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November 17, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-17

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 17,.1974

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, November 17, 1974

WOODEN NICKEL NIGHT
BEER NIGHT SPECIAL
Every Wednesday
from 8:00 p.m. on
PASTA GALORE NIGHT.
Every Tuesday
Spaghetti or Mostaccioli
for only $1.29
DOWNTOWN LOCATION
114 E. WASH 1NGTON 665-3231
Edward Goldsmith
The Next Civilisation"
Tuesday, 19 November 1974
8 P.M., Rackham Lecture Hall
Ar. Goldsmith is the Managing Direc-
tor of The Ecologist, in Wadebridge,
Cornwall, England.
He is the author of numerous works on the impact
of science and technology upon society, among
them Blueprint for Survival (1972); The Epis-
timological and Behavioral Basis of Culturalism
(1974); "The Limits of Growth in: Natural Sys-
tems"; "Ener'gy and the GNP."
Mr. Goldsmith comments:
"The reactions of b o t h politicians and
scientists to the publication of such docu-
ments as The Limits to Growth and the
Blueprint For Survival has been alarming.
The theme of these documents is simple
and painfully obvious. Limitless g r o w t h
cannot be sustained in a world of finite
resources and with a limited capacity to
absorb waste. This means that we must de-
velop a society that is not geared to ever
increasing growth. It doesn't matter whe-
ther industrial society can be maintained
for one, ten, fifty, a hundred, or two hun-
dred years; the fact is that it is moving in
the wrong direction at an exponential rate
and the sooner the direction is reversed the
easier will be the transition."t

ROOM and BOARD
in CO-OPS

Observers hit
(Continued from Page 1) rather obvious. If they can get;
statistics to support that kind of away with a .3 per cent drop3

'U'

reasoning

NORTH and CENTRAL CAMPUS
Male and Female Openings
for Winter Term
APPLY room 4002 Michigan Union
or CALL 662-4414

PROF. BERNARD LEWIS
PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
will be speaking at
4:00 P.M. ON
Political Vocabulary in Islam
(sponsored by Near Eastern & North African Studies
and Judaic Studies)
8:00 P.M. ON
Palestinian Entity: A Historical View
(sponsored by Judaic Studies Dept.)
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1974
ANGELL HALL, RM. 1025

claim whether it's true or not,"
he. says. "Intuitively, I just
think they haven'tvbeen trying
hard enough."
"They increased the enroll-
ment for a few years," Clay
continued, "but that was only
because of the pressure of the
times.
"Because the pressure BAM'
put on the University has been
removed, I'm sure the black
enrollment will decline even
more next year. The trend is
THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 64
sunady, November 17, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published di a i l y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-I
day through Saturday morning .
Subscriptionrates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
local mail (other states and foreign).

this year, they can continue to
get away with even more in the,
future."
SAM PERKINS, a 1973 Uni-
versity graduate who lives at
Trotter House, a black resi-
dence hall formed as a result
of a BAM demand, agrees with
Clay, adding, "It's typical. I
think it's obvious that the Uni-
versity isn't making an honest
attempt to reach the black col-
lege-bound student.
"They also have done a poor
job at letting black students
know about the Opportunity
Program," Perkins says. "I
know it's in existence, but I've
never really found out what it's
all about."
The Opportunity Program was:
established 10 years ago to re-
cruit, counsel and provide fi-
nancial aid for disadvantaged
students.
ASSOCIATE D I R E C T O R
of Admissions Lance Erickson
concedes, "There's not really a
lack of interest about the Op-
portunity Program, but rather
a general lack of knowledge
about it.
A n - -I

"Black students many times
won't come to see the program
counselors because they don't
think there's any chance for
them to benefit from it."
However, Erickson still main-
tains there have been "steadily
increased efforts" in recruiting
and orientation for black stu-
dents.
"THE DECLINE in black re-;
cruitment is partially a result
of the closing of the Detroit!
schools at the beginning of the
year," he claims. "We got be-
hind in recruiting then and just
never caught up. We couldn't
make any contacts."
Perkins counters, however,
that the University's recruit-
ment program was hampered
by more than the temporary
closing of Detroit schools.
"What the recruiting program
needs," he argues, "is more
black people doing the recruit-
ing. They also need to take
more into consideration than
the prospective student's grade
point average.
"YOU HAVE TO take a lot:
into account about the black
student's home life and person-
ality before arbitrarily saying
2.5 grade average is the mini-'

mum," he says.
Although the 10 per cent black
enrollment goal has not yet
been -ttined, the Regents
claim they will eventually ful-
fill their commitment.
Reddix Allen, Student Govern-
ment Council executive vice
president for minority affairs,
contends that the Regents can
make good their 10 per cent
black enrollment promise, but
questions whether they will.
"THE UNIVERSITY has not
put out a substantial efort,"
Allen claims. "They made a
commitment and I'd like to
know why they haven't met it.
I think they can, and I'd like
to know why they haven't. Ten
ner cent is a very reasonable
figure."
According to Clay, although
the University initially met sev
er'l of the 1970 BAM demands
other than the enrollment goal,
it has not continued to support
these concessions financially.
And altho-gh many of the
BAM demands have been side-
lined by the University, Clay is
do"'htf1 that a movement simi-
1-r to PAM will oriainate to
e-for- tle agreement.

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HELD OVER
"The Filthiest
Show In Town"
An hilarious spoof
of a well known
TV game show
PLUS
"Hot Pants"
persons under 18
cannot be admitted

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Day Calendar Science. Technology. Future Socie-
Sunday, November 17 ties: Dinest Mohan, "From Yoga to
WUOM: Lecture-panel, "Biomedi- Nuclear Energy: Science and Tech-
cine & the Future of Man: Birth, nology in. India," W. Conf. Rm.,
Life, & Death," with James Neel, Rackhamn, noon.
chmn, Human Genetics, Med. Ctr., Ctr. South, Southeast Asian Stu-
Gardner Quarton, dir., MHRI,& dies: Stanley Hoffman, "Buddhism
profs., Int. Med., Keith Henley & in America - The Naropa Insti-
John weller, 12:45 pm. tute." Commons Rm., Lane Hall,
TV Ctr.: The Music Shop: Faking noon
It, WWJ TV, Channel 4, noon. Values Seminar: E. Conf. Rm.,
FTP: "Seesaw," Power, 3,.8 pm. 4th FMr., Rackham, noon-2.
IM Sports: Family recreation, S e n a tae Assembly: Rackham
State, Hoover, 1:30-5:30 pm. Amph., 3:15 pm.
Music School: Faculty Chamber Ctr. Near Eastern, N. African
Concert, Rackham, 4 pm; Wayne Studies; Judaic Studies: Bernard
Owens. baritone, Recital Hall, 4:30 Lewis. Princeton Ut, "Political Vo-
pm; Julie Westgate, viola, Recital cabulary in Islam." 1025 Angell, 4
Hall, 8 pm. pm.
Monday, November 18 Classical Studies: Kelsey Museum;
WUOM: Cont. live coverage, con- History: Russell Meiggs, Baliol 001-
firmation hearings of Nelson Rocke- lege.hOxford, "The Timber Supply
feller as v-p., 10 am. of the Cty of Rome," Aud. A, An-
-11pAm.

r

c

I-

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31 N. Washington
Ypsilanti
482-3300

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HOW
YOU CAN SPREAD)
1HE MESaAGE
OF O4E...1HE
LONIE OF CHRIST
FOR ALL PEOPLE,
Have you ever considered the priesthood as a w
to serve people? The Paulist Fathers are a small
community of American priests. Progressive, sear
young and energetic, they form a religious family.
A Paulist is a man of the Spirit, a man of his tir
He rejoices in the signs of hope around him and
celebrates with the people he serves.
Every Paulist is a missionary: in the pulpit, or p
house, on the campus, in the inner-city. He comm
cates with the spoken word, the printed page, and,
contemporary media. His mission is to all of Amei
His message is love; the love of Christ for all peop
For more information send for The Paulist Papers
Write to: Father Don C. Campbell, Room 100
PAULISr
FAiHERS
415 WEST 59TH ST .NEW YORK, N.Y.10019

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The Third Annual Union
Gallery Holiday Show
an invitational exhibit and sale of
ceramics, prints, paintings, sculpture,
photographs, metalwork, fibres.
Come to our opening reception on
SUNDAY, NOV. 17 from 4-6p.m.
Music 0 Refreshments
located on the fi rst floor of the
MICHIGAN UNION
gallery hours are: Tues., Thurs. 1-8
XAIJ r> C. . -4

;II
,i
I
I
Pik
I
1 II

S.E.l.
(Students for Educational
Innovation)
will be accepting nomina-
tions for office of President
at the:
MASS MEETING
Monday, Nov. 18
7 p.m.-Rm. 1234
School of Education Bldg.

Epidemiology: Thos. Francis, Jr.
Memorial lecture, Wilbur Downs,
Yale, "Lassa Virus: Facts and Fan-
cies." Aud., Vaughan Bldg., 4 pm.
High Energy Seminar: Dr, A.
Barnes, Cp'. Inst. of Tech., "-p
Charge Exchange at Fermilab Ener-
gies."
Guild House: Male role workshop-
discussion, "Trusting Men: Relating
to other men as competitors,
friends, and lovers," 802 Monroe,
7:30 pm.
AV Ctr : Antonia, Pendleton Otr.,
Union, 8 pin.
Romance"Languages: Yves Rey-
Herme, dir., l'Alliance Francaise,
"Une Femme Ecrivain-Simone de
Beauvoir," W. Conf. Rm., Rack-
ham, 8 pm.

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