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November 02, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-11-02

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN GAILY

Saturday, November 2, 1974 I

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, November 2, 1974

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Professional Theatre Program
FIVE NEW YORK HITS
PLAY OF THE MONTH SERIES
USHER APPLICATION
Name e- - - - - - - - --
Address_____
Telephone U. of M. I.D. No.---_ --
RULES
1. You must be a U. of M. student.
2. You must choose your series in order of preference.
3. Married students may send applications together.
4. This application must be posted by U.S. mail ON OR
AFTER MONDAY; NOVEMBER 4 (fourth), 1974. Mail
to: PTP Office, Mendelssohn Theatre, Ann Arbor,
Michigan, 48104.
5. Include a stamped, self-addressed envelope.
PLEASE NUMBER CHOICE 1, 2, 3, 4
SERIES A: Friday evenings: November 15, Decem-
ber 13, January 17, February 14, March 28.
SERIES B: Saturday evenins:November 16, De-
cember 14, January 18. February 15, March 29.
SERIES C: Sunday matinees: November 17, De-
cember 15, January 19, February 16, March 30.
SERIES D: Sunday evenings: November 17, De-
cember 15, January 19, February 16, March 30.
N O T E CURTAIN T I M E S: All evenings at 8:00 P.M.
Matinees at 3:00 P.M.
SEESAW............... ..November 15-17
December 13-15
OH COWARD! January 17-19
THE RIVER NIGER .... February 14-16
THE SUNSHINE BOYS .. . . March 28-30
***A fifth show to be announced.
ALL SHOWS ARE IN THE POWER CENTER

clerical workers vote to
join UAL by close margin

CONGRESSIONAL RACE

Reuther faces woes

(Continued from Page 1) The Demra'rt's labor ties and

(Continued from Page 1)
votes short of the simple ma-
jority needed to establish a col-
lective bargaining unit. Aster-
IvwardAFSCME endorsed UAW.
EMERICK BLAMED the nar-
rowness of his union's victory
on a moderate voter turnout,
down 300 from the hard-fought
UAV versus AFSCME election
earlier last month.
"There would have peen a
larger margin had there been
a bigger turnout," he claimed.
"There was overconfidence on
the part of our people. 'We
thought we had a sure in."
William Neff, head of the
University Office of Staff and
Union Relations, said his only
regret was that "more oeople
didn't turn out to vote. There's
still a t e r r i f i c amount of

detailed a "no-union" stracegy
in a two-hour, invitation-oaly
meeting with University pro-:
fessional staffers.
As one clerical said, "You've
got to give Bill Neff credit for
bringing the vote out, because
he got people so mad."
CCFA member Susan ous el-
man characterized Neff's move
as "a desperate illegal action"
on the part of the University.
"If we had lost," she said,
"there would have been quite
a lawsuit."
EMERICK SAID a seven-day
period exists between the final
vote and certification of 'he
new union. In that time, chal-
lenges to the vote can 1ie filed
with Michigan Employment Re-
lations Commission. N e i t h e r
Emerick nor Neff indicated that
challenges were forthcoming.
CCFA chairwoman D e b b i e
Moorehead said the first step
for the new union would be to

set up a local organization and He also favors a reduction in nrogressive policy stances may
establish a bargaining commit- lending interest rates set by the ! well have mended the party
tee. ed ere a slit that triggered an easy
_ Federal Reserve Board.!Esch victory over Marvin Stem-!

UAW international staff mem- Carroll advocates a wholesale
bers will then begin research Carladoteawhese
on fringe benefit and wage pro- revamping of U.S. foreign and
ga forbtheclericals. domestic policies that would
bring about public control of
THE CLERICALS are asking the nation's wealth and decision-
for increased wages, a revamp- making processes. As a legisla-
ing of the job classificationvys- tor, he claims, he would work
tem, expanded promotional op- ifor universal free medical care
t exand euproo o- and an end to all government
portunities, and equal opportun-i surveillance of citizens.

ity for women employes.
One happy organizer said last
night that the vote ends a "year
of agony" for the clericals.
However, the agony does not
appear to be over for the Uni-
veristy. Emerick said last night
that the UAW is "having con-
versations" with the campus'
professional and administrative
workers.
He would not comment on
whether these workers were
planning to form a union local.,

REUTHER, nephew of former
UAW President and national
labor leader Walter Reuther,
has lived in the Second District
for just over a year. Although
he's a newcomer to the district,
his candidacy is no Cinderella
story. The 30-year-old former
McGovern strategist used his
famous name and some old-
fashioned party-line savvy to
win a primary victory this sum-
mer.

pien in 1972.
Reuther's strongest challenge
for the Democratic nod came
from Dr. Ed Pierce, director
of Ann Arbor's Summit Medical
Center. First returns on pri-
mary night indicated a probable
Pierce win. However, Livonia
delivered a strong Reuther man-
date, and left the issue dead-
locked.!
AFTER A month-long recount
process, Pierce conceded a
scant 100-vote Reuther victory
margin.
Carroll, a former City Coun-
cil candidate, lost his University
research job upon entering the
race for Congress. He maintains
a "democratic socialist" posture
on the issues and sees little
difference between the two
frontrunners, rejecting what he
calls "the bandaid solutions of
the capitalist candidates."
Ann Arbor native Esch, a
four-term House veteran, enjoys
the solid backing of district Re-I
publicans. He ran unopposed for
the GOP nomination this year.
ACCORDING to liberal legis-
lative watchdog Common Cause,
in 1972 only eight of 435 House
members received more con-

tribittions from big business in-
terests than Esch.
B'it Reuther's war chest hard-
ly su;ffers by comparison. The
$27,000 in Reuther gifts from
local labor (mainly UAW shops)
ranks high among union stakes
in this year's Congressional
races.
Esch, though a long-time fa-
vorite a m o n g businessmen,
seems to echo his main oppon-
ent's views on several key is-
sues. Both he and Reuther op-
pose the five per cent surtax
on lower-middle income fami-
lies and the forced busing of
schoolchildren. Each favors a
national health care plan,
though Reuther claims the plan
he wants, unlike his opponent's,
"Won't line the pockets of big
insurance companies."
In 1972, Reuther coordinated
McGovern forces in the Mas-
sachusetts primary and the
Minnesota general election. He
previously worked- on Indiana
Sen. Birch Baye's Washington
staff and with the Office of
Economic Opportunity.
Last year, Reuther left the
East Coast for Ypsilanti to
serve as a legislative analyst for
Ford Motor Co. His recent ar-
rival spawnedcharges of "car-
petbagging" early in the cam-
paign. But Reuther brushes
them off, saying, "I never
claimed to represent the people
on a seniority basis."

apathy."

clericals

HOWEVER, s o m e

sarcastically thanked Neff
assistance in getting out
vote. Two weeks ago, he

for'
the
had

this is ELECT'
RAE WNEAVER on
CAMPAIGN FINANCE REFORM
True reform has yet to come in the State of Michigan. The Loophole Bill
was pushed through the legislature with Rep. Bullard's support. Where was
he when an amendment to take the loopholes out of the present bill was /
voted upon? Again, our Rep. did not vote.}
I support legislation that would give the people of Michigan true reform,
not "loophole" legislation.
53rd Dist. Rep. St. Rep.
Douq Crary/Treas.

STATE CAMPAIGN
Senate race stresses issues

(Continued from Page 1)
advocates s t e e p graduations,
with elimination of many cur-
rent loopholes.
ECKSTEIN HAS also attack-
ed Bursley's school financing
bill. "The Bursley Act is insuf-
ficient," he contends, claiming
the law "only rearranges the in-
justices, and makes schools
more dependent than ever on
local property taxes."
Under the bill, which takes
effect in 1975, some school dis-
tricts could receive up to three
times as much money as others,
depending on the local property

tax base, Eckstein says.
Ecksteincalls fortcampaign
financing totally at the public's
expense and argues, "We need
full disclosure of campaign con-
tributions, but we also need lim-
its on how much an individual
can contribute or a campaign
can spend."

choice, and candidates would
redeem the coupons for money.
Bursley agrees that campaign
reform is necessary but has
failed to offer any solid pro-
posals. In the past, he has voted
against contribution limits, re-
quired disclosure of groups'
contributions, and gift ceilings.

Milliken says he
won't dump mate

--- -- - - -

North assertsthat public fi-
HE HAS PROPOSED a sys- onancing of elections is nieded
tem w h e r e b y all registered to eliminate the power of oig
voters in the state would receive money in politics.
five coupons worth two dollars In the senate campaign, the
each. The voter would send the incumbent will spend close to
$26,000, while Eckstein and
coupons to the candidates or North expect to spend $6,000
ballot proposals of his or her and $200 respectively.
Chlorinated water
may cause cancer
WASHINGTON (Reuter)-A government official said yes- 1
terday there was cause for concern but not alarm over a
discovery that chlorination of water can create suspected
cancer-causing agents.
James McDermott, director of the Division of Water Supplyt
in the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), confirmed a,
report by the Nationals Broadcasting Company (NBC) that EPA,
scientists had found carcinogenic agents in chlorinated drinking
water in Cincinnati last summer.
AS A RESULT of the findings, McDermott said in an inter-K
view, the federal agency was trying to determine whether the
present chlorination process was dangerous, whether the chlorine
itself could cause cancer and, if so, how the cancer-producing
agents could be eliminated.t
McDermott said EPA scientists were certain chlorine was
the cause of the carcinogens (cancer-producing agents) becauset
of its interaction with residual organisms in the water.t
"But we're convinced chlorinated water is still safe to
drink" McDermott said. "It was safe yesterday and it's stillf
safe today."
NBC, IN ITS report, had said that a memorandum circu-
lated within the EPA warned agency employes to prepare for
a considerable uproar on the part of the public, water utilitiesl
and states with regard to the demonstration of known carcino-
gens in public water systems."
An estimated 140 million Americans drink water that has
been purified with chlorine. Most of the remaining 60 millioni
drink unchlorinated water from various sources.C

(Continued from Page 1)
other tight battle with the 43-
year old Berkley lawyer.
The imnact of the Damman
affair. which exploded with four
days left in the campaign, also
disrupted Levin's campaign
plans.
He canceled two apneanrances
last night to consult aides and
nartv leaders and to await word
of developments in Lansing.
THE ALLEGATIONS against
Damman stem from reports of,
his condlwt as a Trov zoning
official and city coinilman.
The Detroit Free Press said
nammpan and several partners
iea land investment firm pur-
chased land secretly while Dam-
man was helning to draw up a
master development plan for
Troy.
It also said real estate and
land develonment figures were
chief contrib-tors to Damman's
sticessf"l 1970 camnaign for a
seat in the state legislature.
AS THE ISSUE er'nted, Dam-
man went into seclusion, can-
celed all his own campaign
nlans and denied he was guilty
of any unethicalor illegal con-
du-,t while in office in Troy.
He also said he could explain
every allegation.
"I am not bitter," Damman
said. "I am disappointed and
disillusioned."
L E V I N CHALLENGED
Milliken to sneak out publicly
on the Damman affair, then
after Milliken began consulta-
tions in Lansing, he said:
"Milliken has the responsibil-
ity to find out all of the facts
and if the answer is yes on the
allegations, Damman has to
go."
Levin aides said the Damman
issue has hurt Milliken.
SO DID GOP figures, but they
said there appeared no easy
way out for Milliken. There
were some suggestions the go-
ernor would force Damman off
the ticket, but other observers
said this would cause even more
problems.
Milliken was in Saginaw when
he abruptly interrupted a tour
to return to the capital.
"The governor will take some
kind of action within the next
24 hours," an aide said.
AS TENSION grew through-
out the day and night, Milliken
remained huddled with aides
and GOP leaders.
The announcement that Milli-

ken would wait another day be-
fore deciding his next move
came at 10:45 p.m.
disag",ree
on bias
clause
tract. Just because we're argu-
ing doesn't mean we want dis-
crimination."
There was also disagreement
over the University demand that
union members refrain from
striking, picketing, and demon-
strating against the University.
The GEO objected strongly to
the clause, saying that it, would
limit their right to free speech.
GEO NEGOTIATOR M a rk
Ferrenz claimed the clause
"would work to categorically
prevent any criticism of the
University while the contrazt
was in effect."
"Our tendency is to think
that's p r o b a b 1 y unconstitu-
tional," 'GEO bargainer Zena
Zumeta said.
The University disagreed. "I
don't think it's unconstitutional.
The first amendment right of
free speech is not without lim-
it," said University attorney
William Lemmer.
"THIS IS the price you pay,
the responsibility your union has
to agree to, for the rights you
get in other parts of the con-
tract," he continued.
The two sides did reach ac-
cord on several minor fringe
benefit items, including gradu-
ate employes' library privileges
and workers' right to examine
the University's personnel files.
Have a flair for
artistic writinq?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories a b ou t the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, c/o The
Michigan Daiy.

SENATOR BURSLEY ON U OF M CAMPUS

THEY KNOW THE RECORD
Michigan Student Environmental Confederation rates Senator Bursley 80%
third highest in the 38 member Senate
PIRGIM rates Bursley 77% on consumer, environmental, human rights and
political reform legisaltion, highest among all Republican senators

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

National Association of Women
the Senate

(NOW)

gives Bursley 75%, third best in

Since '72, Free V.D. Clinics
ACTIONS SPEAK.
NOV. 5-Democrat-DIST. 14

g
i;
I
w
e
t1
s
P
6
t
k
2
0
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a

ZPG Michigan Confederation rates Bursley 90%, highest in the entire Legis-
lature on environmental and population legislation. ZPG endorses him.
National Association of Social Workers, Huron V a II e y Chapter, endroses
Bursley
Civic & Consumer Council (Civic Spotlight) endorses Bursley
Michigan Education Association (MEA), Michigan Association of School
Boards (MASB), Michigan Association of School Administrators (MASA)
and Michigan Congress of School Administrators all endorse Bursley
STATE SENATOR

UNIVERSITYj

VALUES

YEAR

PRESENTS
DR. MICHAEL MACCOBY
-social psychoanalyst, colleague of Erich Fromm, director, Harvard U. Project on
Technology, Work and Character Fellow, Institute for Policy Studies, Washington, D.C.
"HEAD VERSUS HEART: THE ETHICAL BALANCE"

III - - - 11 m ---

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