100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 27, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

LOOKING

BACK

I

THE WEEK
LSA changes
The months of work that went
into the Graduation Require-
ments' Commission final, con-
troversial report at last pro-
duced permanenttresults lastI
week when the literary college4
(LSA) faculty agreed to the
commission's recommendations
for a change in the distribution
requirement system.
At a special Monday night'
meeting, the faculty ended a
lengthy, intense debate on dis-
tribution with a vote in favor
of a new system allowing stu-
dents to plan distribution with an.
advisor. B.A. and B.S. candi-
dates will be required to spread
30 credit hours among the na-
tural sciences, social sciences,
and humanities outside their
major field.
The new system is described
as permitting students to adopt'
distribution courses that fit with'
their overall program. The plan
would be prepared at the end of
the student's first year and ap-
proved as a "contract" with
LSA.

suggesting quarter-time (t e n 1sight. The University says it.
INV E hours) teaching fellows get awill provide an official response
ER Vraise from $215 to $293. "It isI to GEO's money package on
a novel concept that someone, Nov. 8. Meanwhiue GEO is zaik-
of the new rule, requiring the working a quarter time should j ing about a strike deadline be-s
bulk of residency credits in the be fully supported," said phy-, fore the end of the winter.
last two years, would make it sics Prof. Lawrence Jones. Ne-
easier for students to choose gotiator Harold Jacobson argued lReforming the Regents
when to earn their residency. that the University could hire a R
The two rule changes were full-time professor for less than; Traditionally, a long list of1
another feather in the cap of the TFs want for four quarter- progressivetypes have berated
atnLS DenBly Fr ye,tiensrco. the University's governing
actng SA eanBily tme nstuctrs.Board of Regents for backward-,
who speaks in guarded tones Chief GEO bargainer Michele ness in decision-making, unfa-
about his chances for a perman- Hoyman shot back: "I really miliarity with the real preb-
ent appointment but has gotten dislike the levity on the other lems of the campus, and utter
faculty admiration for his hust- side. In the past we haven't lack of permanent student input.
ling on the GRC recommenda- been up against such severe But on Friday, the regents took1
tions. economic problems." a body blow from none other
Frye called Monday night's Hoyman contended GEO's for- than the governor's own Coin-
meeting to expedite work on the mula simply provided living in-, mission on Higher Education.
recommendations, which h a d come for TFs and added, "I'
bogged down in debate, seman- don't think that's something to THE COMMISSION urged,
tics, and lack of quorums. After laugh at."11 amending the state's consti-
the meeting, many faculty tution to turn the Regentspre-
' members congratulated F r yeAS IF TO stress their pint, sently elected on a state-wide
for moving the college forward. GEO introduced "possible basis, into a nine-member board
strike or other work action" as appointed by the governor. Fur-
listed topics of discussion on thermore, said the commission-
GEO hunkers down mass meeting leaflets. ers, all legal barriers blocking
week it became clear In negotiations on non-aca- the inclusion of a student regent
that theGraduat FEployes' demic issues, the two sides should be removed.

The commission's lengthy re-
port concluded that the regents
suffer "the lack of focus on dis-
cussion of educational issues"
during their election campaigns.
Commission staff director Rich-
ard Beers complained that ma-
jor parties often choose their
regent candidates "just to fill
the ballot or balance the ticket."
The Regents themselves r~p-
peared to split on partisan lines
when asked to respond to the
report. Democrats criticized the
proposed appointments method,
while some Republicans said
they had always favored sucn a
plan. President Robben Fleming,
who sat on the commission, said
he didn't care much either way.
Interestingly, Fleming would
not take issue with the repor s
description of the regents as a
somewhat inefficient body.
Fleming alsosaid he continues
to support the movement for
fully legalizing student regents.
That effort has now taken the
form of a bill which has passed
the house and now faces the
state senate.
-DAN BIDDLE

ATTEND
A
HALLOWEEN
PARTY
ATr
114 E. WASHINGTON
Downtown Location j
Th urs.,Oct. 31
WEAR A COSTUME
There will be
PRIZES & DANCING

Sunday, October 27, 197
4th ANNIVERSARY SALE
Oct 30-Nov. 9
oJurkish Arts &Gi'fts
13 Handmade, Finest Quality
Odorless, Suede, Hooded
SHEEPSKIN COATS
MAXI-Reg. $199.50 ... NOW $135.75
C CARCOAT-Reg. $149.50 ... NOW $95.50
13 (Different moors and styles)
O Handmade Jewelry, Hand Knit 100% Wool
Colorful Gloves and Socks. Copper Work, Rugs, o
Carpets and Tapestry, etc.
LAYAWAY FOR CHRISTMAS
PRICES: %-11 OFF
215 E. LIBERTY (near Sam's)
10:30 a.m.-6:00 p.m.
761-5554
..1 ..-.-0i- 0(-01-:>0-_1::o

ri

0

' Organization (GEO) and the, made some progress lastwa
University face at least another despite the University's inran-
month of hard bargaining before sigence of GEO demands for an
the 1600 teaching fellows, r e - agency shop, class size limits,
searchers, and assistants repre- and affirmative action plans.

r
AUTHENTIC

In the words of Charles Mor- sented by the young union get
ris, director of LSA counseing themselves a contract. T h e
and a strong supporter of the . union publicized its demand for
new distribution system, "Stu- a budget-busting 25 per cent
dents can now have a voice in across-the-board pay hike, ac-
the structure of their own pro- companied with the long-stand-
grams." ing GEO platform of free tui-
tion for teaching fellows, a n d
7HEFACULTY also voted to several new demands for fringe
change LSA credit-in- resi-be
dence requirements, lowering benefits.
the limit of non-University cre-' Needless to say, that fueled
dits from 75 to 60. That means the fire. At Thursday night'sj
it will be tougher for stude its bargaining session, University
to earn with transfer, cor:es- negotiators chided the TFs for
pondence, extension, off-campus
independent study, credit-by-
exam, or advance placement
credits.
But several faculty members
pointed out that another aspect|l
- --

Discrimination charges made by

the union, it was agreed, will
go to binding arbitration.
But the fight over wages con-
tinued with no middle ground in
* N WiLL Rf LZCI
SAG SA& ~t- Q.
-Pd. Pol. Adv.

A UTHEN TIC
MANDARIAN CUSINE
HUNG WAN
RESTAURANT
4*4

i

* 971-9500
Tues., Wed., Thurs.:
4:30 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
Fri., Sat., Sun.:
11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m.
CLOSED MONDAYS
GEORGETOWN MALL
2560 Packard Road

Mon.-Tues.
No Cover
BEER /2 off
PRESENTS
THUR., FRI., SAT.
KRAMERS
KREAMERS

.

FRIDAY, Nov 8, at 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, Nov. 9, at 2:30 p.m. and 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, Nov. 10, at 2:30.p.m.
EVENING PERFORMANCES $2.50, MATINEES $1.50
Frickets on sale this week in Mendelssohn Theater Lobby 10-1 & 2-5. Group rates available.
For information call 764-6273

MONEY BACK
GUARANTEED!
Examination Tutoring
LSAT, GRE,
DAT, and MCAT
TEST CENTER
662-3700

Ann Arbor, Mi

ichigan

0I

r

IM

Paid Political Advertisement

11

Ann Arbor's most
colorful nightclub

341 S. MAIN

769-5960

ANN ARBOR

[iJ

ommome

this is

ELECT

RAE WEAVER

on

An open letter from supporters of
Congressman Marv Esch to John Reuther

THE PRESENT STATE FINANCIAL
SYSTEM ASSISTANCE PROGRAM
.1... under this system non academic achievers from middle
income families who would normally qualify for financial
assistance from the state are being passed over and there-
fore, are unable to attain complete academic careers." This
polic y should be changed

I

53rd Dist.

Paid Political Ad.
Douqj. Crary/Treas.

Rep. St. Rep.

I

Dear John:
In these last two weeks of the campaign, if you're going to tell it
like it is, tell it all.
You have said Congressman Esch receives many contributions
from doctors. You didn't say that on the three votes that the
U.A.W. called key health votes, Congressman Esch voted for
what the U.A.W. considered "in the health interests of his
constituents."'
Tell it like it is, John.
You say Congressman Esch has received special interest money
and is therefore dominated by these interests. But you know that
Ralph Nader in his study on Congress said "Congressman Esch is
literally his own man.'
Tell it like it is, John.
You have tried to raise the specter of special interest money
buying a Congressional seat for Marv Esch. Yet as of August 31st
you had received $15,000 from the unions, of which over $9,000
came from the U.A.W.
Tell it like it is, John.
Tell it like it is, John. You chose the wrong district to run in. As the
Ypsilanti Press said, "we have trouble forgetting he's a Johnny-
come-lately."

ROYAL SCOT
Pound Hamburger
with Cheese,
French Fries, Large Coke
All for Regular
only t$1.30

Supporters of Congressman Marw Esch

AIuN r% --. - j *3,rCh

1 -'

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan