Ohio State
2 (pick score)
2 2. Indiana at Purdue
1 3. Northwestern at Illinois

That Becomes An
Instant Shoulder Bag

Coach es
By JEFF SCHILLER of several
Everyone turns football expert this Iowa's B
week. Even Michigan fans who think gave Mic
Archie Griffin plays quarterback are
devising a strategy for Bo. The people BUT T
who should know, the coaches of the weak. Th
teams who have played against one or unit as "I
both squads this season tend to favor out that
Michigan. Their comments offer valu- same ass
able insights into the likely game plans "Ohio S
that the respective coaches will employ, he expla
Michigan State's Denny Stoltz and them. Wf
Southern Methodist's Dave Smith share maneuver
a common opinion: OSU's linebackers them. Bt
are vulnerable. where yo
get across
"THEIR (OSU's) weakness is in the Then th
middle defensively-that is, at the line- matchup-
backing position," Smith commented. Maize anc
And Stoltz suggested a specific set of
tactics for exploiting the sore spot. "OHIO
"Michigan will move the ball on Ohio team," S
State," the Spartan mentor said. "They'll there's an

rate
[ coaches, Minnesota's Cal Stoll,
ob Commings and Stoltz who
higan the edge defensively.
HE OSU defense is far from
e coaches rank the rest of the
highly skilled" and Stoll pointed
moving the football is not the
scoring.
State has a 'reading defense',"
ined. "They let you come at
'hen there's a lot of room to
r, you can move the ball against
ut down near the goal line
u're more limited, it's hard to
s."
he coaches turned to the other
-OSU's offense versus the
A Blue defense.
STATE HAS a great offensive
toltz claimed. "I don't think
nything they've done all season

game'
when to employ it, they don't pass well."
Now all Bo must do is devise a way
to stop Archie on the first two downs.
Stoll thought Michigan might be able
to force some turnovers.
"MICHIGAN'S DEFENSE is more ag-
gressive than Ohio State's," he declared.
"They keep coming at you. They create
the big play when they need it."
Blackman sounded a word of warning,
however.
"In addition to all of OSU's other
weapons, the major problem with de-
fensing Ohio State is Greene's improvis-
ing. When he runs back against the flow
on a broken play, he's very dangerous."
THE COACHES SPEAK of four other
factors as being important, though there
is disagreement as to how crucial one
of these, the home field advantage,
actually is. All feel, however, that in-
juries, in particular . the condition of

Piceks
ing over a nameful dread,, the
ian, who knows?" cried Keith
flattening wind. The Revenge
orn and handing him the scroll
ks to the Daily by midnight Fri-
gone."
4. Iowa at Mich. State
5. Minnesota at Wisconsin
6. Mississippi at Mississippi St.
7. Oregon at Oregon St.
8. Wash. at Wash. St.
9. USC at UCLA
10. Penn St. at Pitt.
11. Tulane at LSU
12. . Carolina at Clemson
13. Stanford at California
14. Baylor at SMU
15. La. Tech at N.E. Louisiana
16. Oklahoma at Nebraska
17. Kentucky at Tennessee
18. Yale at Harvard
19. Furman at Wake Forest
20. DAILY LIBELS at Ohio
State Lantern
Billboard
Basketball season tickets
will go on sale today from
8:30 am-12:30pm for students
whose ID cards have 1, 0, 9, or
8 to the right of their names,
and from 12:30-4:30 pm for
juniors with 2 to the right of
their names. Tomorrow, soph-
omore tickets (1D-3) will be on
sale at 8:30 am, and freshman
tickets (ID-4) will go at 12:30
pm.

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Original%- s
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and hollered out, "Gold. There's Gold in the river:'
Carole thought he was telling her that it was cold
in the river. She jumped to shore, and threw some
yellow rocks at him. The prospector had them as-
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gold" (which is worth even less than "fool's gold").
The prospector died penniless, while Carole went
on to the commercial below.
Burgie Beer: Burgie is original California Beer.
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"12 fluid ounces" (Sure, other beers may say that,
but do they really mean it?) Try some Burgie beer.
No other product can make that statement.
Burgie
Original California Beer

ISK I ( I R hR MTI*J

I

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