100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 16, 1974 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Saturday, November 16, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

PURDUE'S OFFENSE THREATENS -,

Ml

Mich
By AL HRAPSKY
The sign hanging in the Michi-
gan locker room this week,:
"Don't let the Boilermakers be
Spoilermakers," is not merely
a ruse to arouse a Wolverine:
squad that has had problems
converting yardage into touch-
downs lately. Instead, it serves
as a constant reminder of what
has been occurring regularly
this year in college football-
upset!
The Wolverines will be vy-
ing for their fourth straight
Big Ten championship and
fifth in the last six years as i
they take the field against a
stubborn and erratic Purdue
team that upset Notre Dame,
in a regionally televised game
today.
Although the Riveters have
been unable to upend Michigan
in the last six years, they have
consistently posed a strong
threat to Wolverine title bids.
In fact, as recently as 1971 and
1972 the Wolverines had to re-
sort to their kicking game to
pull out last minute victories.
In 1971 the ' Boilermakers
forced Michigan's Dana Coin to
produce a 25-yard field goal in
the last 43 seconds to preserve
a 20-17 victory and an outright
championship.
That old axiom that history
repeats itself seemed to sur-
face a year later when a Mike

ig an
Lantry field goal sailed through
the uprights to ice a 9-6 decision
and the assurance of a tie for
the title.
Hopefully Michigan will not
have to rely on another last
minute boot to win a share of
the conference championship
as Lantry has only connected
on four field goals in 13 at-
tempts this season.
The last time that Purdue
lived up to its Spoilermaker
image against the Wolverines
was in 1966 when Bob Griese
led them to an exciting 22-21
victory. That game was decided
in the third quarter when Griese
punted 44 yards to the Michigan
goal line where Rick Sygar was
tackled in the end zone for a
safety.
Although the Boilermakers
sport a dismal 3-5-1 record com-
ing into today's game, they
average 401 offensive yards a
game in Big Ten play, which is
second only to Ohio State. Michi-
gan averages 381 yards in Big
Ten contests.
Michigan's defensive sec-
ondary will be put to the test
as 154 yards of Purdue's
average offensive total has
come via the airways. Larry
Burton, an Olympic sprinter
who was fourth in the 200
meter at Munich in 1972, has
collected nearly one half of
the Riveters aerial yardage

battles Purdue

and should prove a menace to
Michigan defenders.
Bo Schembechler, trying to
put the big game in Columbus
next week in the back of his
mind, commented on Purdue's
explosive offense.
"With a solid ball club like
theirs, you can't say that you'll
try to stop their passing game
and then forget about the run.
They have a good all around
attack.
"They also have one of the
finest sets of wide receivers
we've seen all season."
According to Schembechler,
the cold front and snow flur-
ries that have settled upon
the state may prove a factor
in the game today and judging
from Purdue's recent perform-
ances, this may work to the
Wolverines' advantage.
It seems that the Boilermak-
ers have a tendency to cough
up the football-a fumble of the
opening kickoff against Min-
nesota last week probably cost
them a 24-20 decision.
Coach Alex Agase, who has
never succeeded in defeating a
Schembechler-coached Michigan
squad in his years at North-
western and Purdue, is most
wary of the threat posed by a
healthy Dennis Franklin.
"Franklin is an intricate part
of Michigan's offensive plans,"
Agase relates. "He's an impor-
tant fctor inAthe o ptioplMa

quarterback, he has the ability age but two touchdowns. A
to turn a broken play into dropped Franklin to Jim Smith
long yardage." aerial and a Gordon Bell fumble
The Wolverines will have to thwarted possible scores.
be more proficient in moving This afternoon's contest will
the ball across the goal line mark the last time that some
than they were against Indiana twenty Michigan seniors will
and Illinois. Although Michigan perform in Michigan Stadium.
dominated the first half against Barring yet another major up-
Illinois, gaining 259 yards to set they have a good chance of
the Illini's 25, they could man- going out, in style.
THELENEUPS

MICHIGAN
Offense

PURDUE

(37)
(67)
(74)
(50)
(65)
(64)
(84)
( 9)
(25)
(44)
(24)
(81)
(97)
(77)
(32)
(33)
(59)
(56)
(35)
(28)
(20)
( 6)

Jim Smith (200)
Steve King (245)
Kirk Lewis (240)
Dennis Franks (225)
Dave Metz (235)
Pat Tumpane (240)
Greg DenBoer (233)
Dennis Franklin (180)
Rob Lytle (190)
Chuck Heater (210)
Gil Chapman (180)
Dan Jilek (205)
Jeff Perlinger (235)
Greg Morton (230)
Larry Banks (210)
Carl Russ (220)
Steve Strinko (230)
Tim Davis (210)
Don Dufek (195)
Tom Drake (175)
Harry Banks (185)
Dave Brown (188)

SE
LT
LG
C
RG
ST
TE
QB
TB
FB
WB

(22)
(78)
(55)
(58)
(69)
(5)
(81)
(18)
(25)
(38)
(19)

Defense

Larry Burton (190)
Jeff Stapleton (230)
Tom Gibson (225)
Jim Polak (230)
Ralph Perretta (240)
Connie Zelencik (230)
Barry Santini (210)
Mark Vitali
Scott Dierking (210)
Mike Pruitt (215)
Paul Beery (180)
Rick Oliver (210)
Ken Novak (275)
Roger Ruwe (220)
Stan Parker (230)
Ron Hardy (225)
Joe Sullivan (225)
Mike Burgamy (210)
Pat Harris (165)
Fred Cooper (180)
Dwight Lewis (175)
Anthony Thompson (165)

LE
LT
RT
RE
WLB
MLB
MG
Wolf
WHB
SHB
S

(86)
(74)
(62)
(90)
(94)
(36)
(56)
(46)
(42)
(44)
(47)

S ,.... awhich he's super at simply be-
cause he has such quick feet.
"Because he is a complete
Duke reprimands
Illinois' BBackmean
CHICAGO UPI - Big Ten Commissioner Wayne Duke
last night publicly reprimanded Illinois Coach Bob Black-
man for "unsportsmanlike conduct" in his blast at the
officiating in last Saturday's 14-6 Illini loss to Michigan.
By BRIAN DEMING
The reprimand was the second imposed this week Special To The Daily
by Duke under a new Sportsmanlike Conduct Code MINNEAPOLIS-There wasn't
adopted by the Big Ten this fall, any snow in the Twin Cities but
that didn't stop the avalanche
On Monday, he slapped Ohio State Coach Woody Hayes here as the Michigan Wolver-f
with a reprimand for criticizing the officiating in his team's ines b u r i e d the Minnesota
upset loss to Michigan State Saturday. Gophers under a 10-1 score last
night.
Blackman's chief complaint centered around a pass It was the most goals scored
from Illinois quarterback Jeff Hollenbach to Joe Smalzer against the defending NCAAI
with one minute left in the game and the Illini driving for champions since January of
a potentially game-tying touchdown. Smalzer caught the 1972 and almost doubled theI
16-yard pass, but the officials ruled his feet were out of the total goals scored against the
end zone before he had possession. Gophers this year.
"We blew those guys out,"
"We looked through the film frame by frame," exulted Gary Morrison after
the rout that saw the Wolver-
Blackman said. "It's hard to see when you run the film in res open with four goals in
fast. He was clearly in bounds when he caught the the first stanza. "It wassthe
pass." best game since I've been at
Michigan."
No suspension accompanies the public reprimand, but For goaltender Frank Zim-
Duke warned that under the new code, repeated offenders merman, it was a near shutout.
can be suspended from coaching for one game. "I was up for this one," re-
marked the freshman who was
At the time he spoke out, Blackman said he was pro- playing in familiar territory,
testing in fairness to his team, saying the Illini could have his home being Edina, Minn., a
few miles south of St. Paul.
tied second-ranked Michigan with a two-point conversion Zimmerman made 26 saves in
following the nullified touchdown. the contest as the defense
thwarted nearly all of Minne-
..... :.r.{rsota's scoring opportunities.

Doily Photo by STEVE KAGAN
MICHIGAN'S STEVE STRINKO upends Iowa's Rod Wellington (40) near the goal line in the
first game of the year. Strinko's teammates, Harry Banks (20) and Dave Elliot (45) also move
in to prevent the hapless Hawkeyes from scoring. The Blue defense will also be put to the
test again today as they entertain a potent Purdue Boilermaker sqqad.

GOPHERS BURIED, 10-1

ska ters

rip

M innesota

t fi; Dail
I Spoils
NIGHT EDITORS:
JEFF SCHILLER
BILL STIEG
"We had outstanding defen-
sive play," said sophomore'
Greg Nate',. Coach Dan Farrell
also cited an improved defense
as well as "solid goaltending"
as factors contributing to the
win.
But the real surprise was the
scoring onslaught. "We were
taking advantage of our shots,"

Moretto contributed his sec-
ond score at 6:34 of the second
period on a shot from ten feet
in front of the Minnesota goal.
To the disappointment of the
partisan Williams Arena crowd
of 7,352, it was a hapless eve-
ning for netminder Moen. Fin-
ally, after allowing his eighth
goal at 3:18 into the final
stanza on a shot just inside the
blue line from senior Werner,
Moen was replaced by Jeff
Tscherne.
But even that did not hinder
the scoring assault. Larry John-
son, like Zimmerman, a native
of Edina, made an unassisted
shorthanded goal at 5:51 ofthe
third period and Morrison add-
ed Michigan's fifth, and final,
power play goal of the evening.

services of Bill Thayer and
D o u g Lindskog. Freshman
Thayer suffered a shoulder
injury w h i 1 e Lindskog re-
ceived a game misconduct
after a brawl in the third
period. The misconduct auto-
matically makes a player in-
eligible for t h e following
game.
Other Michigan goal scorers
who will be expected to con-
tribute again tonight were Kris
Manery and Pat Hughes, who
had first period scores, Natale,
who along with Moretto had a
first period score, and Kardos,
who along with Werner, John-s
sond M rrison made a third
period score.
Minnesota's only score came
ion a power play at 12:17 of the:
first period. Mike Polich scored
on a 30 foot shot ten seconds
after Michigan's Dave Shand;
was sent off the ice for hook-I
ing.
Billboard
Basketball season tickets
for students will not go on
sale until Wednesday and
Thursday of next week, in-
stead of Monday and Tuesday
as previously announced. La-
bor troubles beyond control
of the University caused a
delaysin delivery of the
tickets.

Solid forechecking and preci-
sion passing were what gave
Michigan its overwhelming suc-
cess. According to Moretto,
"We checked them well, press-
ed them well. It was a good
team effort." More of the sameI
tonight will give Michigan an-
other victory and a sweep of
the series.
Avalanche!
FIRST PERIOD
SCORING: 1. Mich - Moretto
(Werner, Morrison) 5:53;~2. Mich-
D. Lindskog (Moretto, R. Palmer)
9:28 (pp); 3. Minn-Polich (Auge,
Schneider) 12:17 (pp); 4. Mich -
sughes (Thayer, Manery) 17:09; 5.
Mich - Manery (D. Lindskog) (pp).
19:58.
SCORING: 6. Mich - Moretto (D.
Lindskog, R. Palmer) 6:34 (pp);j
7. Mich - Natale (Kardos, Manery)
12:03.
THIRD PERIOD
SCORING: 8. Mich - Kardos (un-
assisted) 0:22; 9. Mich - werner
(Shand) 3:18 (p); Mich - Johnson
(unassisted) 5:51; (shorthanded);
11. Mich - Morrison (Moretto
12:34. (pp)

}4
$2.50 6:
FRI...SAT,-SUN.
RAGTIME, FUNK,
and Goodtime Music
WITH
SPIDER JOHN
KOERNER
AND
ANDY COHEN
1411 Hill TRET

noted Gary Kardos. The L i- "We put it all together,"
vonia winger picked up a third crowed an exhilarated Farrell.
period unassisted goal for the "I hope we save something for
Wolverines' seventh score. tomorrow."
The scoring began at 5:53 Tonight, the Wolverines will
in the first period as junior have to play without the
center Angie Moretto scored
on a rebound. The opportunity
came after a Frank Werner S C O R ES
shot bounced a w a y from
Gopher goaltender Bill Moen.

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY'S
OFFICE OF STUDENT LIFE
PRESENTS
THE PLYLLIS LAMNUT DANCE COMPANY

SPAR TANS INVADE INDIANA

Hawkeyes host angry Buckeyes

NBA
Detroit 117, Seattle 103
Kansas City-Omaha 110,
Boston 109
washington 104, New Orleans 95
Chicago 102, Phoenix 95
NHL
Atlanta 2, Philadelphia 2
Kansas City 4, New York
Islanders 2

---- .__._._._._ -- ------ d

By KATHY HENNEGHAN
The Big Ten moves into its
penultimate round of play to-'
day, with Ohio State at Iowa,
Michigan State at Indiana, Wis-
consin at Northwestern and
Illinois at Minnesota, in addi-
tion to Michigan's hosting of,
Purdue. ,
The Ohio State-Iowa contest
should be interesting in that it
matches the conference's best
offensive team against one of
its worst defensive teams. It
should be even more interest-
ing because Ohio State is com-
ing off last week's historic up-
set at the hands of Michigan
State.
Iowa head coach Bob Com-
mings is in the unenviable po-
sition of preparing his squad,
2-4 in the Big Ten and 3-6 over-
all, to meet the angry Buckeyes.
If the Bucks are half as furious
Harriers in---
District rune

as coach Woody Hayes, the and Michigan must drop their
Hawkeyes are in for a long last two games to Purdue and
afternoon. Ohio State.
"We'll be playing a very dis- Spartan coach Denny Stolz,
turbed and dangerous football who had warned fans that it j
team here Saturday," Com- would be at least a couple years
mings said in somewhat of an before MSU was back on thej
understatement. "Everything in winning trail, thinks the pic-
this game is based on our capa- ture has changed.
bilities of playing beyond our "We might have closed the
abilities. I have seen Ohio gap a little quicker than I
State's films and it's no secret thought we would," Stolz said.
we're going to try and run the "I think we're now one of the=
ball against them." better teams in the country."
In practice this week, Iowa Indiana coach Lee Corso is
concentrated on stopping OSU's concerned with defensing Spar-
quarterback Cornelius Green tan quarterback Charlie Bag-
and tailback Archie Griffin. gett, whom he rates as one of
"Griffin has so many fantas- the most versatile in the coun-
tic moves that I don't see try.
how he can be stopped," noted "He rolls out and runs, and
Commings. "The trouble is, he throws well," said Corso.
when you do find something "He hits a lot of long passes
that's effective in stopping because he freezes the half-
Griffin, everything else in backs with his rollout."
their offense opens up." In other action, Wisconsin
Commings said his squad travels to Northwestern. The
would have to be "consistently Badgers are looking to clinch'
consistent" to have any chance their firstwinning seasoncsince
of winning." 1963. They are also out for their
Michigan State, 4-1-1 in the fourth road victory of the sea-
Big Ten, travels to Indiana, 1-5. son, a feat last achieved by the:
State is ranked 15th in the team of 1901.
nation as a result of beating Wisconsin is a two-touch-
Ohio State, and the Spartans down favorite. Northwestern,_
still have a long shot at cap- however, is not to be taken
turing a share of the conference lightly. Although the Wildcats
title. To achieve this, they must are 2-4 in the conference and
depend on a miraculous turn of 3-6 overall, they are out for
events-OSU must lose to Iowa, : their third straight win after
....B..Td.in gs:. .:. .. f."; . ...... 'V.
Big Ten Standings

beating Indiana and Minne-
sota.
The game will pit the third
and fourth best rushers in the
Big Ten against each other:
Wisconsin's Billy Marek and
Northwestern's Jim Pooler.
Illinois travels to Minnesota,
where the Illini are six point
favorites. The Illini are 2-3-1
in the Big Ten after last week's
14-6 loss to Michigan. Minnesota
is 2-4.
S.E.l.
(Students for Educational
Innovation)
will be acceptinq nomina-
tions for office of President
at the:
MASS MEETING
Monday, Nov. 18
7 p.m.-Rm. 1234
School of Education BIdq.
First
143Z N1
SSA

F

The Third. Annual Unioni
Glery Holiday Show.,
an invitational exhibit and sale of
ceramics, prints, paintings, sculpture,

i
r

nhntnnrnnhc mpfnlwnrl< fihrP-,

NOV. 15 & 16 PEASE AUDITORIUM 8 P.M. $2.50
Tickets available at McKenny Union and at the door
With the Support of the Michigon Council for the Arts
This event is made possible with the supportof the Michigan
Council for the Arts. Established in 1966 by the Michigan
Legislaure. the Council piovides a wide variety of programs
and services in the performing, visual, and literary arts,
available to community groups and organizations throughout
the State. For further information oan how this agency can
contribute to the cultural growth of your community, write
to: Michigan Council for the Arts, 1200 Sixth Avenue, Detroit,
Mvil48226.

ili

Come to our opening reception on
SUNDAY, NOV. 17 from 4-bp.m.

11H

'I

FI1

Music 0 Refreshments
located on the first floor of the
MICHIGAN UNION

gallery hours are:

Tues., Thurs. 1 -8
Wed., Fri., Sat. 10-5
Sun. 12-5

The
University of* Michigan's
MEN'S GLEE CLUB

i

By ANDY GLAZER
Fresh from an impressive:
win in the Big Ten Champion-,
ships, the Michigan Cross Coun-
try team today faces the chat-
lenge of 23 other teams in the
NCAA District 4 qualifying meet
at Madison, Wisconsin.
The top four teams in the
meet will go on to the NCAA
finals to be held in Blooming-
ton, Indiana on November 25.
In addition to the top four

Prasb tarian Church
)ashtenaw (betivcn hit £ So. Univcrsit)

...is proud to announce
that it has just released
a new Christmas Album,
in stro It can

MPSON

by G. F. HANDEL

CONFERENCE

ALL GAMES

PRESENTED BY

w

0

I

0

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan