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November 10, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-10

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, November 10, 1974

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sunday, November 10, 1974

F .
Economics-Law School Seminar
* JANE WATERSON, assistant dean
of law school, in charge of admissions,
will speak on admission requirements
and answer questions.
* JIM ADAMS, professor of eco-
nomics, will speak on economics majors
and law school.
."12, p.m., Aud. F, P&A Bldg.
Sponsored by Michigan Undergraduate Economics Association

Weinberger won't
reveal HEW plan

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(Continued from Page 1)
ald Reagan and former director'
of the Office of Management
and Budget in the Nixon White
1House, first unveiled in a tele-
vision appearance Oct. 6 his
estimates of how much HEW
spending could be eliminated.i
"I think we could probably
reduce programs that we think1
are not serving the public, and
certainly aren't serving the
poor and the handicapped and
the needy in the way they
should, bysomewhere in the
range of maybe $3 to $4 billion
dollars, but not much morej
than that."
FORD HAS twice prodded hisj
Cabinet publicly to come upI
with at least $5.4 billion in cuts
to meet his goal of a $300 bil-

ALSO COMING UP:

lion federal budget this fiscal
year. He indicated that failure
of Cabinet officers to respond
adequately to the budget-cut-
ting effort might invite their
dismissal.
Weinberger has repeatedly
denied reports that he soon will
be replaced, although the va-
riety of names mentioned as
possible successors has led po-
litical observers to believe they
were trial balloons floated by
the White House.
Unlike some other Nixon hold-
overs in the Ford cabinet, he
has not been shy in attacking
his department's $111 billion
budget.
ACCOUNTING FOR more
than one-third of the total fed-
eral budget - and the largest
single chunk - HEW would
seem ripe for slashes to meet
Ford's goals.
In transmitting the delegates
report to the President, Wein-
berger said the recommenda-
tions "obviously do not repre-
sent the views of the depart-
ment" nor necessarily the
views of Congress.

Seminar on Job Opportunities for Economics Majors
Nov. 20, 7:30 p.m., Room 25, Angell Hall
Co-sponsored with Career Planninq and Placement

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Spanish activists to
spea at East Quad
By DAVID WEINBERG
Three members of the Spanish resistance will discuss their
vision of a "Third Republic" for Spain in East Quad's Rm. 1261
tonight at 8 p.m.
The speakers, whose names have not been announced for
security reasons; are on national tour to inform the public of
political changes in Spain over the last year.
TOPICS OF discussion will include the illegal trade union
movement, dictator Francisco Franco's political prisoners, stu-
dents' and women's movements in Spain and Basque-Catalon
struggles for autonomy.
"I don't think they (the speakers) would have come a year
ago," said Residential College anthropology Prof. Susan Hard-
ing, who did graduate research in Spain. She cited several
major changes which she says have altered the prospects of
Spain's future.
She listed the assassination of former premier Carrero
Blanco, Portugal's recent coup and Franco's illness over the
summer foremost in the reason for the altered prospects.
HARDING ADDED that labor strikes in Spain are on the
increase - and it is the illegal workers' commissions who do
most of the negotiating and not the official labor union.
According to Harding, the Spanish economy has not fared
poorly under Franco.
"Many people living in the countryside honestly believe that
Franco has brought them peace and prosperity," said Harding.
"And what has happened is somewhat of a miracle in terms of
increased prosperity. But it's got more to do with the growth of
the world as a whole," she said.
MEANWHILE, according to Harding, much American money
has found its way to Spain. In addition to $400 million in military
installations and $1 billion in U.S. business interests, the CIA is
also pouring men and money into Spain.
According to a CBS Weekend Newsreport dated Oct. 12, the
CIA believes that Spain "will be the center of the next interna-
tional crisis."
Said Harding, "They don't want another Portugal in Spain.
But we must recognize from Vietnam that pressure can be put
on the government to cut military spending."
YOU CAN HELP THE RETARDED k
Benefit Spaghetti Dinner
S.D.T. SORORITY
1405 Hillj
5-8 p.m.
SUNDAY, NOV. 10
$1.75 donation

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TALKS CONTINUE:
i-
Coal strike looms
(Continued from Page 1) thirsting for coal, the compan-
ing out." Miller, who has begn ies are selling it faster than
i less optimistic than Farmer in they can produce it and are
recent days, said that was an reaping record profits. Coal,
assessment he would have io which sold for $8 to $10 a ton
make when the time came. Ia year ago, now brings more
The negotiations have taken'market
place in a guarded second-floor mrke
htelroo. Oer lyapas fn.r M i n ers currently average
hotel room. Over the past four about $45 a day, a rate compar-
days, they have been marked able with auto and steel workers
by a flurry of proposals nd but Miller has said that his
counterproposals and long re' members have failed to keep
cesses as they slowly narrow pace with advances in other
differences toward an agree- areas and that now is the time
ment. to catch up.
! The current UMW contract "Years ago, the coal miners'
runs until midnight tomorrow union brothers and sisters in
but union and industry officials the auto, steel, chemical and
expect few miners to return to rubber industries got their feet
work for only one day after the in the door with such contract
weekend. gains as cost-of-living protec-
tion, extended vacations, sick
IN ADDITION, tomorrow is pay and pensions, supplemental
Veterans Day, a holiday underunemployment a n d severance
the union contract, and the com- pay, and limits on involuntary
panies would have to pay triple- overtime-and each succeeding
time wages. contract opened the door a little
The contract talks have been further," Miller said at the start
under way since Sept. 3 and the of bargaining.
union anparently has won some
major concessions from the coal "BUT NOT the coal miner,"
operators. he contirn"ed. "He won a few
-eaosmore dollars on the hour, an
Both sides indicate the final extra holiday or two, and soap
settlement will range in the in the hathhouse.
neighborhood of a 40 ner :ent "Now it's 1974 and it's far
in wages and benefits in a new too late just to onen the door
three-year contract. a crack. For coal miners it's
time to onen the door wide and
WITH THE nation once agiin ! walk on through."
DAILY OFFICIAL BUIUJETIN
Career Planning & Placement uidles to accompany an official
3200 SAB, 764-7456 U.S. Government Exhibition at the
Recruiting on Campus: Mon., International Ocean Exhibition
Nov. 11: Notre Dame & Oak Ridge held in Okinawa. (6/mos. beginning
at'l Lab.; Tues., Nov. 12, Amer. July 1975) Phone: 764-7456 to make
Grad. Sch.; Tus., Stanford U./Bus., an appt.
Chemical Abstracts Serv., & Nat'i summer Placement
Security Agency; Wed., Nov. 13: 3200S sAB, 763-4117
Hayes Albion, HEW/Mgt. InternI Amer. Dental Assoc., Chicago, IL
Prog.; Thurs., Nov. 14: Libby- announces summer dental research
Owens-Ford Co., NCR.Wallace Bus.program for biol., chem., physics &
Forms, Inc., Ctr. Naval Analyses & health science students; CIA, Ar-
U. of Kentucky/Hosp.; Fri., Nov.-s
15: Yale U.; Mon., Nov. 18: U of lington, VA, openings for students
Penn/Grad Sch. of Arts & Sci.in foreign studies research: B.A.
Tues., Nov. 19: Metropolitan Life, rediired, one year grad. study pre-
U-M-Dearborn/MM Program, Bat- f d details available.
telle Northwest, IRS, & Howard L. National Park Concessions. Man-
Green & Assocs.; Wed., Nov. 20: motCe KY picpatks now
Electronic Data Systems, Inst. Para-accepted on specific parks; dead-
laol Ivani~+ '11 ^11n1K !nrn Q~i ,line Feb. 28.

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OFFICE HOURS
CIRCULATION - 764-0558
COMPLAINTS AND SUBSCRIPTIONS
10 a.m -4 p.m.
CLASSIFIED ADS- 764-0557
10 a.m.-4 p.m
DEADLINE FOR NEXT DAY-12:00 p.m.
QISPLAY ADS-764-0554
MONDAY thru FRIDAY-12 p.m.-4 p.m.
Deadline for Sunday issue-
THURSDAY at 5 p.m.
DEADLINE 2 days in advance by 3 p.m.
Friday at 3 p.m. for Tuesday's paper

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THIS WEEK ONLY !
4 PERFORMANCES -POWER CENTER

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lea rann, BrogsCr. ol Attention:
Conservation Serv., Yale Law Scb.
& DePaul U./Law; Thurs., Nov. 21: ┬░nucmn
Holly Stores, Inc. Harper Hosp.I deadline for
MIT/Dept. Urban Studies & Plan- Further deta
ning, Inst. Paralegal Training, -
N~orthwestern U/Soh, of Educ. (MAT T11E!M
Dept.), & Aetna Life & Casualty Co. volum
ov. 13, Tobe-Coburn/School for
'Fashion Careers; Nov. 19. The In- Sunday,
stitute for Paper Chemistry/Grad. 'is edited and
School of Engrg. & . at. SciencesJ at the Uflivei
(Internships); and Nov. 21, Aetna! phone 764-O5(
Life & Casualty.I paid at Ann
ATTENTION WOMEN: Grants of Published dt
$3000 (Zonta International-Earhart Sunday morn
Fellowship) to best qualified wo- sity year at 4
men with bachelor's degree in a Arbor. Michi
sci. acceptable as reparatory for F ates: $10 by
advanced aerospace studies in an $11 local mait
approved college of your choice, 12non -local
Phone 764-7460 for complete inf or- Sfoer
mation. iSday mtrug
GUIDES FOR EXPO 1975: Ms. Suay brptio
*n
Carol Bulche, Exhibit Guide Re- Sucptian
cruiter, U.S.I.A. will be at Career l(calmsailt
Planning & Placement on Thurs. (Mchmian
INov. 14. Seeking Japanese speaking (ihgnaa

Summer Federal An-
S414 has arrived; apps.
)Jan. 'exam, Dec. 13.
ails available.
MICHIGAN DAILY
me LXXXV, No. 58
y, November 10, 1974
d managed by students
ersity of Michigan. News
562. Second class postage
Arbor, Michigan 48106.
a i l y Tuesday through
ning during the Univer-
420 Maynard Street, Ann
igan 48104. Subscription
y carrier (campus area);
il (Michigan and Ohio);
% mail (other states and
session published Tues-
h Saturday morning.
rates: $5.50 by carrier
rea); $6.00 local mail
ther states and foreign).
and Ohio); $6.50 non-

people who can:

Have a few extra moments
during the day? Need
something to occupy your mind?
THEN, tuck a copy of
Crossword Puzzle
under your arm.

Step lively, Carruthers...
treat's on me.
My faith in Chumly
is restored!'
This Jolly Tiger is a rare breed indeed. At long last your hunt for a super family
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RDP~AVkTA CT I I lIfIl- T.r rilNKIPD CR~P\/F) '24 H-C)I J C A flAYV

''kN .::: . . . i' . "x -',, .. :": . r: .:"- ::1': .''t Y "

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