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November 19, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-19

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MMMNMMP

Page Eight
tit EXHIBITION and SALE ofG
Original Oriental Art
& An outstanding selection of antique oriental
woodblock prints plus original etchings, wood-
cuts, lithographs by contemporary oriental print- (G
makers.
U ion Gallery 1st floor Michigan Union
November 18 & 19-10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 4
Arranged by'
Marson Lid., Baltimore, Maryland 21208
(Purchases May Be Charged)
Centicore Bookshops,
is pleased to
010 INVITE EVERYONE
010 -T O A
RECEPTION & AUTOGRAPH PARTY Ii
In Honor of the Publication
of the Revised Edition of
RUDOLF ARNHEIM'S
} ART & VISUAL PERCEPTION
A Psychology of the Creative Eye
Since its first publication in 1954, this work has established itself as a
uniaue classic. Now Arnheim has thoroughly revised and enlarged the text
Of and added new illustrations, taking advantage of recent developments in
his own work and that of others.
"It is a book of first-rate importance, and many aspects of the psychology !
b of art are for the first time given a scientific basis. It is sure to have a
far-reaching influence."-Sir Herbert Read.
RUDOLF ARNHEIM WILL BE AT CENTICORE THURSDAY, NOV. 21 at
12:15 to 1:15 TO MEET HIS ADMIRERS AND AUTOGRAPH COPIES OF
HIS BOOKS
CENTICORE BOOKS HOPS
336 MAYNARDp

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, November 19, 1974

FBI report released

(Continued from Page 1)
suade him to authorize such
acts. "I can't forsee such a
situation today," he replied.
BUT WHILE Saxbe was em-
phasizing that counterintelli-
gence tactics against domestic
groups have come to an end,
Kelley was defending the pro-
gram and suggesting the need
for legislation to authorize
similar tactics in future emer-
gency situations.
Kelley made his strongest de-
fense in a five-page statement
distributed following the press
conference when reporters had
no opportunity to question him
about it.
"Efforts admittedly were
made to disrupt the anarchis-
tic plans and activities of vio-
lence - prone groups whose
publicly announced goal was to
bring America to its knees," the
Kelley statement said. "For the
FBI to have done less under the
circumstances would have been
an abdication of its responsi-
bilities to the American people."
THE OTHER groups targeted
for disruptive tactics, including
some organizations with no re-
cord of violence through most,

if not all, of their history, were
the Southern Christian Leader-
ship Conference, the Congress
on Racial Equality, and the
Student Non-Violent Coordinat-
ing Committee were among the
target of a counter-intelligence
program against "black extrem-
ists" from August 1967 to Ap-
ril 1971.
The three organizations were
considered relatively moderate
in the black civil rights move-
ment through at least most of
their existence.
The Black Panthers, the Na-
tion of Islam and the Revolu-
tionary Action Movement were
the other targets of the "black
extremist" operation.
A CAMPAIGN against the
New Left from May 1968 to
April 1971 was focused on the
Weathermen, Students for a
Democratic Society, the Pro-
gressive Labor Party and the
Young Socialist Alliance. The
targets of an operation against
"white hate groups" from 1964
to 1971 were the Ku Klux Klan,
Minutement, American Nazi
Party, and National States
Rights Party.

SGC budget: Open finances
to boost. sagging public image

By TIM SCHICK
Student Government Council
(SGC) is attempting to change
its image and win the confi-
dence of the student body by
publicizing an itemization of
their budget this year.
Their total allocation, $53,046,
is derived from a 75 cent as-
sessment from each students
tuition bill, a low cost student
health insurance plan, and a
low cost student travel plan.
Automatically, $33,895 is shel-
led out for monetary obliga-
tions: $14,900 to legal advocate
program, $8423 to last years
debts, and $10,572 for the oper-
ation of student government,
including staff salaries, phone
bills, stationery, and office
equipment.
THE remaining $24,387 will
be allocated wherever SGC
deems appropriate, and 'this
year four items top the list-
elections, advertising and pub-
lic relations, and social events
and projects.
Despite recent fiascos, SGC
has allocated $4800 to cover the
costs of October's election and
the coming spring election, a
much lower cost than past SGC
elections, some of which have
come to a whopping bill of $10,-
000.
The second large appropria-
tion, $3000, is intended for ad-
vertising and public relations,
aimed at increasing student in-
terest in SGC, since only 3.5
per cent of the students voted
in the last election.
However, Campus Coalition,
a SGC faction, has attacked the
advertising appropriation. They
favor cutting it to $2000, and al-
locating the remaining to aca-
demic and community pro-
grams.
THE NEXT $6000 will be di-
vided between social events
and projects, and minority pro-
grams requesting financial aid.
Community programs and
Academic programs will re-
ceive $210 and $300 respectively,

while women's organizations'
and child care services are in
a class of their own with $1200
from the SGC budget.
The Student Health Insurance'
program will need $900 to cover
operation expenses; $350 will
cover the Central Student Ju-'
diciary costs, and $250 goes to
t h e Student Organizations
Gov't repo
dope as
(Continued from Page 1)
speculativesince theytinvolved,
for the most part, studies on
animals and tissue in test tubes.
Dr. Robert DuPont, the in-
stitute's director who admitted
trying marijuana "a number
of years ago," said the pre-
liminary findings give "cause
for concern and caution."
"For now it would seem the
possible adverse effects should
lead marijuana smokers or po-
tential smokers to question
whether it is worth the risk,"
he said.
DuPONT, who is also director
of the White House Special Ac-
tion Office for Drug Abuse Pre-
vention, said that if he had
known as a younger man what
the latest report disclosed, "I
think it might very well have
deterred me" from marijuana
experimentation.
Marijuana, the 38-year-old,
1963 Harvard Medical School
graduate said, "is dangerous
and I am prepared to so certify.
I am prepared to say that it's
a hazard to health."
In a speech to the National
Organization for'the Reform of
Marijuana Laws last weekend,
DuPont criticized stiff penalties
for marijuana users but stopped
short of calling for decriminal-
ization.

Board.
$1241 will be put into a fund
marked grants and gifts, which
will be allocated to groups con-
sidered worthy by SGC.
The remaining $900 will pay
for miscellaneous expenses in
the administration of. SGC,
which some council members
have termed a "slush fund."
"
rt cites
tngerous
THE report he releasedcited
these new research findings but
cautioned that implications for
humans were "purely specula-
tive."
-Animal studies indicated
that marijuana's active ingre-
dient, delta-9-TCH, has a "po-
tentially harmful effect" on
fundamental cell metabolism
and may interfere with the
body's ability to resist diseases.
-THC delays rejection of skin
grafts in rats, suggesting pos-
sible value in organ transplant
srgerv, and inhibits the growth
of solid tumors in mice and
thus may prove useful in treat-
ing human tumors.
-Marijuana smoke adminis-
tered to human lung tissue in
a test tube changes the basic
chemistry of cell life, cell di-
vision and growth.
One new study involving 20
young chronic marijuana smok-
ers showed that levels of the
male hormone testosterone were
lowered temporarily. Six had
reduced sperm counts, although
levels remained within the
normal range, and two were
impotent.
The hormone levels returned
to original levels after mari-
juana smoking was stopped.
Two other studies produced in-
consistent results; one found
reduced serum testosterone and
the other did not.

I

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WOMEN IN LAW

I1

Sponsored by
CARFFR

The third in a series of informal lunch hour discussions.
Representatives from Yale Law School, DePaul University
College of Law, and the Institute for Paralegal Training
will discuss opportunities in the legal profession.
ALL WOMEN WELCOME - Freshpeople - Seniors,
Grad. students, faculty and staff. Feel free to bring
your lunch.
WEDNESDAY-NOV. 20-12 NOON
Held in Conference Rooms 4 & 5,
MICHIGAN. LEAGUE

0

Planning t
Placement
764-7460

THERE'S A NEW RULE OFTHUMB
FOR WEEKENDS.AND HOLIDAYS.

lI

WOLFSCHMIPT 5CHMILE333-ThE SHIK

AMTRAK. /%%
Insteadof standing on a highway, catching On cross-country trips, you can stop off along
the breeze as the cars pass you by at 55 mph, the way anywhere you like. Then
you could be catching our cat Amtrak may not / board another train later with
be as cheap as hitching. But for the little ' the same ticket.
money you spend, you get a lot more in return. But for the time you're with us,
Nowhere else but on an Amtrak train do you'll find the Amtrak train
you get so much room along the way. ' -.-a whole different trip. Because
We give you the biggest seat in travel.With - we not only get you to where
more space around it, too. you're going, we take you away from
From our picture windows, we give you ;w . . the problems of air pollution,
the kind of close-up view of America you energy crisis and inflation. Maybe
can't get from highways and cloudbanks. that's why on trains people act more
You can get a different point of view, like friends than strangers.
too, from the people you meet On your next trip, come together with
on the train. Since there are no seat belts your friends on Amtrak.
to hold you back on Amtrak, x
you can roam the train from car to catp- Amtrak
Maybe grab something to drink
at the snack bar or lounge car. And - - .Save America's Energy. Save Your Energy.
the prices are reasonable, too. Ride the Train.

Z LOVE "THE
FU'NY LtTTLE ILOVE
WAY YOU SI P' CTHWA
YOUR. ODKASYOU MIX
MARTINI.yf
OH, YOU MAD,
THE MI.NUTE IMPETUOUS
I LOVED YU.,
3"
3.a

'YOU'RE THE MOST
WONpERUL t NEVER
WOMAN I MT'A MAN
IT EVER MT 'r LIKE y1u.
UUT WE ARE
YOU AE MY ES
MAY MIRAGE COMERpUE. AREp.
OH COME TOMY HUMBLE
TENT, UNVEIL THAE
LOVELIN STAT
MAK.ES ME. SHIVER
UNPER ThE BLAZING
SUN. PLEASE, MY
LITTLE DESERTF LOWER,
PLEASE, MARRY ME. 4"

I TI4OUGHTff
IOU i.OOKEP2
FAMILIAk .
Start somethin
ws
withlfolfsehmt*

I

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