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November 14, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-14

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WNW

Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, November 14, 1y7

Page Two THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Thursday, November 14, 1 97~

DEPARTMENT OF ROMANCE LANGUAGES
THE MEDEVIAL RENAISSANCE COLLUQUIUM
THE COMPARATIVE LITERATURE PROGRAM
present
Professor Paul Zumthor
of the University of Montreal
IN A LECTURE ON
"VERS UNE SEMIOLOGIE DE LA
CHANCON DE TROUVERES"

THURS., Nov. 14

4 p.m. Lec. Rm. 2.MLB

STUD
Temple University
A Commonwealth University.
Temple University's College of Liberal Arts offers excep-
tional study opportunity at its campus in the heart of Rome.
January 9 to May 9, 1975. Full credit courses taught by a
distinguished faculty.
Course offerings:
Anthropologys* Archaeology + Baroque Art and
Literature * Film - History * Italian Folklore -
Italian Language and Literature "- Philosophy -
Political Science " Renaissance Art and Literature .
Urban Studies - Independent Studies.
Contact: Mr. Der)nis L. Tarr, Dept. D, Temple University,
Philadelphia, PA 19122 (215) 787-8444

Staebler
files suit
(Continued from Page 1)
behavior to that of convicted
Watergate dirty trickster Don-
ald Segretti..
IN RESPONSE to' the accu-
sations, Cavanagh hit Staebler
and Rome with the original law-
suit filed last July. That case
is still pending in Wayne Coun-
ty Circuit Court, and Staebler's
attorney has moved to have it
transferred to the Washtenaw
Circuit Court.
Staebler's lawsuit holds that
Cavanagh "knew the statements
themselves were false and/or he
made such statements withl
reckless disregard as to their
truth or falsity."
Staebler also contends that
Cavanagh made the statements
in an effort to attract attention
to his race for the Demdcratic
gubernatorial nomination.
CAVANAGH last night said he
is "amused" by Staebler's law-
suit. "There's a considerable
difference between what my po-
sition was and what his position
is now," he commented.
"His lawsuit," Cavanagh add-
ed, "is sort of a smokescreen,
I would think."
Staebler interpreted Cava-
nagh's comment as "splitting
hairs. I don't even see what
he's talking about."
Commenting on the possibility
that this lawsuit battle between
two Democrats might hurt the
party Staebler remarked, "I
never regard fights as being a
good thing. But I think this is
such a specific question of fact
that I don't see it doing damage
to the party."

(Continued from Page 1)
berg, will resume his testimony
today.
Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.)
asked Rockefeller a series of
pointed questions about the de-
lay in admitting it was he who
arranged financing for the
book.
"THIS IS a throwback to what
we've seen over the last two
years,"Byrd. began, only to be
interrupted by Rockefeller's "I
object."
"The facts came out piece-
meal, either one step ahead or

Rocky denies book cover-upj

one step behind their coming
out independently," Byrd con-
tinued. "That's the throwback.
This is what troubles me and
should be troubling the Ameri-
can public after what we've
gone through the last two years.
"This is reminiscent . . of
the dirty tricks of the Nixon
campaign . . . and the cover-
ups, in a manner, were at least
reminiscent of the things we
have gone through the last two
years," Byrd said.

peated there was no effort to
cover-up his role in getting the
book published and said he ex-
plained the details of his in-
volvement at the first oppor-
tunity-after he had pieced to-
gether the background.
Byrd said Rockefeller had the
opportunity to face the issue in
September, when the committee
first opened hearings on the
nomination.
"I didn't have the information
then," Rockefeller shot back.
"And I repeat that under oath."

ROCKEFELLER

r e-I

CommonCause head keeps job

(Continued from Page 1)
cause a letter he wrote U.S.
Congressman Marvin Esch (R-
Ann Arbor) on Common Cause
stationary was used as a politi-
cal advertisement.
The advertisement gave the
impression that Common Cause
had endorsed Esch's re-election,
Common Cause Executive Vice
President David Cohen said on
November 2. He later added
that Hathaway's actions-in
writing the letter-violated the
organization's rules prohibiting
involvement in partisan poli-
tics and that as a result Hatha-
way would be asked "to step
aside" as co-ordinator.
COMMON CAUSE is a nation-

al citizens' lobby which lends
support to legislation it believes
to be in the public interest. The
group, however, never backs
particular candidates for office.
Cohen said yesterday that the
decision reached by the local
Common Cause chapter ,is
"highly satisfactory and the
matter is now closed as far as
we are concerned."
Although admitting the inci-
dent involving his letter has
injured Common Cause, Hatha-
way said yesterday that he has
received support from the local
group and is looking forward
to continuing as co-ordinator.
COMMON CAUSE members,
including Hathaway and Ren-
nels, believe that the circum-

Arafat addresses U.N.

stances under which the letter
was sent to Esch remain con-
fusing and unresolved.
"There is no way of knowing
exactly what happened because
the procedures were blurred,"
Rennels said.
Rennels also said Esch will
be informed that Common Cause
is angry that he used the Hatha-
way letter in a paid political ad-
vertisement and continued to
run the ad after the organization
asked that it be discontinued.
IN THE election, Esch de-
feated Democratic Party can-
didate John Reuther to earn a
fifth consecutive term in the
House. On November 1, the
Esch campaign unveiled an ad-
vertisement which reproduced
a letter from Hathaway, dated
two weeks earlier, praising the
Congressman's support of Com-
mon Cause legislation on cam-
paign finance reform.
Hathaway, a longtime Repub-
lican who served as a GOP
member of City Council in the
mid-sixties, said the national
office authorized the letter.
Common Cause normally in-
forms local groups to send let-
ters of thanks to legislators
backing its measures when they
are considered.
Congress voted on the cam-
paign reform law in August.
"The problems with the, letter
were it fullsomeness (sic) of
praise and the date," Rennels
said yesterday.

Sirica namnes
hree doctors o
examine Nixon
WASHINGTON (P)-U.S. District Judge John Sirica appointed
a panel of three doctors yesterday to examine former President
Richard Nixon and determine if he is able to testify in the
Watergate cover-up trial.
Sirica signed an order in which he authorized and directe
the doctors "to conduct such examination as they deem necessar
and appropriate and, thereafter, to advise the court:
-"1: Whether Mr. Nixon is presently able to travel to Wash
ington and testify as a witness . .
-"2: If not, when, in their opinion, Mr. Nixon would be able
to so appear and testify;
-"3: Whether Mr. Nixon is able to appear and testify at
site near his home;
-"4: If not, when, in their opinion, Mr. Nixon would be able
to so appear and testify;
-"5: Whether, if Mr. Nixon
is not now able to appear and
testify in this case, either in s
Washington or a site near his
home, he is able to be deposed
by the parties in this case;
-"6: If Mr. Nixon is not
physically able at the present (Continued from Page 1)
time to give a deposition, when, issues as soon as possible.T
in their opinion, he would be save time, we want to hack ou
able to give such a deposition; language right over the table
-"7: If Nixon is physically The University has refused t
able to submit to a deposition, do that kind of bargaining."
the conditions under which such Union members were strongl
deposition should be taken in urged to attend future bargain
order to avoid serious risk of ing sessions. Hoyman said-t
injury to his health"Iloud applause-"The Universit
S acts a lot differently when
Nixon will leave the hospital union members are sitting ihr
today, it was announced last glaring at them."
night. See story, Page 3. The union also pla ned
______________________ strong drive to recruit ne
THE THREE doctors named members.
were Charles Hufnagel, of Wash- MEMBERS OF the GEO
ington, the chairman: John Executive Committee objected
Spittell, of the Mayo Clinic of strongly to the University's re
Rochester, Minn., and Richard jection of most of their eco
Ross of Baltimore. nomic and non-econmic de
All are specialists in cardio- mands. In particular, they at
vascular disorders. tacked the University for re
Sirica described them to news- jecting their demand of -an av
men as "three of the outstand- erage 25 per cent pay hike anc
ing doctors in the country.,, oroposing a raise which they
i have already been guaranteed
SIRICA directed the doctors "Basically they offered less
to report their findings either than they did last year when
on an interim or final basis by they tried to buy us off," said
Nov 29. t GEO treasurer Bob Kushler
The judge signed his order' 'They offered the same8 pet
after a day in which a formert cent we'e supposed to be get
New York police detective and tine already," he added.
a Mississippi oil man testified at Union president Roger Giu
the Watergate cover-up trial dici objected to the University'e
about their role in the attempt refsing the GEO demand for
to contain the investigation of an agency shop. This proposa
the Watergate break-in. would guarantee that every
Sirica also filed an affidavit Graduate emloye pay a service
from Herbert Miller, Jr., Nix- fee to the GEO whether a union
on's attorney, who said he talk- member or not, as they also
ed to Dr. John Lungren, the benefit from any contract which
physician who has been treat- is reached.
ing Nixon for phlebitis in Cali- At the next bargaining session
fornia, and that Lungren re- tomorrow, GEO will present its
ported the former President is new economic package. The
suffering from hypertension two sides are also likely to con
"seemingly stimulated by both sider GEO's non-economic pro
physical and nonphysical ef- posals on fringe benefits an
fort." 'job security.

Join The Daily
DECEMBER
GRADUATE?
If you are graduating
in December you must
or d er your CAP &
GOWN no later than
NOV. 19 at
UNIVERSITY CELLAR
769-7940

(Continued from Page 1)
come to the General Assembly
certain that It would do their
bidding" and said:
"Israel will not permit the
establishment of PLO authority
in any part of Palestine. The
PLO will not be forced on the
Palestinian Arabs."
Israel's seats were empty
during Arafat's speech, given in
Arabic. and interrupted seven
times by applause. China, Cuba
and the Arab delegations boy-
cotted Tekoah's reply.
IN LEBANON, men, women

and children in Palestinian re-
fugee camps huddled around
wireless sets tuned to the Ku-
wait radio broadcast of the Ara-
fat speech.
After the speech, many em-
braced, performed Palestinian
and Arab dances and in many
camps fired tracer bullets from
submachine guns into the air.
THE ISRAEL command said
Arabs presumed to be Pales-
tinians fired rockets from Leba-
non into two Israeli border
towns about two hours after the
Arafat speech.

NNW, ..
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
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______________________ _ -T__ ill

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Ir

BONNE BELL
MAKE-VP DMNTRTO
esented by Pam Griesbach and Christie Stuart,
U. of Michigan College Board Members

1
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You are cordially invited to a Br-f - Bell Make-up
Demonstration at V i I I a g - Ap'othecary. Pam and
Christie will be your qualified demonstrators and
they will be happy to answer any of your questions.
DATE: Thurs., Nov. 14, 1974
TIME: 1 p.m.-4 p.m.

Day Calendar
Thursday, November 14
WUOM: Live coverage cont., Sen-
ate Rules & Administration Com-
mittee hearings on confirmation of'
Nelson Rockefeller as v-p., 10 am.
Ctr. Japanese Studies: Bradford
S *cock, Miami 'U.,OH.. "Aging
and Retirement in Japan,"Co-
'rnons Rm., Lane Hall, noon.
Pendleton Arts Information Ctr.:
Open hearth, poetry reading, Kerry
Thomas, Zombie Haiku selections,
Pendleton Ctr., Union, noon.
Regents' Meeting: 2 pm; public
comments, 4"pm.
Opportunity Program 10th An-
niversary Celebration: Union Ball-
room, 3-6 pm.
Low Energy Seminar: P.M. Platz-
man, Bell Telephone, lecture 3, "In-I
elastic X-ray Scattering: A new.
Old Tool in Solid State Physics,
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Our research service is sold
for research assistance only

P&A Coiloq. Em., 3 pm. of Rochester, "Alpha Transfer to
Medical School: Film, Acupunc- Nuclei s-d Shell via the (Li6, d)
ture Anesthesia in the People's Rik-; Reaction," P&A Colloq., 4 pm.
public of China, Kenneth L. Cesey, Geol., . Mineralogy: David M.
Dow Aud., Towsley Ctr., 3:30, 7:30 Raup, U. of Rochester, "Stochastic
pm. Models of Phylogeny," 1528 CC Lit-
MURI: James Olds, Cal. Inst. of tie, 4 pm.
Tech., "Recent Advances in BrainJAtmospheric,UOceanic Seminar:
Studies of Motivation," 1057 MERt, John M. Lewis, U. of Illinois, "Large
3:45 pm. Scale Influences on Mid Latitude
Mathematics: 1974 Ziwet Lectures, Convective Storms," 4073 E. Eng., 4
David Mumford, Harvard, "The pm.
Schottky Problem," 3201 Angell, 4 Int'l Night: Food from Carribean
pmi. Islands, League Cafeteria, 5-7:15
Ctr. Japanese Studies: Bradford upm.
Simcock, "Environmental Politics Guild House: Jane Kenyon, Jouce
in Japan," Commons Rm., Lane Peseroff, poetry reading, 802 Mon-
Hall, 4 pm.-roe. 7:30 pm.
Romance Lang.; Medieval Renais- Music School: Terry Smith, per-
sance Collegium; Comparative Lit.: cussion, Recital Hall, 8 pm.
Paul Zumthor, U. of Montreal,
"hers Une Semilogie de Ia Chanson women Studies: Natalie Zemon
des Trouveres," Lec. Rm. 2, MLB, I Davis, U. of Cal., Berkeley, "Women
4 ,pm.i or, Top: Symbolic Sexual Inversion
Ctr. Early Childhood Develop- and Political Dissent in Early Mod-
ment, Education: Jerome Kagan, ern Europe," Rackham Assembly
Harvard, "Cognitive Development in Hall, 8 pm.; films, Anything You
the First Three Years," Schorling Want to Be; Emerging Women,
Aud., SEB, 4 pm. Aud. C, Angell, 8 pm.
Economics: Marc Neriove, North- PTP: Showcase Series, "The Red
western U., "Population and Eco- Lantern," Trueblood Aud., Frieze,
nomic Growth: Perspectives on the 8 pm.
New Home Economics." UAC's Soph Show: "Damn Yan-
Nuclear Seminar: H. E. Gave, U kees," Mendelssohn, 8 pm.

________________________________________________'f
at

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S1.12 S. University
API'ca i*

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Coal pact reached

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663-5533

(Continued from Page 1)
tionships in an industry so criti-
cal to the nation's future."
The union said it won a large
package of benefits, including
five days' sick pay, a near
doubling of industry contribu-
tions to the miners' pension
fund, cost-of-living increases
and its first sickness and acci-
dent protection plan.
The union also won major
concessions that it said would
improve mine safety - the is-
sue which Miller had termed
his number one priority.
THE NEW contract would
guarantee individual miners the

right to leave an unsafe work
area, provide for four com-
pany-paid safety inspections a
year as well as safety training
and would guarantee access to
mines by union safety officials.
The union said the wage pack-
age and cost-of-living increase,
based on current inflation rates,
would raise daily pay rates of a
miner now earning $50 a day to
$65.66 per day at the end of
the proposed three-year con-
tract.
A miner at the lowest wage
rate, currently $42 a day, would
receive $57.28 under the con-
tract, the UMW said.

POSITIONS NOW OPEN
CENTRAL

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STUDENT JUDICIARY
ALL-CAMPUS SUPREME COURT
WHO CAN APPLY?
Any student at the University
WHERE TO APPLY?
Room 3X Michigan Union
WHEN TO APPLY?
Before Monday, Nov. 18, 1974, 4:30 p.m.
HOW TO APPLY?'
Just fill out a CSJ prospective candidate's
form and sign up for an interview
WHAT IS NEEDED?
Clear logical thought is the only requirement

''I

BURSLEY HALL ENTERPRISES
presents
CHARLIE CHAPLIN'S
THE GOLD RUSH
PLUS
A Buster Keaton Short

__ _

Fri., Nov. 15
(contrary to University Record)
Bursley W. Cafe
Must present U-M l.D. for admission

11.

9:00 p.m.
Adm. $1.00

Held Over for the 116th Straight Week
THE
RFD BOYS
FINEST IN BLUEGRASS MUSIC
at the
PRETZEL BELL
THURSDAY-9:30

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