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November 06, 1974 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-06

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, November 6, 1974

LOVE GORY M V ES-
The Montezuma Horny Bull:'"
1 oz. Montezuma Tequila. VI
5 oz. CONCENTRATED ORANGE H t ZUM8'
BREAKFAST DRINK. Over ice.
It's sensational, and that's no bull TEQUILA
01974. 80 Proof.Tequila. Barton Distillers ImportCoNewYorkNew York.

Esch retains seat,.
wins over Rent he r

(Continued from Page 1)
Reuther failed to generate mo-
mentum early in the contest.
Reuther has traveled in high
Democratic circles for the past
six years, having worked on
the late Sen. Robert Kennedy's
presidential campaign and co-
ordinated George McGovern's
Massachusetts primary organi-
zation in 1972.
Throughout t h e campaign,
Reuther attempted to hammer
away at Esch's eight-year rec-
ord in the House, particularly
trying to link him to the cur-
rent inflation and the policies
of the Nixon administration.
BUT ESCH, a moderate Re-
publican, stressed his image as
an independent voice on Capi-
tol Hill who has bucked his
party's leadership on military
snending and other important
policies.
Considered a swing regin,
the Second Congressional Dis-
trict includes Washtenaw, Mon-
roe, and parts of several other5
counties and has a constituency
that combines blue collar, pro-

fessional, and agricultural work-
ers with the highest percentage
of college students of any dis-
trict in the country.
Esch's chore in winning re-
election was made even more
difficult in 1972 when the dis-
trict was revised to include
m o r e predominantly Demo-
cratic areas.
NONETHELESS, Esch easily
defeated Marvin Stempien, a
longtime Livonia Democrat.
Esch dispatched him by just
about the same difference as Pe
dumped Reuther last night.
Clearly Reuther was hurt
badly by the difficult primary
in which he edged out Ann Ar-
bor physician Edward Pierce
by a mere 100 votes. Following
the election, Pierce asked for at
recount that stalled the Reuther
bandwagon for six weeks while
counting was completed.
Ballotn
"Ian wins

Milli1ken
(Continued fromi Page 1) dz
a ~apparently not severely dam- ti
aged by charges. that his run-,
ning mate James Damman (R- f
Troy) was guilty of conflict-of-
4 Y $ interest while a Troy city coun-
cilman. t
Human Rights Party guber- w
natorial candidate Zolton Fer- p
ency captured about one per w'
cent of the vote-drawing away nt
some of the left-wing support
f or .Levin.
THROUGHOUT the campaign, SL
2N ~the polls showed Milliken and !at
Levin running neck-and-neck in ei
a tight race which remainedr
fairly lw-keyuntil the last four
weeks.
Levin: The loser The major point of contro-
versy between the two candi- c
Iin
Race for State Senate and
ti
_W _AWrke
Hous g" ouvi t Uetr f t
OR~eO OW O W~e t

wins

sates was their differing posi-
ions on Proposal C - a state-
vide ballot issue to repeal the
ood and drug sales tax.
Milliken took no position on
he issue until early October,
hen he finally came out in op-
osition because the tax repeal
vould cause a $200 million reve-
ue loss for the state.
LEVIN, however, strongly
upported the ballot proposal
nd maintained that the project-
A $220 million deficit could be
eplaced simply by eliminating
bureaucratic deadwood" in
,ansing.
The governor centered his
:mpaign around the record
vhich Levin had attacked as be-
ng ineffectual. Stressing his ac-
omplishments in the areas on
ax reform, consumer protec-
on, and the environment, Milli-
en cultivated his image as an
onest politician with the in-
erests of the people at heart.
A moderate Republican, he
scended to the state's top post
hen former Governor George
omney resigned in 1968 to be-
ome Secretary of Housing and
rban Development in the Nix-
rn administration. Milliken first
umped into the political arena
hen he was elected to the
tate senate in 1960 from his
ometown of Traverse City.

(Continued from Page 1)
Bullard first rankled other
representatives by openly smok-
ing marijuana during the April,
1973 Hash Bash on the Diag-an
event that got national publicity.

campaign reform. Both Eck-
stein and Bursley, as well as
Human Rights Party candidate
Lisa North, were for the elimi-
nation of the tax on food and
drugs.
However, while Bursley advo-
cated an increase in the flat-
rate income tax, Eckstein pro-
posed a graduated form of in-I

come tax. North also advocated
a graduated income tax but
said it should be "very steep."
Bursley outspent his oppo-
nents by far, throwing nearly
$26,000 into the campaign while
Eckstein, an economics profes-
sor, and North, a University
student, spent $6,000 and $200
respectively.

a
w
'R
ci
'U
or
w:
st
ht

RUNNING an expensive me-
narPP ow l dia campaign, Weaver, a Uni-
na rl versity graduate who now works
(continued from Page 1) as Mayor James Stephenson's
administrative secretary, cen-
Rights Party. tered her campaign on Bul-
lard's alleged ineffectiveness.
BUT Democratic city council- She made women's issues an
man Jamie Kenworthy warned important element in her plat-
that the proposal does insure a form, pegging her slim chance
Democratic victory. for victory on a strong femin-
"It's a good thing for the ist vote.
city, and might mean the unity A1e x a n d e r, an elementary
of Democrats," Kenworthy said. teacher, hit Ballard's record,
"But it won't automatically , while backing HRP positions in
elect a Democratic mayor. That favor of a steeply graduated
needs a good candidate and hard inc(1'Pe tax, guaranteed annual'
work." income, and socialization of
Human Rights Party (HRP) public utilities.
members greeted the voting Although running an optimis-
nian ecstatically with shouts of : tic race, Alexander received
"No more years" (for Mayor little financial support from the
James Stephenson). Diane Hall party which poured its re-
declared, "I really think one of sources into contests that ap-
our greatest strengths is in the peared easier to win.
ballot issues and even if we C H A R G E S AND counter-
don't win a lot of our strength charges were exchanged in the
comes from educational cam- waning hours of the state senate
paigns." race. Eckstein attacked Bursley
She claimed preferential vot- for alleged misuse of his frank-
ing is "solely an HRP gain," ing privileges, while Bursley
asserting that the "Democrats charged that Eckstein "illegal-'
didn't give the ' financial sup- ly" used a poster to mislead
port they promised and we did voters into thinking he was the
all the work." incumbent.
Councilwoman Carol Jones Otherwise the campaign cen-
(D-first ward) greeted the tered on the issues of tax and
plan's passage jubilantly. She
declared, "I thought it was
going to fail because Republi-
cans and Democrats alike are
basically suspicious of change Have a flair tor
in our voting process." She Ia you reinirest-s
added, "It has a lot of good ed in reviewing
political principles." poetry, and music
----_______or writing feature
(Z' stories a b out th3e

Democrats Roach, Power
lead in Regents contest

(Coutinued from Page l> University affairs. The six Re-
trailed far behind. gents seats not up for election
this year are divided evenly
THE TWO new Regents will among three Republicans and
be seated for eight-year terms three Democrats.
on the eight-member body that The Regents race seemed to
exercises near-total control over feature a minimal amount of

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FOUND
through
CkIassif ieds
For prompt
service
CALL

C 4 y
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voter interest despite a flock
of 15 candidates. As in other
recent elections, the new Re-
gents were voted into office
barely noticed at the end of a
long ballot. The results appear-
ed to follow the state trend that
soported Democrats in nearly
all state offices except the gov-
ernorshin.
The Regents' campaign fea-
tilred hopefuls from all shades
of the political spectrum, from
the A m e r i c a n Independent
Party (ATP) of George Wallace
to the ultra-leftist U.S. Labor /
Party.
LTRFRAL and radical candi-
dues in the contest tended to
stress pronosals for ending al-
l"eed dis-rimination against
women and minority groups by
the University, while conserva-
tives have stressed financial
prhlerms.
"My main concern is that the
University mast not be permit-
ted to continue its present racist
and sexist nolicies," says Pow-
er, the cnrrent leader. She
aro' P that the University "has
not hen me-ting its responsi-
Ylities" in hiring blacks and
xTmei, nd points out that
there is only one black female
nr"PacGnr Pt the University.
Demo-rati- honefiils have in-
;^aterl their strong sunnort for
ri 1 workers' and Graduate
E'nnloves demands for higher
wages.r e-Tr'blicans, however,
,ave de"1i~nd to indicate wheth-
or not thpv would sne-ifical-
lv *innort demands for higher
jwnaes.
Power, an Ann Arbor resident,
;q the d-iirhter-ina-"w of former
Plant F',ene Power.
Reanch is a resident of Grosse
Pointe.

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

w drama, dance, V 1' I +
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, c/o The(
Michigan Daily,
rl

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Office of Student Life
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MICHAEL
Classical Guitarist
Pease Auditorium
8 P.M.
November 7
General Admission
$1.50
TICKETS ON SALE AT McKENNY UNION
This event is made possible with the support of the Mich-
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764-0557
Deadline is noon one (1) day in advance

Last Niuhtst
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Men and Women
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