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November 10, 1974 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-10

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 10, 1974

Page Eig h tTHE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, November 10, 1974

tate

stuns

1uci e es,

16- 3

(Continued from Page 1)
headquarters at the nearby Kel-
log Center, where he then tele-
phoned them for consultation.
The bizarre scene continued
when Buckeye mentor Woody
Hayes emerged calmly from
the OSU dressing room and
confidently predicted vindica-
tion for his Bucks. Apparently
mildly upset with the "over-I
sight" of the officials, Hayes
said, "One referee thought the
quarterback had the ball. He
didn't see Baschnagel dive into
the end zone. But the official
next to him did and put his
hands up.l
"My players tell me there
were two seconds left. The re-
ferees should have called a
time out. They (MSU) lied on
top, so the clock should have
been stopped to let us run a
play," Hayes said.t
THEN THE HORDE of re-l
porters crushed into Spartan
Coach Denny Stolz's locker-
room to hear Stolz proclaim
"I am the winning coach!" tol
the confusion of all those pre-
sent, since nothing was clear l
at that point.
Stolz praised his Spartans,
now 5-3-1 on the year, and re-
veled in his weird moment of
glory. "I've never seen a finer1
performance by a Michigan
State team. Just tremendous."
Moments later, it finally be-1
came clear the Spartans had
won. Emerging from phonel
consultation, Duke had his ans-
wer and was ready to tell Chris

SUNDAY SPOUTS
NIGHT EDITORS:
BRIAN DEMING FRED UPTON

Minnesota to a 24-20 Big Tenj
football upset of Purdue yester-
day.
It was the first victory ever
for Minnesota at West Lafay-
ette in nine tries and raised
the Gophers' season record to
4-5 overall and 2-4 in confer-
ence play.
Badgers fly
IOWA CITY, (P) - Junior
Bill Marek shredded Iowa's de-
fense for 206 yards, including
170 in the second half, and
scored four touchdowns yester-
day to power Wisconsin to a 28-
15 Big Ten Conference football
victory over Iowa.
Bucks shot

i

Bag Ten
StondingS
Conference Games
W L T PF PA

Schenkel and everyone else the}
verdict. With a trail of report-
ers rivaling Henry Kissinger's,
Duke made his way to the press
box for his statement.
THE MAIN uncertainty was1
why one official had indicatedI
touchdown while the others did
not. Duke explained the call. '
"It was ruled by the back,
judge and the field judge that
time had expired before the+
last play. The line judge ruled1
touchdown."
In other words, the line judge
was performing his function by!
signalling for the score because+
his responsibility did not em-
brace the game clock.
UNFORTUNATELY, the craz-
iness of the post-game activities
may have taken something
away from the magnitude of
the Spartan victory.
Labels of invincibility had
been hung on the Buckeyes, but
the Spartans showed that they
may be the coming power in the
Big Ten.
MSU has defeated Ohio State,
in three of the last four yearsI

and, long touchdown strikes not-
withstanding, MSU did it with
its defense.
The Buckeyes garnered 377;
yards, but the Spartans were
tough in the vicinity of their
goal line. The Bucks settled
for short field goals twice, and
Tom Klaban's third attempt
was wide.
THE SPARTANS had numer-
ous chances to score in the first
half, but the teams were dead-
locked, 3-3, after thirty min-
utes. MSU split receiver Mike
Hurd dropped a Baggett bomb
early in the game, and the
Spartans couldn't move after
an OSU fumble.
Ohio State had the opportun-
ity to break openathe struggle
in the second half but could
only manage ten points before
the Spartans' eleventh hour
heroics.
Gophers roar
WEST LAFAYETTE {A') - A
three touchdown scoring surge
in the first half and a late field
goal by Steve Goldberg pushed

MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Mich. State
Wisconsin
Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Purdue
Northwestern
Indiana

6
.5
4
3
2
2
2
2
2
1

0
1
1
3
3
4
4
4
4
5

0
0
1
0
1
0
0
0
0
0

153
252
144
139
89
102
82
133
95
97

47
65
90
158
121
135
175
140
197
148

Ohio State
Michigan State
OSU-Klaban;
MSU-Nielsen
OSU-Klaban
OSU-Henson
kick

3 0 3 7-13.
0 3 0 13-16
22-yd. F.G.
39-yd. F.G.
20-yd. F.G.
1-yd run, Klaban

MSU-Jones 44-yd. pass from
Baggett (two-point conversion fail-
ed)
MSU-Jackson 88-yd run Nielsen
kick
A-78,533

BULLETIN
The Michigan hockey team
lost 5-3 last night to the Den-
ver Pioneers, ending up on
the short end of a weekend
series sweep. This game fol-
lowed a similar pattern to
the first one, with Michigan
failing behind to an early 2-0
d~eficit.
The Wolverines pulled to
within one goal at the end of
the first Period on an un-
Pssisted effort by Angie Mo-
rntto, to make the score 2-1.
In the second period fresh-
m, n Bill Thayer tied up the
gTmg - t 2-2. But the Pioneers
cm'me right back, scoring a
third goal to make it 3-2.
In the fi-al period, Moret-
to s-ored his second goal,
but it wasn't enough.

Daily Photo by KEN HNK
MICHIGAN STATE WIDE SAFETY Tom Han non (45) leaps high into the air to pick off an
overthrown pass by Cornelius Greene, late in the second quarter. Hannon was covering wide
receiver Dave Hazel (82) on the long home run toss, when he made his perfectly timed
stretch to beat Hazel to the ball.

First downs
Rushes - yards
Passing yards
Return yards
Passes
Punts
Fumbles - lost
Penalties - yards

osU
19
63-333
44
26
3-11-1
4-49
2-2
1-5

MSU
12
43-230
98
26
5-13-0
7-39
2-1
2-10

1-Jhe &WIuJUJ y7?Ia3
A death in the morning . .
... decided the game

oiverines

walow

y

11 lini

KContinued from Page 1 The next time Illinois had the
John Kaher---® HOLLENBACH went right ball it drove to the Michigan
CHAMPAIGN-URBANA back to Smalzer in the endzone, three, Hollenbach dropped back
but Smalzer stepped just over to throw on fourth down, and
JT MAY BE crude to state it this way, but a shooting at an the end line before hauling in Wolverine defensive tackle Jeff
Illinois fraternity house may have won a game for Michigan the pass. Perlinger harrassed him into
yesterday. Michigan's Dave Brown bat- throwing the ball away.
Illini defensive end Greg Williams was attending a dance put ted down Hollenbach's second Michigan's only second half
on by his Kappa Alpha Psi brothers Friday night. Because of down aerial at the two, and drive began on its own one after
an injured ankle, he was not locked up with the rest of ther Don Dufek did the same on an Illinois punt and ended on
Illinois team, and was not scheduled to play yesterday. third down at the three. the Illinois 21 where Bell fum-
According to police reports, four non-students tried to enter Jilek' atoned for his interfer- bled.
the dance without paying, and an argument broke out. One of ence penalty, tipping a fourth Bell rushed for 148 yards in
the gate crashers started shooting, police said. down pass intended for Tracy 19 carries, playing only half the
Campbell beyond his reach game. He personally accounted
Williams, who had taken no part in the original argument, with 37 seconds to play. for 60 of the Wolverines' 70
was shot in the forehead. He died early yesterday morning in "THIS WAS one of four games yars in that third quarter
the Champaign hospital. wewrponigf sada;rv.
"I now realize just how unimportant a football game is when we were ponig for asaid' orive.
comare toa oun ma'slif," llni oac Bb Backanhappy Michigan coach Bo1 For the rest of the half,
compared to a young man's life," Ili coach Bob Blackman Schembechler. "We knew we'd Michigan was held inside its

said softly after his team had been beaten 14-6 by Michigan. have a tough time.
Blackman, who entered the press room with tears in his "There's an advantage to hav-
eyes, described the emotional wringer he had gone through in ing tough games like this," he
the preceding hours. continued. "A team that never
"I told the coaches Greg had been shot, but I did not has a - close game doesn't know
tell the team. Just as we were about to leave Allerton House how to handle the pressure.
(where the Illini spend their Friday nights before home We're learning a lot from these
games) I got the word that Greg was dead. close games."
"When we got to the dressing rooms, I told the team that The Wolverines stopped Illi-
Greg was dead. Nobody spoke a word after that, not before the nois two other times on downs
game, not during the game and not at halftime." in Michigan territory in the sec-
One would have to be an unfeeling stone to concentrate on a nd he (Illinois) didn't start
football game after hearing that a teammate and close friend hitting until the second half,"
had been killed. At the news of Greg Williams' death, the Illinois said Michigan linebacker Carl
football team went into a deep state of shock. Russ.
Taking the field against Michigan in the first half, the Illinois safety Jim Stauner
Illini could do nothing right. At 1:15 of the second period, intercepted Franklin's only
they picked up their initial first down. Michigan had already pass of the second half at
racked up sixteen. Michigan's 42 and returned
"Our players were so shocked they couldn't play football,", it to the 25. Then,. on fourth
said Blackman. "But you have to give them an awful lot of and 13 at the 17, Hollenbach
credit for coming back as well as they did in the second half." hit Frank Johnson at the
"Before last night, I thought this would have been our most eight, but Dufek nailed him
"Befre lst nghtshort of the first down.
important game," whispered Blackman. "I was proud of the ss
way our guys had come off that beating in Ohio, and all the
injuries we've had. I liked our attitude, and I thought we could
pull off the upset."
The Michigan team heard the news of Greg Williams'
death from the radio in the taping room. Bo Schembechler
was told by his team at the pre-game meeting.
Though nobody knew Williams personally, the macabre un-
reality of having to play a football game hours after a player's
death affected the performers deeply. Tourists in the lobby of
the Ramada Inn remarked about how grim the team looked as
it headed to the buses that would go to Memorial Stadium.
Aside from "our kids really felt bad," Bo Schembechler:
would not comment much on Williams' death after the game.
Bo had more immediate problems for his concern.m
Gordon Bell excepted, the play of the Michigan offense,
yesterday can only be termed incompetent. Bo will un-
doubtedly have many unkind words to say about the dropped
passes, the missed blocking assignments and the untimely
penalties that prevented Illinois from being blown out of the
stadium in the first half.
"Our defense came together today, all 22 of us," claimed
Larry "Bocco" Banks. "The offense was -ing up, but we pulled
this game out."
But the defense too had its bad moments in the second half. ,
And the more one looks at it, the more one feels that if Greg
Williams were alive today, Michigan would be 8-1.
Wolverines look good-on paper

own 31 yard line, checked by
an aroused Illinois defense.
Michigan went right to work
offensively in the first half,
grinding out a 92-yard 12-play
touchdown drive after the open-
ing kickoff.
Bell and Franklin traded big
gainers in the drive, which cul-
minated with a 9-yard Bell dash
around left end.
Franklin set up his own
one-yard score in the second
quarter by hitting wingback
Gil Chapman all alone on a
post pattern for a 25 yard
gain on a third and 19.
Heater banged up the middle
for 10 more and a first down at
the Illinois 22 on the next plhy.
Then Franklin took over, carry-
ing on four of the next six plays
to finish the touchdown drive.
Michigan's defense held Pli-

nois at bay throughout the first
half, allowing the Illini just one
first down with only 1:15 re-
maining.
Dropped passes and penal-
ties squandered other Wolver-
ine scoring chances. A clip-
ping penalty nullified a 40-
yard Dave Brown punt return
to the Illinois 26, setting Mi(h-
igan all the way back to its
own 21.
Franklin again found Chap-
man all alone over the middle
for 48 yards to the Illini 15, but
a holding penalty set Micnigan
back 15 yards. MikegLantry
tried a 44-yard field goal, but
missed wide to the left.
The Wolverines got another
chance with less than a minute
and a half to go until intermis-
sion when Tom Drake inter-
cepted a Hollenbach pass and
returned it 10 yards to the Illi-
nois 48.
Jim Smith had Illinois de-
fender Mike Gow beaten on a
fly pattern, but Franklin's pass
fell just off his fingertips. The
Illini blitzed all three lineback-
ers on the next play, and Frank-
lin was dumped for a 20-yard
loss, ending the half.
"We've g o t momentum,"
Schembechler affirmed. 'I
call momentum going from
5-0 to 6-0 and on to 10 and
11-0."
The Wolverines have just two
opponents, Purdue and Ohio
State, standing between them
and that 11-0 season, a third
consecutive Big Ten champion-
ship, a Rose Bowl bid and a
possible national title.

AP Photo
MICHIGAN QUARTERBACK Dennis Franklin (9) escapes the defensive penetration of Illini's
Roy Robinson just in time, as he gets this lateral off in the direction of tailback Gordon
Bell. Franklin was instrumental in guiding the Wolverines on two long touchdown drives in
the first half and these proved to be the margin of victory.

MEYER PACES WIN

Harriers I
By ANDY GLAZER
The Michigan Cross Country team, buoyed by a cheering
home crowd, finished man for man ahead of favored Wisconsin
and won the 60th Annual Big Ten Cross Country Championship
yesterday at the Michigan Golf Course.
SOPHOMORE GREG MEYER, who finished tenth in last year's
championships, paced the Wolverines in the six mile race by
finishing second. Meyer finished behind last year's champion,
Craig Virgin of Illinois. Virgin's ti-me was 29:11.3.
Meyer had trailed Michigan State's Herb Lindsay for much
of the race, but pulled out in front in the last two miles.
"Lindsay tried something that was out of his reach," said
Meyer. "He went after Virgin the first few miles and wore
himself out. I went out easier, was fifth after two miles, and
then just ran my best."
..MICHIGAN'S NEXT FINISHER was surprising freshman Bill
Donakowski, who placed sixth. His performance, along with
that of fellow freshman Mike McGuire (who finished eighth),
was lauded by another 'freshman', first year coach Ron War-
hurst.
"I was just so proud of the way Donakowski and McGuire ran
today. Of course, I'm proud of everyone, but to do this well as
freshmen is tremendous."
Next for the Wolverines was senior Keith Brown, 'who finished
twelfth. Brown, who has been troubled by an injury to his rightE
heel, had said earlier in the week that "it'll be an upset if we
lose." Brown then mentioned the difficulty of learning the Mich-

ike crown
from each counting in the scoring. Jon Cross removed all doubt
of a Wolverine win by finishing 14th, ahead of Wisconsin's fourth
and fifth men.
If Cross had faltered, Jay Ansaett's finish (22nd) still would
have given Michigan the win, but by a much narrower margin.
Warhurst, who may have been the most nervous man in Ann
Arbor the past few days, was jubiliant in victory. "We haven't
been able to get into the (national) rankings because we were
picked to finish fourth in the Big Ten in pre-season." He
smiled. "After today people will start believing."
All the runners concurred in their praise of Warhurst. "Ron
convinced me I was fit," said Meyer, "and that was a big part
of doing well."
"You've got to give credit to the coach," said Bill Donakowski,
"he did a great job."
The win was the Wolverines first team championship in 20
years.

MICHIGAN 7 7 0 0-I4
Illinois 0 0 0 6-- 6 Shultz
Phillips
Mich-Bell 9-yd. run (Lantry kick) Campbell
Mich-Franklin 1 yd. run (Lantry Johnson
Lick) Konatz
1i-Gow 45 yd. punt return (Run Hollenbach
failed)

ILLINOIS
7 36
9 29
8 .9
1 3
3 12
6 --3
PASSING
MICHIGAN
att. com int
14 5 1
ILLI.NOIS~

5.1
3.2
10
30
-.7
yds
113

1-Michiga
2-Wiscons
3-Illinois
4-MSU
5-Minnes

Michigan: Big Ten Champs
TEAM RESULTS
Points 6-Ohio State
an 42 7-Indiana
sin 55 8-Purdue
75 9-Northwestern
84 10-Iowa

151
157
226
237
283

ota

120

ILL.
First downs 12
Rushing (att/yds) 34-101

MICH.
22
59-286

Franklin

1 A.. L t '.

I

............

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