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October 27, 1974 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-27

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Page Eght

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 27, 1974

Injuries
By CLARKE COGSDILL more imp
On a day filled with nostalgia and down bet
bathos, nothing could have been more Beloit.
appropriate than the reincarnation of Stoll, g
the classic rivalry between Michigan slumped '
and Minnesota. Gophers and Wolver- he dipped
ines, huge, swift and fiery-eyed, have of timeles
often settled conference and national debacle."
championships in their clashes against run hard
one another. than we d
Of course, that didn't happen. The hausted wl
days when Michigan - Minnesota de- we just ca
cided anything more than the posses- THE M
sion of an over-eulogized sample of ing to ke
antique cheap crockery, are as dead as captive u
the Hudson Terraplane and Major elaborate.
Bowes Original Amateur Hour. "I gotk
YESTERDAY WAS Michigan's sev- even be p
enth straight victory over their once- out anyon
feared rivals. Of that series, only the ing on pu
1968 game, which Michigan won 33-20, proceeded
could be considered even reasonably examples.
close. Outside
Cal Stoll, incumbent Gopher master- denressed
mind, has lost his three clashes against ments. A1
Michigan by a combined score of 7-125. right unti
That one statistic, more than any sup- ONEA M
posed youthful irreverence for the past, and hisa
exnlains why the fabled battle for the could to,
Little Brown Jug has deteriorated into tioning, to
a footnote, slightly (but not much) mines wh

hamper Gophers

ortant than the annual show-
ween Carleton College and
gray-haired and pokerfaced,
way down low in his chair as
deep into the coaches' well
s cliches to explain the latest
"They block and tackle and
and they do it much better
do," he murmured in an ex-
'hisper." They do some things
an't do."
INNESOTA coach, not wish-
eep the assembled reporters
rtil next Wednesday, did not
kids out there who shouldn't
playing," Stoll continued with-
e disagreeing. "They're play-
ure courage," he added, and
to name a large number of
his cubbyhole was a sea of
players, tapes, and lini-
lot of those Gonhers won't be
i after post-season surgerv.
UST WONDER whether Stoll
assistants are doing all they
reduce this problem. Condi-
o a surnrising degree, deter-
ether a team in any sport will

be able to keep its 'players functioning
at their best throughout a long season.
Michigan, not noted for pantywaist.
gridiron antics, has suffered only one
truly serious injury: Larry Johnson's
strained knee ligaments. And even this
injury would have been much less se-
vere had Johnson not tried to return to
the lineup too soon.
"In order for The University of Mich-
igan to continue its excellence in foot-
ball," claims assistant coach Jed
Hughes, "we believe that well-condi-
tioned athletes are a necessity." There-
fore, Michigan's players are worked
throughout the year, in activities vary-
ing from time-honored windsnrints to
the fiendish Nautilus machine.
STRANGELY ENOUGH, most Mich-
igan players manage to struggle
through the season without injuries in-
terfering with their work. While career-
ending injuries (such as those suffered
by Craig Mutch and Kevin Master-
son) cannot be eliminated, thev can
be reduced, and the same holds true
for less serious physical problems.
Meanwhile, as his players prepared
to leave, Stoll tried to explain what
had gone wrong. "We thought if we
could play perimeter defense and hold

Franklin inside," he said, "we could
control the ball some ourselves.
"You can't let those people get on
the perimeter," Stoll continued.
They've got too much speed. If we
could have contained them more to the
inside, we sure wouldn't have lost by
any 49 points."
PROBLEM IS, it's not very plausible
that a team with inferior speed (the
Gophers) could win a series of foot-
races to the sidelines with any con-
sistency.
Surprisingly, Stoll did not seem to be
dismayed when it was pointed out that
during his three years in Gopherland
his team hasn't made any progress to-
ward closing the gap between them-
selves and the Maize and Blue. "No,
i'm not surprised," he said when ques-
tioned about the result, and later claim-
ed that "you give me all my kids
healthy and I don't know how well
t1,ev'd do out there."
But Stoll doesn't know how to keep
his players healthy. Until he learns
bow - and it is aoite definitely possible
-the Michigan - Minnesota rivalry will
continue its insinid course, producing a
grnwi'ng sken of 'nsatisfying routs.
Bring on Beloit!

Doily Photo by PAULINE"LUBENS
The correct way to tackle an end

wound

attac

...,_. -----_t i

roger.
over and ou
ROGER ROSSITER --

L"

Awesome Michigan...
.,,puts it all together
THE SCOREBOARD READ MICHIGAN 49, MINNESOTA 0. The
stats sheet read Michigan 620 total offensive yards, Minne-
sota 149.
The Michigan Wolverines' total domination of the thoroughly
outmanned Minnesota Gophers cannot be denied. The score
shows it, and the stats show it. The 96,284 strong homecoming
crowd saw a fired up Wolverine squad destroy the Gophers.
"This is just what we needed to propel us into the final
four weeks of the season," said a particularly jovial Michigan
coach named Bo Schembechler.
"We'caught Wisconsin at their absolute best last week and
won. I thought that game was good for us just like I think this
one was," Bo said.
Virtually everything Michigan tried, offensively and defen-
sively, worked. The fans got their rout, and the Michigan play-
ers can be proud because, as Schembechler put it, "they did it
the way they were supposed to."
The lopsided score will impress the pollsters, and the
Wolverines need that badly. Michigan's 27-16, 21-7, and 24-20
wins over Stanford, Michigan State and Wisconsin, respective-
ly, were making the Associated Press and United Press In-
ternational voters skeptical.
These select group of sportswriters and coaches don't like
to admit they have made mistakes. They like their top rated
teams to win by huge margins which, in their eyes and in the
eyes of many fans, signify a team's greatness.
What they fail to take into account are the relative strengthsj
and weaknesses among the teams each national power plays. If
Michigan and Ohio State playany Big Ten teams, except each
other, they have to roll up the big score. The 'Little Eight' all get
lumped together as a group of also rans in the pollsters' philoso-
phy.
That's not fair to Michigan or Ohio State. Minnesota
coach Cal Stoll's post-game commentary circles this short-
coming without really getting specific.
"We played with a lot of freshmen and a lot of injuries,"
he said. "Our freshmen are not ready to play Michigan, yet."
,Stoll finally gave in and made the comparison between
Michigan and Ohio State all the writers wanted.
"Let's face it, we gave Michigan a lot of easy points to-
day-a' blocked punt, fumbles and interceptions. We had all
snmmer to urenare for Ohio State. We played a better foot-
ball team the first week of the season."
Don't let Stoll's statement surprise you. Coaches don't al-
ways judge their opponents' strengths by comparing scores. Stoll
stated his oinion just like every Big Ten coach will after his'
team has played both Michigan and Ohio State. Their oinions
can be interesting, provocative and revealing. but they are also
merely oninions.
The Wolverines gained a lot more from yesterday's game
than a score could ever indicate. They finally got a superior
offensive and defensive performance in the same game.
"T'm more pleased with the defense than the offense," Schem-
bedhler said, and well he should be.
Minnesota's defense was a battered unit, nearly devoid
of veterans. By rights Michigan should have looked un-
stonopble offensively. Schembechler knew that as did Stoll,
though neither would say so. Not everyone was as tight
linned.
"I didn't think their defense could stop us," said strong
tackle Pat Tumpoane.
The Wolverine defense faced a much more formidable
foe, Gooher back Rick Upchurch. Upchurch, like Gayle Sayers
in his heydey, doesn't need a super offensive line to run
effectively. Stopping him was no mean accomplishment.
"We did a good job defensing Upchurch," Schembechler
said. "We had a good idea where he was all the time."
Upchurch had averaged 114 yards per game, but Michigan
held him to just 24. The Gopher speedster couldn't shake the
Wolverines' pursuit, and eventually Minnesota quit giving him
the ball, using him almost exclusively as a decoy.
Defensive tackle Jeff Perlinger, a Minnesota native, seemed
surprised at Minnesota's lack of physical exertion. "They sat
up, read the defense and leaned," he said. "They really didn't

(Continued from Page 1)
gan won by seven, or nine touch-
downs.
ACTING OUT the familiar
home script, the Wolverines
onened the afternoon onslaught
with a basic 70 yards-10 plays
touchdown drive right after the
referee's whistle. Lytle carried
five times for 28 yards before
the Wolverines stalled momen-
tarily with a third and two at
the Gopher 20.
Catching Minnesota napping,
quarterback Dennis Franklin
faked the option and handed to
wingback Gil Chapman on a
counter. Chapman broke into
the clear about three yards be-
yond the line of scrimmage and
waltzed into the end zone.
Michigan got the ball again on
a Gopher punt at midfield, but
three rushes left the Wolverines
a yard short of the first down.
Franklin,. whose tender ankle
hampered his mobility all day,
danced along the line of scrim-
mage, and just as a menacing
Blue-mungous!

Gopher was in pouncing posi-
tion, he pitched perfectly to
Lytle, who slashed for 38 yards
to the three.
However, the locomotive was
temporarily derailed when full-
back Chuck Heater fumbled in-
to the hands of Gopher end Jeff
Smith. "I wasn't hit hard," said
Heater, "I was just careless."
Quickly, the Wolverines rev-
ved up the grinder again, mov-
ing from their own 23 to the
Minnesota 33 before Franklin
overthrew tight end Greg Den
Boer on fourth down and one.
MICHIGAN gained 166 yards
in the opening quarter including
96 by Lytle, but the scoreboard
was less imposing, 7-0. The
Gophers didn't hang close for
long. The Wolverines took over
after a Frank Mosko punt and
powered 69 yards in 11 plays
for a second touchdown.
Lytle continued his workhorse
role with another 48 yards in
this drive as he burst through
some monstrous holes in the
Gopher defense. Franklin kept
them honest with a nine yard
pass to Chapman and a seven
yard gallop, but Heater got the
six pointer from a yard out.
Michigan increased the mar-
gin to 21-0 with a ten play, 87
yard march through the already
reeling Gophers. Bell, seeing his
first action of the game, con-
tributed 58 yards in five carries
and Franklin surprised every-
body with a rollout pass to
Heater for 14 yards, early in
the drive. The reception was
Heater's second as a Wolverine.
-Blue

Beri
Bell dove off tackle for the
final two yards.
SOON AFTER intermission,'
the final vestiges of Gopher re-
sistance were quashed when
the defensive end Larry Banks
blocked Mosko's fifth ;punt and
Rick Koschalk pounced on the
Thinclads frolic
The Michigan cross country
squad streaked to its sixth
consecutive season win yes-
terday in the United Nations
Day Cross Country Invita-
tional at Kent State. Led by
the individual winner Greg
Meyer, the thinclads mount-
ed 24 points to second place
Kent State's 78.
Over the six and one quar-
ter mile course, Meyer clock-
ed 30.17. Wolverine Mike Mc-
Guire finished second in
30.40. The top seven for Mich-
igan was rounded out by Bill
Donakowski fourth, Jay An-
staedt sixth, Keith Brown
11th, Jon Cross 13th and Jim
Simpson 18th.
pigskin on the Gopher 11. Two
plays later, Chapman tallied
his second touchdown of the day
from five yards away. Lantry's
extra point made it 28-zip.
Relentlessly, the Wolverines
began another march after the
Gophers failed to move. Frank-
lin controlled the throttle, hand-
ing to Lytle and Heater, and
throwing in a little 15 yard flip
to split receiver Jim Smith for
spice. The Wolverines moved to
icers
brawl in the third period, and
will be benched for the first
game against the Badgers.
The Wolverines opened up
very slowly. As in Friday night's
game, Ohio took a 1-0 lead in
the first period. Defenseman
John Israel took a shot on a
powerplay from the right point
that was deflected in front of
Frank Zimmerman, and trickled
through his pads for the tally.
The closest that the Wover-
ines came to scoring in that
first period was when Randy
Neal's shot from right out in
front and hit the post, with
15 seconds remaining.

I

MICH.
First downs 33
Rushing (att/yds) 78-521
Passing (att/com/int) 8-6-0
Passing yards 99
Funbles (no./lost) 4-2
Penalties (no./yds) 2-10
Punting (no./avg) 1-47

MINN.
35-100
4-12-2
49
2-.
4-38
9-36.41

s

G

op ers

the 23 before Franklin fumbled
and the Gophers recovered.
The setback was temporary,
however. Gopher quarterback
Tony Dungy, hoping to strike
quickly, aimed for receiver
Vince Fuller, but Wolverine de-
fensive back Tom Drake stepped
in for an interception. Drake
returned the ball 11 yards to
the Gopher 37 and after a per-
sonal foul was tacked on, Michi-
gan had the ball again, one
yard closer (at the 22) than
before the Franklin fumble.
EMPLOYING the same post-
turnover strategy as Dungy,
Franklin reared back and fired
a bullet to Smith in the end-
zone. 35-0.
The third quarter ended 35-0,
but on the second play of the
final period, Drake picked off
another Dungy pass at the
Michigan 48 and brought it back
three yards. Mark Elzinga,
rarely acclaimed for his run-
ning abilities had taken over
for Franklin and promptly stole
a page from Dennis' playbook.
Rolling left on the option, the
Gophers figured he would hand
off to a reliable trailing back,
but Elzinga kept it, turned up-
field and went all the way for
Michigan's sixth touchdown. The
49 yard run became Michigan's
longest run from scrimmage this
year.
After an exchange of punts,
the Wolverines added touch-
down number seven on a two
yard run by freshman fullback,
Scott Corbin.'
braw,
"Our timing was not good at
all," said Michigan coach Dan
Farrell after it was all over.
"Ohio State played a much bet-
ter game, though. Their fore-
checking was much improved
from Friday night. It was hard
for us to move the puck."
Ohio State came out carrying
the play in the second period
as well. Doug Boyd took a shot
from the point that was deflect-
ed by Hugh Prentice in front
of Zimmerman, who had little
chance to stop it because he
was screened.
But with five minutes left
in the second stanza, Mich-

W
ca
at
se
lif

Lytle
Bell
Heater
Corbin
E zinga
Chapman
Richardson
Franklin
King
Ceddia
Pride
Upchurch
Brady
Dungy
Trestman
Franklin
Elzinga
Dungy
Upchurch
Trestman
Den oer
Smith
Heater
Chapman

RUSHING
MICHIGAN
att. J
20
17
10
8
4
6
4
7
1
MINNESOTA
14
8
9
1
PASSING
MICHIGAN
att com
7 6
1 a0
MINNESOTA
10 3
1 1
1 0
RECEIVING

yds.
158
134
45
44
43
41
26
19
13
-2
78
24
15
-3

avg.
7.9
7.9
4.5
5.5j
10.7,
6.9
6.5
2.7
13.0
-2.0
5.4
3.0
5.0
-.3

Daily Photo by PAULINE LUBENS
OLVERINE TIGHT END Greg DenBoer makes a circus
atch of Dennis Franklin's first pass in yesterday's debacle
Michigan Stadium. The grab, which DenBoer juggled
veral times before eventually hauling in, shot some early
e into the homecoming crowd of 96,234.
past OSUC

14 -0 By FRED UPTON
The Michigan hockey team
int yds rallied from a 2-0 deficit and
o 99 scored twice in the third period
0 0 for a 4-2 victory last night over
2 41 Ohio State before 3,538 fans.
0 8 The victory enabled the
o o Wolverines to start the sea-
son with a two-game sweep
yds long over the non-conference Buck-
38 26 eye dekers.
37 22 But the game could turn out
10 10 to be costly next week when

MICHIGAI
MINNESOT

N
no y
2
1
1

r

Puclitel
Fuller
Pride

TA j Michigan faces Wisconsin. Both
2 16 8 R a n d y Trudeau and Doug
1 27 7 Lindksog were expelled because
0 0 o0- o of game misconduct penalties
7 14 14 14-49 due to the result of a 15 minute

MINNESOTA
MICHIGAN

From wire Service Reports
SUPER TAILBACK A r c h i e Griffin
churned 173 yards on 19 carries to match
an NCAA record as top-ranked Ohio State
crushed Northwestern 55-7 in a Big Ten
football victory yesterday which boosted
the Buckeyes record to 7-0.
Griffin, who left the runaway contest
midway in the third quarter, tied the rec-
ord of 17 consecutive 100-plus yard rush-
ing gains set by Oklahoma's Steve Owens
in 1968-69.
Northwestern, contributing to its own
downfall by having three intercepted pass-
es turned into touchdowns, engineered a
surprising 85-yard drive in 21 plays to gain
a 7-7 tie late in thetfirst quarter on Jim
Pooler's seven-yard touchdown run.

crush

wildcats

igan finally put the puck in After Morrison took care of
the net on a powerplay. Kris Boyd, both he and DougLind-
Manery shoved in his own skog went after Stergiou. Lind-
rebound from the corner 0i skog and Stergiou both received
the crease. game misconducts.
That seemed to light the fire After ten minutes, 'the re-
under the Wolverine team. feree and linesman finally
With but four seconds left in the took control of the action, but
period, Dave Debol cruised the not for long. Trudeau, whb
length of. the rink and circled had been a peacemaker by
behind the Ohio net, firing a holding back Morrison, went
pass to Randy Neal who put after Jim Kish. Both receiv-
it away for the tying goal. ed game scon n sk
Angie =Moretto scored twice Tog oh.Lnso n
ingthethirstanatoedutwhe Trudeau will be gone for Fri-
in the third stanza to put the day's action with Wisconsin,
gamne away for the Wolverines. Farrell 'said that "I think we'll
Manery took a shot from have the depth to make up for
the left side, and OSU goalie it. Tonight's game was a tough,
Dan Stergiou made a nice hard nosed game. You won't
save -but he couldn't con- find any more physical ones
trol the rebound. Moretto than tonights."
flagged the puck, waited until Moretto summed up the brief
Stergiou went down and back- two game series by stating,
handed it past the fallen goal- "We finally got some backup
tender.' goalies. It gives us that extra
The final goal came on a pow- bit of confidence that we need
er play. Greg Natale fired a to get rolling. It was a good
blazing shot that Moretto and weekend."
an Ohio defender deflected past FIRST PERIOD
Steri~tI SCORING: 1. 05u -Israel (All-
Stergiou. worth) 2:10; 2. osU-Prentice (Boyd,
Then a spectacular brawl Aliworths) 3:35:
began. Gary Morrison made SECOND PERIOD
blatnt hare, ammng oydd ISCORING: 3. M-Manery (Werner,
a blatant charge, rammig Boyd DeBol) 15:07; 4. M-Neal (DeBol,
into the boards.Bothwbenches werner) 19:56;
emptied and there were sev- THIRD PERIOD
eral major skirmishes all over D.sI 5. M-Morett (Maner
the rink. (Matale, McCahill) 8:33.
SCO R ES R

Big Ten
MICHIGAN
Ohio State
Michigan State
Illinois
Wisconsin
Iowa
Purdue
Indiana
Minnesota
Northwestern

Standings
W L T PF
4 0 0 118
4 0 0 190
2 1 1 100
2 1 1 76
2 2 0 90
2 2 0 73
1 3 0 75
1 3 0 68
1 3 0 45
0 4 0 50

PA
34
42
56
58
115
69
112
103
134
162

with 17 seconds remaining to lift under-
dog Iowa to a 14-12 Big Ten victory yes-
terday over Illinois.
Iowa, 3-4, had been stopped twice pre-
viously in the final quarter inside the
Illinois 20-yard line, but drove 49 yards
in 13 plays for the deciding touchdown.
DEFENSE DOMINATED the game be-
fore a Dad's Day crowd of 49,000.
Iowa finished with 240 yards net of-
fense and Illinois, which went into the
game averaging 373 yards, managed only
219, including just 55 in the last half.
FULLBACK KEN STARCH and tailback
Mike Morgan each powered for a pair of
touchdowns as Wisconsin fought back te-
nacious Indiana, 35-25, yesterday in ar
Big Ten football game.

their offense, but their offense is tre-
mendously explosive."
VERSATILE QUARTERBACK Charlie
Baggett ran for his fifth and sixth touch-

MICHIGAN 49, Minnesota 0
Ohio State 55, Northwestern 7
Iowa 14, Illinois 12
Wisconsin 35, Indiana 25
Michigan State 31. Purdue 7

3 Oklahoma 63, Kansas St. 0
I Alabama 41. TCU 3
Pittsburgh 13. Navy 11
Auburn 38. Florida St. 6
USC 31, Oregon St. 10

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