100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 17, 1974

Grace
By CLARKE COGSDILL
Ales Agase, the Purdue coach, did not
look like a man whose team had ab-
sorbed its school's worst loss in 52 years.
He might just as well have been a
commodity broker in a windbreaker, ex-
hausted after a hard day of buying soy-
beans and unloading pork bellies. He
took the day's events in stride.
In football - as in most sports - it is
often easier to endure a rout, than to
lose narrowly on a score in the final mo-
ments. Doubts, recriminations, and if-
onlys come easily after close games, and
can be remembered for a long time. But
when you've been stomped, you have
nothing to explain, and therefore nothing
to regret.
"We got beat by a real good football
team," Agase said without emotion. "We
met a highly skilled team we couldn't
stop."
WHEN YOU'VE given up 51 points,
that's about all you can say. In such a
situation, it's hard to recall that your
team held the vaunted Michigan attack
" .. ; to three points in its first four posses-
sions. Not many other Wolverine victims
have fared as well..
In fact, the Boilermaker defense might
have worked all day, without Dennis
Franklin's passing to louse it up. Pur-
due's interior linemen shut down Michi-
gan's interior ground game thoroughly.
The Boilermakers defensed the option,
Daily Photo by STEVE KAGAN too, by assigning a tackle or end to go
after Franklin, and force a pitchout,
hoping for a turnover or a relatively

in

ad

short gain by the tailback.
But this plan works only if you can
get away with weakening your pass de-
fense. Unless the defensive cornerbacks
and linebackers remain almost exclusive-
ly run-conscious, there is no way they
can possibly consistently contain the tail-
back moving down the sideline.
FORCED TO PAY more attention to
their pass defense, the Boilermakers
promptly began to march backwards the
rest of the day. Holes began appearing
through the middle for Chuck Heater.
Vast spaces greeted Gordon Bell as he
carried the pitchouts around the ends.
The linebackers and cornerbacks, assign-
ed to protect these spots, were occupied
elsewhere.
Many plays later, Jeff Spahn ran his
first play from scrimmage for Michigan.
A graduating senior, his misfortune was
that he was recruited in the same posi-
tion, and in the same year, as Dennis
Franklin.
"It's a lot of fun," a smiling Spahn
remarked in the jubilant Michigan lock-
er room. "Out there, it's a bit more
organized than practice, but I really en-
joyed it."
HE SPOKE WITH even more enthus-
iasm when discussing his team and its
nrosi-ects. "I wasn't surprised we beat
Purdue this bad," Spahn claimed. "The
tenm was really ready for this one."
When asked to predict next week's
outcome in Columbus, his resnonse came
qpi(c.klv: "We'll beat 'em for sure."
If they do, Jeff Snahn will watch it

ersity
from the stands. He doesn't expect to
make the traveling squad, and he doesn't
regret it, either. Four years of hard
work have yielded him a couple of min-
utes of playing time, and a degree. As
far as he's concerned, that's great.
Agase, whose porous defense had just
provided one of the highlights of Spahn's
life, began to concentrate on the upcom-
ing Purdue-Indiana clash. He flatly re-
fused to compare the Wolverines with
Notre Dame, whom his Boilermakers up-
set earlier this season. He responded
"no," when asked for the ritual Ohio
State - Michigan prediction - and with
reason, since Purdue hasn't met the
Buckeyes this year.
HE WAS DEPRESSED only while he
looked over the list of Purdue players
injured yesterday, eight in all. "We've
had a lot of injuries," he sighed, "and
I had a lot of injuries when I was at
Northwestern, too."
As with the chorus of a Greek tragedy,
defeated coaches and obscure substitutes
provide the unifying force without which
the serious action would be impossible.
Excellence in anything is impossible un-
less there is a standard of comparison.
Whether in defeat or obscurity, partici-
nants in football deserve great credit
when they nl-v their parts well. Alex
Agase accented his loss with more grace
than many neople show in triumph. Jeff
Snahn has learned to make his obscure
role a source of great personal satisfac-
tion. Such neorle give football dignity
and, ultimately, its worth.

Armour goes after the bacon

- I
heads or tales
___Mrc Feldman. -=
Michigan seniors ..
e.. .roses not thorns
FINDING heroes in yesterday's smashing 51-0 Michigan vic-
tory over the Purdue Boilermakers is about as hard as finding
a dishonest politician in Washington.
Tailback Gordon Bell ran for 166 yards, giving him 601 in
the past four games, the defensive platoon played flawlessly
against a normally potent Purdue attack, and Michigan piled up
a big score without the aid of a single Riveter turnover.
Bo Schembechler has said many times that his teams
are built around great senior performances and the All-
American teams of the last six years back up his statement.
Ironically, in-many ways until yesterday, Mike Lantry and
Gil Chapman's final seasons have been less noteworthy than
their underclass records.
While tailbacks Bell and Rob Lytle have dominated the stat
sheets and headlines, the accomplishment of three-year main-
stays like Chapman and Lantry have been pushed to the side.
Few performers in Michigan history have had a penchant for
the long play like "The Jersey Jet," Chapman. Chapman has
electrified crowds with punt returns, scrimmage runs and TD
passes but on a switch from tailback to wingback is a sentence
to anonymity, in Schembechler's system.
The professional leagues seem to find fellows like Glenn
Doughty, Clint Haslerig and Chapman but it is a rare day
when any Michigan receiver catches five passes like Chap-
man did yesterday. Wrecking havoc in the Boilermaker
secondary, Chapman scored one touchdown and garnered
76 yards in all.
While Chapman's problems stem from his exile to wineback,
Lantry's were a bit more unclear. "Automatic Mike," had been
less than automatic on field goals this year after enjoying out-
standing sophomore and junior campaigns.
Two years ago, Lantry gave Michigan a televised victory
over Purdue with a tie-breaking field goal, and smashed Michigan
records with 50 and 51-yard boots against Stanford in 1973.
Seemingly snakebit since the last moments of the 10-10 tie
with Ohio State last November, Lantry had hit but four field
goals before his three kicks yesterday, and it had been bothering
him.
"It got me down mentally. When that first one went
through (43 yards), it really helned my confidence," said the
26-year-old left-footed kicker. "A lot of my attempts have'
been good hits but just off.
"A lot has to do with our playing our last game in the
Stadium. I'm a nostalgic guy. My lasting memories will come
from the last things we do. This game gives me a lot of con-
fidence."'
Still another colossal rout was a fitting farewell for the
seniors who played their last game in Michigan Stadium. In
their three years, Michigan outscored 19 guests, 572-79, and never
met defeat. Indeed, Purdue absorbed its most lopsided loss since
a 56-0 pasting by Iowa in 1922.
But undefeated streaks, shares of Big Ten titles and near
record setting crowds could mean nothing if the Buckeyes
manage a victory next Saturday in Columbus. Schembechler
was able to fire up his forces yesterday for that fourth con-
secutive conference title before thoughts began wandering
200 miles south on US-23.
Defensive signal-caller Steve Strinko finally was ready to
begin talking about Ohio State. "We're not satisfied yet. We're
not going to give the Big Ten Athletic Directors a chance to send
somebody else to the Rose Bowl. Why let there be a vote?
The best way is to win-then nobody has any qualms," said
Strinko.
Of course, technically Michigan could go to the Rose Bowl
even if Woody's Scarlet and Grey triumph, but one has to believe
that Michigan has the incentive, not to mention the support of
millions of Hayes-haters throughout the civilized world.
As teams like Florida and Vanderbilt get ready for trips to
the Pear and Avocado Bowls to meet other juggernauts with
6-4-1 records, Michigan knows it has to win its eleventh game

BOILERMAKERS RIVETED, 51-0

Defense

throttles

Purdue

(Continued from Page 1)
outcome, however, did not look
so obvious in the opening min-
utes of the contest. First-quar-
ter Wolverine offensive efforts!
were stymied by sloppy ball-
handling, and after 15 minutes:
the only score was a 43-yard
field goal by Mike Lantry.
Four times in the first half,
Blue tailbacks Bell and Rob
Lytle coughed up the football,
and although only one of the
fumbles was lost, they cut se-.
verely into Michigan's offensive
effectiveness.
Early in the second period,
however. Franklin & Co. finally
made things happen. Denny
dropped back from his own 48
and lofted one to Smith all the
way to the Purdue five. Smitty
took it in from there for Michi-
gan's first touchdown of the
day.
On the next possession, the
Wolverines drove 86 yards, all
but nine on the ground, with
Bell accounting for 69 of them
himself. The big play was a
39-yard jaunt by Gordie with a{
nitchout, and fullback ChuckI
Heater took it the final yard
for the score.
THERE WAS TIME for one

Sp~orts
NIGHT EDITORS:
LEBA HERTZ
MARCIA MERKER
more Michigan drive in the half,
and Franklin made the most of
it after taking over the ball at
the 'M' 45. He sent Heater up
the middle once and Bell around
the end twice to take it down
to the Purdue 37, then hit
Chapman over the middle with
two straight passes to the nine-
yard line.
Bell took a pitch around his
right end, found three waiting
tacklers barring his path to the
outside, and cut in beautifully
for a six-yard score.
The 24-0 Wolverine halftime
lead, was only the beginning,
though. The big Blue defense
kept Purdue punting and the
'M' offense took up right where
they left off after the inter-
mission.
The first drive of the third
stanza stalled at the Boilermak-
er 15, and Lantry again was

perfect on a field goal attempt,
this time from 32 yards out.
A FEW MINUTES later,
Franklin capped a 60-yard drive
by flipping a 23-yard aerial to
Chapman, and it was 34-zip.
Bell accounted for 36 yards in
the drive.
On the second play of the next
Michigan series, a wrenching
ankle-tackle sent Franklin to the
bench for the day, but substitute
Mark Elzinga proved equal to
the task. He quickly dropped a
pass out into the left flat to Ly-
tie, and the sophomore tailback
raced 36 yards down the side-
line for the score.
The Purdue agony was still
not over.dLytle, Elzinga, and
frosh fullback Scott Corbin
hammered away at them for
the entire fourthquarter, and
Michigan put the final ten
points on the scoreboard on a
35-yard Lantry boot, and a sev-
en-yard Lytle run.
ALL-IN-ALL, it was an en-
couraging way for Michigan to
enter its final and crucial week
of the year. For the fifth
straight year, Michigan accom-
plished the task that Ohio State
once again couldn't ;- winning
the first ten to enter the Michi-
gan OSU contest undefeated.
The Wolverines destroyed
Purdue, even though the Boilers
didn't commit a single turn-
over. "The big plays did it,"
Bo explained.

Boilers run out of steam

Illinois 0 0 0 0- 0 '
MICHIGAN 3 21 17 i1-51
Mich - FG Lantry 43 yds.
Mich - Smith 52 yd. pass (Lan-
try kick)
Mich-iHeater 1 yd. run (Lantry
kick)
Mich - Bell 6 yd. run (Lantry
kick)
Mich - FG Lantry 32 yds.
Mich - Chapman 23, yd. pass
(Lantry kick)
Mich - Lytle 36 yd. pass (Lantry
kick)
Mich - FG Lantry 35 yds.
Mich - Lytie 7 yd. run (Lantry

kick)

Pu

First Downs
Rushes (att/yds.)
Passing (,tt com/int)
10
Passing cards
Fumbles (nnl/lost)
Penalties (no/yds.)
Punting (no/avg)
RUSHING

urdue
10
37-68
0-22-0
117
2-0
5-50
11-34

Mich
29
71-396
8-15-0
185
4-1
2-20
1-34
avg
S 7.2
S 4.4
3.7
5.0
21.0j
8.0
1 1.0I

Richardson
King
Dierking
Gross
Pruitt
Northington
vitali
Beery
Boykin
Nagel
Franklin
Elzinga
Spahn
Vitali
Nagel
Chapman
Smith
Lytle
Burton
Cooper
Dierking
Arnold
wirgowski
Beery
Patterson
Pruitt

1
PURDUE
11
4
9
5
4
1
2
1
PASSING
MICHIGAN
att
12
2
1

PURDUE
16 7
6 3

4 19

3
53
16
24
6
-29
2
3
-7
comp
7
1
0

4.8
4.0
2.7
1.2
-7.2
2.0
1.5:
-7.0.
yds
149
361
0;
106i
11
long
23
52
36,
201
18
4
20
17
16
91

d R

Beli
Lytle
Heater
Franklin
Chapman
Corbin
Elzinga

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
WOLVERINE FRESHMAN fullback, Mike Cor bin (34) carries the ball as Purdue defensive
back Tom Andres (13) prepares to tackle him i n the third quarter at Michigan Stadium yester-
day. In five attempts, Corbin gained 40 of Mich igan's 396 total yards rushing.
FINAL, 7=5

MICHIGAN
att
23
15
13
6
1
3

Minnesota

yds
166
66
48
30
21
40
3

RECEIVING
MICHIGAN
no
5
2
1
PURDUE
2
1
1
I
1
1
1
2

yds.
74
75
36
31
18
4
20
17
16
9
2

By BRIAN DEMING
Special To The Daily
MINNEAPOLIS - After spot-
ting the Wolverines two quick
goals in the opening minutes,
the Minnesota Gophersrebound-
ed and earned a 7-5 victory here
last night.
The 'Gold Country' favorites
mercilessly poured shots on
Michigan goalie Frank Zimmer-
man throughout the first two
periods. The freshman netmind-
er was forced to make 38 saves,
while allowing all seven Min-
nesota goals in those two per-
iods - three on second period
power plays.
The game began where the
Wolverines left off Friday
night. Goals by Gary Mor-

:r ... .. . .. . .. . .. . .... .t
Harriers earn
NCAA berth
Special To The Daily
MADISON - After taking the Big Ten Cross Country
Championship last weekend, the Michigan Cross Country
team qualified yesterday for the NCAA National Cross
Country Championships to be held Nov. 25 in Bloomington,'
Ind.fgA
'The Wolverines mounted 84 points for third place behind
Eastern Michigan with 33 and Wisconsin's 76 in the NCAA
IV regionals.
As in the Big Ten meet, Illinois' sophomore Craig
Virgin finished first in the six-mile jog. Eastern's trio ::

rison and Kris Manery befo
two minutes had elaps
seemed to send Michigan
its way to another rout
the distress of the 7,383 W
liams Arena fans.
"Those first two goals g
us a false sense of securi
Coach Dan Farrell observ
"We fell into a defense typ
game."
Morrison scored at 0:19 o
shot that flashed past Gol
goalie Bill Moen before
sophomore had a chance to r
Two subsequent penalties
up Michigan's second goal
roughing penalty against M
Polich followed by a pen
against the Minnesota be
gave Michigan a two man
vantage. Manery scored &
Pat Hughes tipped it tol
at 1:24.
But the Gophers came ba
at 10:31 as Warren Mi
scored the first of his 1
goals, flicking the puck o
a sprawling Zimmerman.
Then at 12:12 while1
teams had two men in thex
alty box, Gopher freshman R
Larson scored on a 30 foot
Icers snowed unde
FIRST PERIOD
SCORING: 1. Mich - Morr
(T. Lindskog) 0:19; 2. Mich-I
ery (Hughes, Moretto) 1:24 pp
Minn - Miller (Polich, Schne
10:41; 4. Minn - Reed Larson

decks dekers
ore past both Manery and Zim- goals of the defending NCAA
sed merman. champs at 14:09 of the second
on The Gophers went ahead less stanza.
to than a minute later on a goal The Gophers tallied their fi-
Vil- by Mark Lambert. I knal goal with less than a min-
Randy Neal tied it up for the ute left in the fateful second
ave Maize and Blue at 17:01 on a period as Robin Larson scored
ty," 15 foot shot that sailed by Moen on a three on one break.
ved. from the left side. A Dave De- Michigan layed even with
e of bol pass to Neal set up the goal the Gohers in the third e r-
by drawing the goalie out of iod bit could only account for
n a position.ts one goal, notched by Moretto
pher Penalties were costly to at 1:08.
the Michigan in the second period
est. where a man disadvantage It looked like Michigan was
set set up= three Minnesota power going to make a comeback. The
. A play goals. "The penalties Wlverines outplayed the Goph-
like were the only difference in ers, but countless opportunities
alty the game," said Manery. wept awry.
inch "They capitalized." "I think we could have won
ad- Pat Phippen, Joe Micheletti, it in the third period with a

Big Ten
SStandings
CONFERENCE GAMES

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
MSU
Wisconsin
Illinois
Minnesota
Purdue
Iowa
Northwestern
Tnrhinnn

w 1 t pfp
7 0 0 203
6 1 0 287
5 1 1 1631
4 3 0 1911
3 3 1 1061
2 50 961
2 5 0 133
2 5 0 1121
2 5 0 1022
1 6 0 1071

pa
47
75
100
165
135
192
201
170
249
167

after
him
ack
Iler
two
ver
both
pen-
Reed
shot
f.
rison
Man-
p.; 3.
ider)
(Po-

SCORES

1Ce'"iiv35h}: 5:54 r}:vr: ................... ..... ...}5? {.":::": ii :vi}X :......_. _......... 3F: .F. h ............................

and Miller all found the net in few breaks," remarked Cap-
that period on power plays. tain Randy Trudeau.
With the score 6-3, Michigan Michigan returns home with
center Angie Moretto scored on a split, leaving them 2-4 in the
a shot from 30 feet out that WCHA. Next weekend the Wol-
bla7ed past a Minnesota de- verines will be tested again,
fenseman and M o e n. That this time by the Michigan Tech
brought Michigan within two Huskies, at Yost Ice Arena.

': ';

.. .. a..

GRIDDE PICKS
MICHIGAN 51, Purdue 0
Obio State 35, Iowa 10
MSU 19, Indiana 10
Illinois 17, Minnesota 14
Wisconsin 52, Northwestern 7
N. Carolina St. at Arizona St., inc.
Arkansas 24, SMU 24
Bavln 17. Texas Tieh 10

Texas A&M 37, Rice 7
Texas 81, Texas Christian 16
P-nt, State 35. Ohio 16
Notre name 14, Pittsburgh 10
Weber St. 1, E. Michigan 14
Southern Cal. 42, Washington]
Stanford 17, Oregon 0
California 37, Washington St.3
UCiA 33. Orre-on St.14

11
33

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan