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October 30, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-30

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, October 30, 1974

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, October 30, I 97~

U]

A
L
E
A
N
D
E
R

State

Rep.

race

hotly contested

GEORGE W. ALEXANDER believes:
"Judges must be in the foremront of re-
establishing the credibility of the legal
system. A court must not be used for
political protection of the establishment.
Judges should not protect lawyers from
the justified complaints of the people."
Non-Partisan Ballot
November 5th
for
15th District Judge
Committee to Elect Alexander
VIVIAN SHANE, Treasurer

(Continued from Page 1) years ago, says that if elected,
time." he would use his position as
With obvious pride, Bullard state representative to help or-
speaks of his efforts to place ganize women, minorities and
students on university governing community groups and "act as
boards, disband the state's anti- their spokesperson" in Lan-
subversive police unit and force sing.

E
r
i
i

more open government meet-
ings. But none of these actions
has been entirely successful.
WEAVER, who is employed
as Mayor James Stephenson's
administrative secretary, has
stressed women's issues in her
campaign. She says that mar-
riage and divorce laws must be
overhauled because they are
currently inequitable.
Giving vigorous backing to
the Equal Rights Amendment,
Weaver charges that Bullard
and the other legislators-in-
cluding the seven women now
serving in Lansing - have
"dragged their feet" on these
matters.

i
_ _.

i
E
i
1

Vietnam war veterans a mone- tinually kept him in the public
tary bonus. eye but not always favorably. j
With certain reservations and He -has lost the endorsement.
stipulations, the major candi- of former Democratic mayoral*
dates in the race support each candidate Franz Mogdis to
of the proposals. Weaver. Although Mogdis holdsI
Nearly everyone - including little real party power, his feel-
the candidates-grudgingly con- ings may be a barometer of
cede that Bullard is clearly the other moderate Democrat's
front runner and his defeat sentiments.
would be a notable upset. Similarly Bullard faced pri-
mary opposition this August

fered a similar round of criti-
cism for openly smoking a joint
in front of reporters and tele-
vision news cameras during the
annual Hash Bash on the Diag.
"That was a vivid demonstra-
tion of an issue," Bullard says
defending the action which out-
raged a number of legislators at
the time.
"Sure it cost me something
in the House," Bullard says,

I

HE ALSO urges decriminaliza-
tion of all drugs and "victim-
less" crimes, community con-
trol of police agencies, and in-
creased criminal rehabilitation
programs.
On many issues, Bullard takes
stands similar to those of HRP
in supporting economic reform
based upon graduated income
tax and guaranteed income.
Bullard, who received his law
degree from the University, also
advocates decriminalization and
a redefinition of personal free-
doms: "the government cannot
dictate what individuals do with
|their leisure time, controlled
substances and sexual activity."

~~

F'

Michigan Women's Studies Association
AND
Washtenaw Community College
PRESENT
A Conference on
Sex Discrimination in Education
Saturday, November 2, 1974

Recognizing a severe problem,
with the welfare system, Wea- BUT Alexander claims that
ver, a University graduate with there is a vast difference be-
an economics degree, advocates tween himself and Bullard be-
changes that will "eliminate fat- cause the incumbent "refuses
cat chislers" and free more to back up people in their
funds for senior citizens. struggles and give them assist-

DRAWN AS a "safe" Demo- from Washtenaw County Com- "but it was an important pol
cratic area, the 53rd district missioner Elizabeth Taylor, an- that had to be hammer
covers most of the city east of other radical Democrat. home."
Seventh St. and parts of Ann Bullard has been waging
Arbor and Ypsilanti Townships. THIS disaffection with Bullard confident, easy-going campaig
Thus included is the entire has in part been caused by two although he predicts his wi
campus area, downtown and of his nonlegislative activities ning margin will be small
outlying residential sectors since taking office. than two years ago. He attr
minus one heavily Republican Last April a student group utes this to a lower stude
section. supporting Bullard showed the turnout and post-Watergate d
Bullard handily won election movie Deep Throat on campus enchantment rather than a dr
to the House in 1972 by a wide to raise funds for his re-election in his own popularity.
margin over Republican and campaign. Unlike two years ago, HRP
HRP candidates after a hard The venture garnered national mounting virtually no campai
primary and an often bitter attention, the ire of the Board for state representative. Wh
general campaign. of Regents and about $1,300- Alexander remains confide
This year the race has been more than half the money Bul- other party members decla
a low key affair with far fewer lard spent in his primary con- that his chances of winning "a
posters, bumper stickers and test against Taylor. nil."
head - to - head confrontations BULLARD admits the event Weaver believes Bullard
among the office seekers. cost him support from some vulnerable and has been ru
feminists and traditional Dem- ning an aggressive door-to-do
DESPITE its less energetic ocrats who respectively viewed campaign coupled with hea
appearance, the contest has cen- the fund-raiser as blatantly six- media advertising. She ha
tered on Bullard and his brash ist and indecent. however, avoided direct co
personal style which has con- A year earlier, Bullard suf- frontations with Bullard.
U', GEO differ on uni form
hiring and firing procedures

rit
ed
a
gn,
in-
er
ib-
ent
is-
op
is
gn
ile
nt,
re
re
is
un-
or
vy
as,
on

4
r
i

ance in organizing."
SHE ALSO wants the state to Also appearing on
take a more aggressive role in is Ronald Graham of t
land use planning through broad can Independent Par
policy goals implemented on a whose candidacy ha
regional basis. solely a platform for h
A fifth grade teacher at Wil- u 1 t r a - conservative
low Run Elementary School, views.
Alexander pushes economic re- Graham favors an er
forms including nationalization welfare programs
of public utilities, a steeply 1,ADC, social security
graduated income tax, and a stamps which he con
guaranteed annual income for cialistic. "We do not
all families. government should

the ballot
he Ameri-
rty (AIP)
s become
is group's
economic
nd to most
including.
and food '
siders so-
ffeel the!
guarantee

TIME:

9 a. m.

to 3 p.m.

PLACE: Washtenaw Community College
Exact Science Building-Li

Alexander, a former Demo-
crat who joined HRP three
ANN ARBOR
WINTER ART FAIR
U. OF M. NEW FIELD HOUSE
IN FERRY FIELD
Entrance on State St.
10 a.m.-9 p.m.
Sun. 10-6
NOV. 1-2-3
FREE ADMISSIONE
over 150 artists & craftsmen

anything to anybody." By JIM TOBIN I doesn't protect our membership
and JEFF DAY in the very serious matter of
ON THIS year's ballot are discharge," D a v e Gordon,
three key proposals which wouldi In a two-and-a-half hour bar- spokesman for the Union said.
repeal the state tax on food and gaining session last night, ne-
prescription drugs, raise over a gotiators representing the Grad- But the two sides did come to
billion dollars for improved uate Employes' Organization an agreement in principle over
mass transportation and give (GEO) and the University re- a payroll procedure which will
- mained far from an agreement allow members to have union
S on the GEO demand for outside dues deducted from their pay
Board 7eetinqs arbitration on discharge pro- checks. The agreement will pro-
Action speaks louder cedures. bably be finalized during Fri-

f

The University once again re-
fused to sell the union computer
printed mailing labels address-
ed to members of the union.
But the University did admit
that it was reversing an ear-
lier promise to provide the la-
bels.
"We don't intend to provide
you with mailing labels that you

t!
G

For all Washtenaw County Elementary and High School Teachers
AND
ANYONE interested in this timely topic

than words .. .
FOJTIK
COMMISSIONER
Nov. 5 Democrat Dist. 14
Paid for by Fojtik for
Commissioner Committee

I dav's session.

I I

Currently, the responsibility "will use to drum up support for
for discharge lies within the your illegal strike activity,"
jurisdiction of each individual THE TWO sides moved closer
department a practice which to an agreement which would University lawyer William Lem-
the University hopes to con- inform graduateistudents not mer said.
tnercosuertin.orposi-!
un.ner onksiean for m Lemmer was referring to a
tions to look elsewhere for em-GEO poster which told its mem-
BUT THE union objects, say- ployment. bers to come to a meeting on
ing that individual departments But the University, express- contract demand and the pos-
have different standards and ed fear once again that such
that there should be an overall standardization of varying Uni- sibility of a strike.
policy. ( versity policies, woulo ne un- But the GEO denied that this
"The University position just workable. implied any actual strike plans.

i

II

I

Dimensions of Religious Experience
LECTURE AND DISCUSSION SERIES
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30, 3-5 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A
A WITCHES VIEW OF WITCHCRAFT-PAST & PRESENT, by Gundella,
a descendant of the Green Witches of Scotland and an active mqmber of
the Ann Arbor Coven.
ANGELL HALL - AUD. B.

I

WITCHCRAFT & THE OCCULT REVIVAL TODAY, by Dr. Marcello
Chairman, the Department of Sociology, EMU, specialist in occult
zation and sociology of the Bizarre.

Truzzi,
organi-

NEXT WEEK, Nov. 6, 3-5 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A
BEYOND DEATH-WITCHCRAFT AND
THE AFRICAN SPIRIT WORLD
By JEFF FADEMAN, Assistant Professor of African History, EMU, who
spent 18 months studying witchcraft among the peoples of Mt. Kenya.
Sponsored by the Office of Ethics and Religion, 3rd floor, Michigan Union, 764-7442

All In Love Is Fair
NANCY WILSON

ANDY KIM ° MERLE HAGGARD E
I presents His 30th Album

W alls and B rdges 10
JOHN LENNON

Hard core Poetry

f.
:,_ __
1.-
1

I

NEW COURSE OFFERING
Shakespeare's PERICLES: Four Points of View (University
Course 411, Division 495) One hour credit. No prerequisites
This mini-course centers around the University of Michigan Theatre Program's production of
Shakespeare's PERICLES starring guest artist Nicholas Pennell, who will repeat his role of
Pericles performed for the past two summers at Stratford Theatre Festival of Canada. This
production will be directed by William P. Halstead and performed November 27-30, in the
Power Center for the Performing Arts at 8:00 p.m. Tickets for the production may be
purchased at the box office of the Professional Theatre Program in the Mendelssohn Theatre
Building, phone (313) 764-0450.
Jack Bender, Professor of Speech is the co-ordinator for the humanities program, The course
consists of four lectures of the themes of "Reality, Fantasy, and Self-Delusion: The Human-
istic Search for Identity." The lecture schedule is as follows:

Fee and Easy

Dreams And All That Stuff
LEO KOTTKE e

ITVE MILLER BAND1
Antholog

The Low Spark of;
High Heeled Boys X

I

Tues., Nov. 5th

PERICLES: The Problems of the Play
MARVIN FELHEIM, Professor of English

$4009 A

9

,, 409

Tues., Nov. 12th Historian's View of Another Pericles
MARVIN BECKER, Professor of History

-4

Tues., Nov. 19th
Tues., Nov. 26th

THEEBAND
In oncert
BIG HALLOWEEN SALE!!!!

I ~ I

Mothers, Daughters, Virgins, Dawds
The Women in PERICLES
ELIZABETH DOUVAN, Professor of Psychology
Guest lecturer C. Lombari Barber, Professor of Eng-
lish at the University of California, Santa Cruz, will
speak on PERICLES

apple rscond3

6"an recods
ava,alefromr

AG S;9

0
Cap~.

F f l ,..-......
a
,

The director of the play will also discuss the historical background of the ploy at a rehearsal.
Time and date to be announced.
All lectures will be in the RACKHAM AUDITORIUM, except that of November
12th which will be in Lecture Hall 1, Modern Lonquaqe Buildinq. Lectures will

c

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