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November 05, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-05

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Tuesday, November 5, 1974

rHE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

H 'CIANDIY aeIhe

:ii

Late donations
to congressional,
hopefuls pile up

Javanese Music and Dance
PRESENTED BY
The University of Michigan
Gamelan Ensemble
NOVEMBER 7, THURSDAY
8:00 P.M.-HILL AUDITORIUM

"GET
ATTENTION

Sponsored by:
Center for South

ADMISSION FREE
and Southeast Asian Studies

WASHINGTON (A') - Last
minute reports of large cam-1
paign contributions piled up
yesterday in government offices
but many were kept from pub-
lic view by bureaucratic delays.}
Those reports that were avail-
able showed a pattern of 11th-
hour borrowing by candidates
and political committees and
last minute donations by big la-
bor unions and political parties.
Sen. George McGovern (D-S.
D.), reported getting a last-min-
ute donation of $5,000 from the
AFL-CIO's political arm, and
another $5,000 from the Machin-
ists Union.
SEN. BARRY Goldwater (R-
Ariz.), reported a $10,000 dona-
tion from the Republican Cam-
paign Committee.
Telegrams continued to pour
into the Secretarytof the Senate
and the Clerk of the House to-
day, telling of fresh donations
of $5,000 and more. Anything
smaller won't have to be re-
ported officially until next Jan.
31, the deadline for filing year-
end campaign spending reports.
WEEKEND analysis of the
most recent batch of compre-

AP Photo
Dayan addresses crowd
Former Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Dayan speaks to a crowd of demonstrators protest-
ing the scheduled appearance of Palestinian Liberation Organization delegates before the
United-Nations at Dag Hammarskjold Plaza in New York yesterday. The crowd was estimat-
ed at approximately 100,000.
ANTI-U.S. GESTURE:
Terrorists bomb American

out 26 republican congressmen,
including House Minority Lead-
er John Rhodes, (R-Ariz.), along
with four GOP senators up for
re-election as big spenders bas-
ed on their vote on 20 key mon-
ey bills. About 50 Democrats
fall in the same category, Jim
Davidson, the union's executive
director, said at a press confer-
ence yesterday.
Thirty-seven House Republi-
cans and 31 Democrats were
considered frugal enough to be!
ranked as "little spenders," Da-
vidson said. Rep. H.R. Gross
(R-Iowa) was named as the
congressman tightest with the
taxpayer's dollar.
THE LEADING Senate tight-
wad was first-term Republican
William Roth of Delaware, ac-
cording to the union. Sens. Hi-
ram Fong (R-Hawaii), and Gale
McGee (D-Wyo.), were labeled
the Senate's biggest spenders
by the study's standards.n s
The biggest spending senator
up for re-election was Daniell
Inouye (D-Hawaii), who has no
Republican opponent, the union
said. Other big spenders facing:
the voters tomorrow are Repub-
licans Charles Mathias of Mary-
land, Jacob Javits of New York,
Milton Young of North Dakota,;
and Henry Bellmon of Okla-
homa, and Democrat Mike Gra-
vel of Alaska, according to the
survey.
tAbortion Alternative
a .
OFFERED BY
Problem Pregnancy
Help
24 hr. phone: 769-7283
Office: 400 S. Division
Main floor, Street entrance
(corner of William)
FREE PREGNANCY TESTING

II.

1

newspaper of

By AP and Reuter
ROME--Extremists bombed the office of the
Rome Daily American newspaper yesterday a
few hours before Secretary of State Henry Kis-
singer flew in to address the World Food Con-
ference.
It was the third anti-American attack in three
days, and security authorities mobilized more
than 700 soldiers and police to guard airports
and streets to protect the secretary of state.
The latest bombing wrecked the stairway land-
ings and shattered windows on four floors of
the Rome Daily American building on a major
downtown street, but no one was injured. The
English-language paper is owned by Italians but
produced and edited by Americans.
OVER THE- weekend extremists threw fire
bombs into three branches of the Bank of
America and Italy and into the offices of the
Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Co., caus-
ing damage but no injuries.
The protests were inspired by leftists who
claim U. S. Ambassador John Volpe advised

o o hensive reports showed that the
AFL-CIO spent $297,861 in the
ice in 110-day period, more than any
other special interest group. The
Italian politicians to hold early elections to AFL-CIO reported total spending
Thwart a Communist bid for power. The U. S. of $1.7 million through Oct. 24,
Embassy denied he made such a statement. also the most for any political
Authorities expressed fears the Rome pro- group.
tests might build into the worst anti-American Meanwhile, a study by the Na-
demonstrations since former President Richard tional Taxpayers Union singled
Nixon's visit in 1969 when one person was killed

Becoming a physician is a tremendous
satisfaction.
Let us giveyou the job satisfaction
that shoul go with it.
Whether you're still in medical school with the the Air Force does not. He finds hisofficeestablished
rigors of three to five years of graduate medical edu- for him. Supplies and equipment readily available.
cation still to be faced, or are already a practicing He has many options available to him when treating
physician, it's our opinion that the Air Force can patients. For example, he can consult with Air Force
offer both professional and personal satisfaction specialists. He also has referral to other Air Force
hard to duplicate in civilian life. facilities via aeromedical evacuation. Last, but not
An overstatement? Not if'you consider the least, are the satisfactions that come with having
specifics. the opportunity for regular follow-ups, and a missed
Take the problem of graduate medical educa- appointment rate that is practically nil.
tion. It's a period of your life the Air Force can make Whether you are already a physician, or soon to
considerably easier with comfortable salary and liv- become one, you might find it extremely interesting
ing conditions. to find out what the Air Force has to offer. We think
Creature comforts aside, the Air Force offers it could beareal eye-opener. If you'll mail inthecou-
professional advantages. Besides receiving training pon, we'd be happy to send you detailed information.
in your own specialty, you'd be in contact with
physicians in all of the medical specialties. You'll ""
function in an environment which is intellectually Air oregponuunitie C-CM-i14
stimulating and professionally challenging. Peoria,61614
Not all physicians pursue post residency fellow- Please send me information on the Air Force Physician Pro.
ships. But if you are interested, the Air Force con- ( gram. I understand there is no obligation.
ducts them both in-house and atcivilian institutions. I x
The physician already in practice can look for- Name Sex (M)-(F)-
ward to other things. If you want training in the Address
practice of the medicine of the future, you'll find it
in the Air Force. For example, there's emphasis on City
group medicine and preventive medicine, and the State Zip Phone
growing specialty of "family physician." Whatever o
your interest, there are few specialties which are not Soc. Sec.D# ateof Birth
being practiced in today's Air Force. i Health Care at its best.
The physician starting his practice in civilian AirFoce
life has to take into account the cost of setting up an AirForce
ofice. The physician commencing his practice in L............ ..._.

and scores were injured.j
AT THE WORLD Food Conference, a group
of scientists and economists proposed creation
of an international body on the lines of the U.N.
Security Council to provide leadership in the
struggle against famine.
Meeting on the eve of the world food confer-
ence in Rome, the group led by British econo-
mist Barbara Ward (Lady Jackson) appealed
to rich countries - including Arab oil-produc-
ing states - to donate at least five billion dol-
lars a years in agricultural assistance to develop
ing countries.
The group said at least 500 million people
cannot lead normal lives because they are per-
manently hungry.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 53
Tuesday, November 5, 1974
is edited and managed by students'
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d a i ly Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 MaynardsStreet, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
day through Saturday morning.
Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 local mail
local mail (other states and foreign).
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Day Calendar Plan., N. Campus, 4 pm.
Tuesday, November 5 Physics: Low Energy Seminar: T.
WUOM: Ross Lee Finney - A A. Kaplan, MSU, "The Hubbard
Musical Autobiography, 10:30am. Model." 1041 Randall Lab; Theoreti-
Maternal, Child Health Films: cal Seminar: R. Field, Calif. Inst. of
Natural Childbirth: The Story of Tech., "Polarization Effects in In-
Eric, 5318 Thos. Francis Bldg., noon. elusive Processes," 2038 Randall Lab,
CREES: Alexander Matjko, Carl- 4 pm.
ton U., Ottawa, "The Role of In- Values Seminar: Michael Macco-
telligentsia in State Socialism: The by, "The Head vs. the Heart: The
Polish Case,: Commons Rm., Lane Ethical Balance," Rackham Lee.
Hall, 3:30 pm. Halt, 4:10 pm.
Great Lakes Research: Bruce Wil- Phi Beta Kappa: Jean Sutherland
kinson, "Madagura Island: The Evo- Boggs, dir., Nat'l Gallery of Cana-
lution of a Gulf Coast Barrier Com- da, "Picasso - The Last Thirty
plex," Baer Rm., Cooley Lab, 3:45 Years," Aud. A, Angell, 4:10 pm.
pm. Health Care Collective: "Women
Humanities: Marvin Felheim, and Health CareProject of Ann Ar-
"'Pericles': The Problem of the bor Health CareProject of Ann Ar-
Play," Rackham Amph., 4 pm. bor Health Care Collective," 205
Geology, Mineralogy: Daniel Ber- Packard, 7:30 pm.
noulli, U. of Basel, "New Views on Philosophy: R. M. Hare, Oxford
Alphine Tethys Evolution on Joides U., Utilitarianism," Aud. D, Angell,
Results,: 1528 Little Bldg., 4 pm. 8 pm.
Women's Studies: Josette Feral, Computing Ctr.: "Taxir Informa-
"Dialectics of Feminist Movements tion Retrieval System," 3rd Fir.
in France," 1058 LSA, 4pm. Conf. Rm., Victor Vaughn, 8 pm.
Arch., Urban Planning: Wm. Jewish Arts Festival: Levine's
Muschenheim, "The Architecture of "From Shalom Aleichem with Love,"
Germany," 2104 Coll. Arch., Urban 1429 Hill St., 8 pm.

FROM SHALOM ALEICHEM

A Dramatic Presentation

j TUESDAY, NOV. 5-8:00 p.m.
at HILLEL-1429 Hill St.
ST UDENTS $1 .00 NON-STUDENTS $2.00
ST YE'S LUNCH
1313 SO. UNIVERSITY
Home Cooking Is Our Specialty
Breakfast All Day Specials This Week
3 eggs, Hash Browns, Beef Stroqanoff
Toast & Jelly-$1.05 Chinese Pepper Steak
Home-made Beef Stew
Ham or Bacon or Eaq Rolls
Sausage with 3 eggs, Home-made Soups (Beef,
Barley, Clam Chowder, etc,)
Hash Browns, Toast and Chili, Veqetable Tempura
jelly--$1.50 (served after 2 p.m.)
Hamburqer Steak Dinner-
3 eggs, Rib Eye Steak, ( 12lb.) ........$1.79
Hash Browns, Spaqhetti in Wine Sauce
Toast & Jely--$1.90 Beef Curry Rice
FAST AND FRIENDLY SERVICE BY MR. AND MRS. LEE

104

WASHERS & DRYERS
NO WAITING!

,
i
1
1

A

OPEN 24 HOURS
ATTENDANT ALWAYS
ON DUTY
MR. STADIUM
COIN LAUNDRY &
DRY CLEANING
1958 S. INDUSTRIAL
South of E. Stadium Blvd.
668.7928

SAniv.

STAGE PEOPLE:
MUSKET
(The all campus musical)
NEEDS YOU
TO BUILD SCENERY FOR
-~JERICHO-
An Oriainal Musical Comedy
Eventnas (except Sunday 7-11 p.m. in the Student Activi-
ties Buildinq Shop at the corner of Jefferson & Thompson
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY!
Learn new skills! Meet new people!
Help build a Great new show!
COME ON DOWN TO THE S.A.B.

IC

COMMIT
YOURSELF T10HE
IPRIESTHOOD?

BEER
NITE
EVERY TUESDAY
8 p.m.-2 a.m.

REDUCED PITCHERS
AND

wwamumman

i

III

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