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November 15, 1974 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-15

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Friday, November 15, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace Nine

Friday, November 1 5, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

New building a boondoggle? University students propose

(Continued from Page 1)
if one person is working in an
office, he , or she must light:
most of a floor to work.
" The massive 90x360 - foot
"design room," praised by ad-I
ministrators as "one of the larg-
est single teaching spaces on
campus," 'has drawn the most:
criticism. The room is unpar-E
titioned, and students complain
that intense levels of noise and
light make work difficult. They
also object to a lack of dividing

walls between work areas. ]
* In a structure intended to!
hold 1200 students, virtually no
accommodation has been made
for people outside calssrooms.
The only lounge area is a tiny
1 o u n g e with concession ma-
chines. The only library holds!
a maximum of 30 people. '
ARCHITECTURE
School Dean Robert Metcalf in-'
sists the new building is a boon
and not a boondoggle.
"The building functions fair-

SGC condemns 'U'

By TIM SCHICK
Student Government Council
last night voted to refuse to
seat students on a committee
which council members claim
was formed illegally.
By a 16Y-2 1/4 vote, SGC re-
fused to appoint any students to
the Facilities Appeals Board
and condemned the administra-
tion and the Board of Regents.
for taking SGC's duties upon
themselves.
Minorit ies
i Pi
drop, here
(Continued from Page 1)
Erickson said there has'been
"no dramatic increase" in
minority recruiting efforts since
1971.
GOODMAN admitted his pro-
gram's recruitment efforts
"peaked in 1971" after the BAM
strike. But he said the pro-
gram is now shifting its priori-
ties to concentrate on retaining
currently-enrolled students, in-
stead of recruiting.

THE NEW board, instituted1
after the Regents objected to+
showings of X-rated movies on ]
campus, will take over some of
the authority formerly held by
the Student Organizations Board1
(SOB), a committee of SGC.
Council critics of the power
shift slammed the University
for forming the board without
consulting students. "It is sad'
that the administration wasa
blind to student input for so
long," stated Council member
Calvin Luker.
Meanwhile, the proposed:
$53,000 SGC budget for the com-
ing fiscal year was discussed
at length, with sharp criticism,
voiced by members of the Cam-'
pus Coalition (CC) party over
several appropriations. CC re-,
commended that $3,000 ear-,
marked for advertising and
public relations be reduced to
$2,000 with the remainder going
to community and academic
programs.
THE TREASURER will report
back with a revised budget next
week.
In other action, Council re-
versed a decision of the SOB
to evict the Black Prelawyers
from the group's office space
in the Union.;

ly well in terms of what it
was designed to do," says Met-
calf. Its advantages, he con-
tends, include flexibility of pur-
pose and low expense.
Metcalf maintains the com-
plaints are unwarranted. The
windows, he says, are immove-
able to save on security costs.
He describes the design room
as advantageous "for flexibility
of space, which is an attribute."
HE CLAIMS students have
sufficient personal space in the
big room and therefore don't
need a lounge. The noise level,
resulting from the hum of the
ventilation system, is an inten-
tional "acoustical perfume," ac-
cording to Metcalf. Its function,
he says, is to mask unwanted:
noise.
The dean blames the lack of
library space on the state,
which he says failed to pro-'
vide the, needed funds.
But teachers and students are
unconvinced of the building's
advantages. Prof. Feldt com-
plains of "dinky= offices"; an-
other professor who asked not
to be named compared the ex-
tremely narrow corridors to
"walking in Jackson Prison."
"THIS building is like a rup-
tured duck on ice skates," de-
clares teaching assistant Sam.
Vasich.
"The spaces in this building
don't interact, so the students
don't either," said an archi-
tecture student who asked- not
to be named. "The only place
to be together is the lounge,,
and that's difficult."
The architect-Robert Swan-
son of Swanson Associates, the
firm that built. several North
Campus structures-could not
be reached for comment on the
Arts and Architecture Building's
problems.
This vweek,
get Pioneer
stereo systems,
for o song..

(continued from Page 1) parties. Although no official en-
conducting door-to-door registra- dorsements h a v e b e e n an-
tion. Any' registered city voter nounced, both the Democrats
could become a deputy regis- and the Human Rights Party
trar by volunteering for the are sympathetic to the commit-
job. : tee. Some Republicans are also
IN ADDITION, the amend- involved in the effort, 'Baer
ment would free deputy regis- says.
trars from restraint by city of- The committee is subsidized
ficials. Ideally, voter registra- by Alice Lloyd dormitory dues,1
tion would be a non-partisan with approval from the dorm's
issue. appropriations committee.
The committee is trying to THE S I N G L E registration'
remain non-partisan by gather- site at the Union before this
ing the support of all three city month's election "was good, but

voter registration amendment

not good enough," Baer states.
"It was only open for four
hours a day for six days," he
points out. "This is hardly
adequate for nearly 40,000 peo-
ple on campus."
The committee needs the sig-
natures of 5,000 registered Ann
Arbor voters to get the issue on
the city's April ballot. The pe-
tition drive, beginning tomor-
row, will continue through next
week at the Fishbowl, in dorms,
and at o t h e r locations on
campus.

,gyip

pi

U' hit for anti-union' stand

Continued from Page 1) cent compensation increase for
violated no law during the 1975-76.x
unionization efforts in the past ALTHOUGH University offic-'
three months. ials have recommended a 13.2
Regent Lawrence Lindemer per cent increase to the Re-
(R - Stockbridge) declined to gents, who will vote on the pack-
comment on whether the Uni- age today, Hymans said the 18s
versity had been neutral to-Eper cent raise is "critical."
wards unionization, but pointed He said that the University's
out that "if Pierpont wanted to faculty salaries ranked thirty-

HYMANS SAID that it is im-
portant that the Regents ask
the state legislature for the 18
per cent increase because "the
state government cannot know
what you believe is truly need-{
ed if you fail to take the full
case to Lansing."
Regent Dean Baker (R-Ann
Arbor), however, argued thatj
an 18 per cent hike was "ir-
responsible" in view of cur-
rent economic conditions.

December PLAYBOY
in The Erotic World of Sa/vador Dali, the
world's foremost surrealist teams up with a
PLAYBOY photographer for a six-page nude
awakening. Garry Wills provides a more
straightforward view of international arbitrator
Henry Kissinger. And Arthur Knight gives you
the best view of all in Sex Stars of11974. Then,
Dan Greenburg casts a porno film, Hunter
Thompson attends a shark hunt, and Murray
Kempton eulogizes the late jazz master Duke
Ellington. It's all topped off in style by our
statuesque December Playmate, long and
lovely Janice Raymond.
, b on sale now!

be biased, he didn't succeed,
since the clericals voted pro-
union."
In another area, economics
Prof. Saul Hymans, chairman
of the Committee on the Eco-
nomic Status of the Faculty
(CESF), argued for an 18 per

fourth in the nation this year
as compared to seventeenth 10
years ago.
Without a large hike, he
claimed, it will be "difficult to
j maintain the quality of faculty
if other universities can out-
draw us."

"We are elected officials
charged with the responsibility
to look at how this will effect
the whole state, not just the
students and faculty," Baker

ONEG SHABBAT
sponsored by the
Association of Jewish Faculty and Grads
Israel-"October '73"
Before and After-An Open Forum
Friday, November 15-8 p.m.
HILLEL-1429 Hill St.

Admitting that the income The SOB had acted on com-
cutoff level in the current aid plaints that the organization
violated rules for use of Union
program tends to exclude many office space,
minority students, Goodman, Ron Palmerlee, speaking for
said, "We need an analysis of the Prelawyers, contended suc-
our system . . . I am not en- cessfully that the eviction vio-
couraged by our overall eco- lated the group's rights under
nomic picture." the All-Campus Constitution.
The results of a review of the
current financial aid system will
be presented to the Regents
next onth.Have a flair for
next month.f

said.
One helluva A,
musical!
Come see -AC
SOPH SHOW'S
j DAMN
YANKEES
J MENDELSSOHN
THEATRE
Nov. 14-16
8 p.m.
Advance tickets on sale at the
box office. For more info call
763-1107 or 763-1085
i.I

While the percentage of black
enrollment for this year de-
clined, enrollment for native-
Americans, Orientals and Span-
ish surname students increased
slightly. Total enrollment of
minority students now stands at
9.3 per cent.

orristr writineg
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or writing feature
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