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October 31, 1974 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-31

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Thursday, October 31, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

race Nine

Thursday, October31, 1974 THE I MICHIGAN. DAILY Page 1Ni-e

Milliken running
hard on decency
in goveror' s race

Magruder tells coverup role

(Continued from Page 1)
attempted to lay m'ich of the
blame for crime, inflation, and
unemployment on the Gover-
nor's administration.
Meanwhile, Milliken is pa-
tiently explaining to his consti-
tuents how the energy crisis
has been largely responsible for
Michigan's bleak unemployment
picture; also, he is urging that
more money be allocated to
fight crime.
"IT IS irresponsible to s'ig-
gest that the governor by him-
self can improve the inflation
picture," Milliken told a group
of college newspaper editors
earlier this month. "Saying so
only serves in undermining the
confidence of the people."
The one issue which Milliken
is actively and consistently
pushing is Proposal D-a state-
wide ballot issue which would
provide for a comprehensive
transportation program without'
any budgetary impact until
1976-77.
"My pet project is the mass!
transit program," he declared
at a press conference in Ann
Arbor last month. "Nothing is
as important to the future of
this state than the adoption of
this proposal."

systems," he said at a press
conference last month. "There
is no need to change it. It is
more progressive than the in-
come tax found in many states
with a graduated system."
Presently, all Michigan resi-
dents pay a 3.9 per cent flat
rate tax on their income.
A MODERATE Republican,
Milliken has taken the middle
road on most controversial is-
sues-particularly amnesty.

(Continued from Page I)
eman, former assistant Atty.
Gen. Robert Mardian and Ken-
: ' neth Parkinson, a" lawyer for
the re-election committee.
MAGRUDER was questioned
by assistant prosecutor Jill Wine
Volner who was frequently in-
terrupted by objections by Park-
inson's lawyer, Jacob Stein.
Magruder testified that in the
second week following the
break-in his offer to step for-
ward as the official responsible
for the crime was turned down
because "it was too well known
that I had no authority for
making policy or approval for
financial expenditures."
Magruder said Mitchell con-
sidered the idea for a time, but {
after consulting with White

House officials it was decided I
that Mitchell and Haldeman
were too close to Magruder for I
the blame to be dumped solely
on Magruder.
AS A RESULT, said Magru-
der, he and Mitchell, with help
from Parkinson and Mardian,
devised an explanation for the
$250,000 Liddy budget.
Magruder testified on Tues-
day that Mitchell gave his spe-
cific approval for Liddy to spend
the money, on illegal wiretap- 1
ping and burglary against the
Democrats.
To back up Magruder's grand
jury testimony, he said the re-
election committee scheduling
{ director, Herbert Porter, was
persuaded to testify falsely that
$100,000 of Liddy's money was

used to protect Republican
speakers traveling about the
country on behalf of Nixon's re-
election,
MAGRUDER said the remain-
ing $150,000 was to be accounted
for as security at the Republican
National Convention first in San
Diego, then in Miami Beach,
once a decision had been made
to switch cities.
Magruder recounted that the
first time he met Parkinson,

Mardian told him to tell the
whole truth about the break-in.
Parkinson had been hired as an
outside lawyer for the re-
election committee.
i
For one hour and a half, Ma-
gruder laid out the story for
Parkinson, and then was sum-
moned later by Mitchell who
asked why he had not told
Parkinson the cover story pre-
pared for use before the grand
ijury.

"I support the

Ford plan

generally," Milliken said ear-
lier this month. "It is a plan
designed to satisfy no one com-
pletely. I don't favor total am-
nesty or a policy of vengeance,
and I believe the country has no
resourse but to see that draft
evaders earn their way back."
Milliken entered the political
arena in 1960 when he ran for,
the state senate from his home-
town, Traverse City. After a six-
year stint in the legislature,
Milliken rode into the lieuten-
ant governor's office on the
strength of George Romney in
1966.
TWO YEARS later, when
Romney departed to be the Sec-
retary of Housing and Urban
Development under the Nixon
Administration, Milliken moved

AP Photo
JEB STUART MAGRUDER prepares to enter a car in the
basement garage of the U.S. District Court in Washington
yesterday after his second day of testimony as a prosecution
witness at the Watergate cover-up trial. Magruder informed
the court yesterday he was assured that President Nixon
was "particularly pleased at my efforts at keeping the truth
of Watergate from coming out." Magruder, formerly the
deputy director of Nixon's 1972 re-election campaign, is now
serving a minimum 10-month prison term for his own part
in the cover-up.
SINCE '72, NO WAIT
AT HEALTH CLINICS
Actions Speak

said by sartre & genet to be omerica's greatest living poet

f
Treat Yourself To Our
LUNCHIEON SPECIAL !
The are wic
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with your choice of a natural
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FEATURING FRESH BAKED GOODS from
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ALSO - Grains, Beans, Nut's, Herbs,
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Complete Service Natural Food
RESTAURANT, GROCERY, BAKERY
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~Y +ww

FOJT1 K
Nov. 5-Democrat-Dist, 14
Pd. Pol. Adv.

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22634 Woodward, Ferndale, Mich.--546-3282

JEWISH DANCE

IF PASSED, the transit pro- into the governor
gram would be implemented by Although he wa
a $1.1 billion bonding program. garded as an ine
Not only would the Detroit in his earlier ye
transportation system be up- nor, Milliken ha
graded, but rail service, bus
service, and bicycle paths will wide-ranging res
be increased. ability to coalesc
During the past few weeks, tions and gatherb
the most consistent battle- port for his progr
ground between the two candi-
dates has been their different
stands on Proposal C - a bal-
lot issue which would repeal
Michigan's drug and food sales ! r
tax.O
Milliken, who came out in op-
position to the measure only
four weeks ago, contends the \
state cannot afford the $200 mil-
lion revenue loss which would
come with approval of the pro-
posal. u s r
"I AM opposed to repealing
the sales tax on food and
drugs," Milliken asserted dur- Tod
ing a debate with Levin earlier
this month. "It would be a mis-
take. There's every reason to
believe the people will have to 764-
Pay twice.76
Levin, however, has come out
strongly in favor of the pro-{
posal and says the deficit can
be covered simply by eliminat-
ing the "bureaucratic dead-
wood" in Lansing.
Although Milliken's campaign
has been largely funded by such
big names as Max Fisher, a
Detroit businessman; H e n r y
Ford, and Lee Iacocca, presi- m i
dent of Ford Motor Co. He still
maintains that he represents
the common people and that his
interests lie only in protecting
the consumer.

's office.
s generally re-
ffectual leader
ears as gover-
s now gained
spect for his
;e diverse fac-
bipartisan sup-
rams.
Ier
ur
iption
lay
)558

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FROM BIBLICAL TIMES
TO THE PRESENT
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by FEL IX FEBICH
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TICKETS AT DOOR

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FOR ENROLLMENT, CALL 769-4980:
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. . .. . . .. . . .

I

HIS CAMPAIGN leaflets head-
line no-fault insurance, door-to-
door sales regulations and new
landlord - tenant legislation as
being among the Governor's
more notworthy achievements.
Milliken's literature also em-
phasizes his accomplishments in
the area of tax relief.
"State taxes have lowered by
almost $500 million in the past
two years alone - the biggest
tax cut in Michigan's history,"
declares one well-circulated
pamphlet. "The Milliken tax re-
duction program has included
special help for the blind, the
disabled, farmers and senior
citizens."
AT THE same time, however,
Milliken has voiced his opposi-
tion to graduated income tax.
"I believe Michigan has one
of the most progressive flat rate
r* ThereSa ";
- difference!!! *.
PREARWEFOR: !
! MC~AT Over 35 years "
! of experience !
! and success
* Small classes .
* . u .
j L A Voluminous home *
study materials"
! GRE ""'"''''
0 Courses that are .
:A GS uethconstantly updated !
! IU M TE Tape facilities for !.
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* 'AT lessons and for use .
" of supplementary "
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! F E X Make-ups for
0 ECFMG missed lessons
NAT'L MED BDS i
! THOUSANDS HAVE 0
RAISED THEIR SCORES *
!

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5 c'
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P V 7.

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Were Celebrating the Opening of
1 /Y t
MOUTH U.
MEN'S FASHION CLOTHING
: SUITS
4 ;" Specially Priced at $98
Man of these suits sold regularly at $180
SPORTSCOATS
Specially Priced at $48
Many of these Sportscoats sold regularly at $85
NUNN-BUSH SHOES
i Specially Priced at $16
Many of these shoes sold regularly at $35
0*0mmTH U.

U IIIIERSITY ,
GHASTLY
BOOK SALE
\ CT29 NOV Z
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PurLhaSP
or mcv
a-!o s ' OFF
-Sat [O-S pa,(r ka e, LISTF ,i c- E-
-Sun [Z-5

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