100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 06, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEPW

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 6, 1974

}

TRAVEL MICH. UNION 763-21
DOMESTIC FLIGHTS
SPECIAL FARES
SAVE 20%
CHRISTMAS-Deadline Nov. 19
NEW YORK
LOS ANGELES
SAN FRANCISCO
DALLAS
All flights on scheduled
American Airlines-non stop jets 1
FOR FURTHER DETAILS-CONTACT
{ tTRAVEL
International Student ID cards now available )

_i

T he
nally
OFFICE HOURS
Circulation Dept. . 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
764-0554
Classified Dept.. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
764-0558
Display Dept... I11 a.mA- p.m.
764-0557
Please try to call our offices during
these hours.

Dems win in landslide

(Continued from Page 1)
SEN. THOMAS Eagleton of
Missouri, the vice-presidentia
running mate McGovern dump
ed in 1972, was re-elected in
Missouri.
For the Republicans, Sen. Ja
cob Javits was re-elected over
former Atty. Gen. Ramsey
Clark in New York. Sens. Rich
ard Schweiker of Pennsylvania
and Charles Mathias of Mary

land won new terms. Republi- the campaign. "The mandate ofI
can Rep. Louis Wyman was the electorate places upon the
f elected to the Senate in New next Congress a full measure of
l Hampshire, succeeding the re- responsibility for resolving this
- tiring Sen. Norris Cotton. problem," he said at the White
z Ford said the economy was House. "I will work with them
the dominant issue. Others said wholeheartedly in this urgent
- Watergate. Most politicians said task, which is certainly beyond
it was both. partisanship."
About 145 million Americans
- BUT THE President said were eligible to vote but off-
there could be no argument that year turnouts are traditionally
- inflation was the No. 1 issue in low. Forty-three per cent of the

GEO and 'U' sign dues pact

DAILY CLASSIF IEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

By JEFF DAYj
The Graduate Employes Or-
ganization (GEO) s i g n e d a
tentative agreement with the
University last night providing
for automatic deduction of union
dues from paychecks.
The two sides have been in
agreement on the issue for some
time, but various technical de-
tails have delayed final ap-
proval.
DURING most of the meeting
however, GEO began re-intro-
ducing demands which the Uni-
versity had dropped from con-
sideration. Most of these pro-
posals were concerned with
working conditions and union
facilities and had been rejected
because of cost considerations.
The demands which drew the
most University fire were de-
mands for free office space for
the union, access to University
centrex phones, space for meet-

ings and parking permits to be
used on conducting official union
business.
The University objected to the
demands again on the basis of
cost and the fear that other
unions would have to be granted
the same thing.
"WE'RE NOT in the business
of supporting any labor union
with facilities. We are in the!

IN REPRESENTING the de-
mands, the GEO dropped back
from their earlier positions
somewhat, in an attempt to
make the positions more agree-
able to the University.
The proposals presented in-
cluded demands that:
-all graduate student em-
ployes be given desk space,
where possible, a retreat fi om

eligible voters cast ballots in
the last off-year elections, in
1970.
This time, apathy and politi-
cal disenchantment spawned by
Watergate, and even some rainy
weather in the East and Mid-
west, seemed likely to hold the
turnout even lower.
The level of participation will
not be known for several days,
but as President Ford noted,
some surveys indicate a turn-
out of only 40 per cent of the
electorate.
iIf that is the case, Ford said
inan election-eve statement,
the 94th Congress which will
have to deal with major eco-
nomic woes could be chosen by
only 21 per cent of the voters.
F o r d' s personal campaign
spanned nearly 17,000 miles,
covering 20 states, and he made
inflation his theme. Watergate,
the scandal that brought the
appointed President to office,
was always in the background
as he warned against election
decisions that could undermine
the two-party system.
He raised the spectre of run-
away, inflation-fueling spending
by a "veto-proof Congress" with
Democratic margins that could
overrule him by the required
two-thirds votes.
Pollsters and candidates were
virtually unanimous: r i s i n g
prices in a slumping economy
comprised The Issue of 1974.
-county

l

business of education," person- the earlier demand they be
nel director William Neff told given an entire desk to them-
the union. selves; and
The union however, argued -input into final grades given
that principle had been estab- to students by teaching fellows
lished at otheruideentestabd be standardized and agreed on
thtshedtteauniversities, and in advance. The proposal met
that the demands would facili- considerable University objec-
tate cooperation between the tion despite the fact that the
ey CEO power granted was not as broad
In another area, the GEO as originally demanded.
reintroduced demands for guar- -
anteed working standards con-
cerning office space, textbooks D * .
and course input.

SSOPH SHOW
PRESENTS:
one
hell
of a
musical

commission race
(Continued from Page 1) der agreed, saying "Being a
woman helped McClary to vic-
DEMOCRATIC Party worker tory."

Tom Wieder cited Fojtik's in-
cumbency and major party
status as advantages in her
success. "And despite the stuff
dumped on her by the HRP she
came across," he added.
Wieder also asserted that the
relatively large voter turnout
probably helped Foitik, "since
the small core HRP vote was
overcome."
In the 15th district McClary
won handily in an area thought
to be strongest in favor of
HRP. In that race, City Council-
woman Kathy Kozachenko cited
a tendency of voters to vote
for a woman over a man. Wie-
Was7;s

BOTH WIEDER and Koza-
chenko agreed that the turnout
generally helped the Demo-
crats. "The HRP always finds
it difficult to educate people
as to who we are. Two months
is not sufficient and in the end
we are always the underdog."
Wegbreit said, "The only thing
that could have beat me was
straight Democratic voting -
and it did. The system is rigged
for two parties and its really
hard to win as a third party
candidate.
In other county commissioner
races, Republicans appeared to
have won districts two, three,
four, ten, eleven and twelve.
Democrats appeared to have
sewed up districts five, six,
seven, eight and nine, and 13.
The first district, usually a
strongly Republican area, ap-
pears to have a democrat lead.

MICHIGAN'S MOST
COMPLETE HI-FI &
ELECTRONICS CENTERS

OUR ENTIRE STOCK*
24 HOURS Thursd y & Friday Only!o
"Except fair traded products, combination systems, specially sale priced items.
NO DEALERS, NO RAINCHECKS, NO LAYAWAYS
CHOOSE FROM NAME BRAND STEREOS, RADIO, T.V.'s, TAPE RECORD-
ERS, CALCULATORS, CAR STEREOS. 2-WAY RADIOS, ANTENNAS AND
ELECTRONIC PARTS!

Nov. 14-16

8 P.M

MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
Advance Tickets
in the FISHBOWL
Wed. & Thurs., Nov 6-7
1 a.m.-3 p.m.

ASSOCIATION OF JEWISH
FACULTY AND GRADS
ANNOUNCES THEIR FIRST
COFFEE HOUR
Wednesday, Nov. 6 at 8 P.M.
in the HILLEL FRONT LOUNGE
1429 Hill St.
CONVERSATION-COFFEE-STROLLING MUSICIANS

I

I

®i

ADC 250XE
MAGNETIC PHONO
CARTRIDGE
SPECIAL PURCHASE! Magnetic phono
cartridge with precision elliptical dia-
mond stylus.

WATT'S DISC PREENER
KEEP YOUR NEW
RECORDS NEW!
Famous record care device. No film or
residue to clog stylus.

When you enroll in Air Force ROTC
you can get more: an opportunity for
a scholarship, a chance
for flying lessons...and
ntOe
alow nCe O $100 .
Intersted

I

REG.
$59.00

$ 88o

REG.
$4.95

$Z88

I

U
m
25 FT. COILED

WIDE RANGE DYNAMIC
STEREO HEADPHONES
Wide frequency response. Perfect for

2 5 FT. COILED
STEREO HEADSET
EXTENSION CORD

.I

privacy and comfort.
REG.

e'mon

REG.

. , . ;fir' ^ r

rn A- E r, r ... - T =-SosI

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan