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October 26, 1974 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-26

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Saturday, October 26, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

rage F ve

Satuday Octber26,1974THEMICHGANDAIY i-ageli1

Bromberg edges out

BURSLEY HALL ENTERPRISES
presents
MARX BROS.
DUCK SOUP
and
A DAY AT THE RACES

SHFwl
By STEPHEN HERSH
Although he was billed as a
"guest artist" at last night's
Homecoming concert starring
Souther, Hillman and Foray,
the audience belonged to David
Bromberg.
Bromberg has carved out a
pretty secure place for himself'
as Ann Arbor's favorite folkie.
The Homecoming show was re-
ferred to in advance around
town as his show, not as the
SHF concert.
So it didn't take long for the
bushy-haired and bespectacled
Bromberg and his band to make
friends with the moderate-ca-
pacity Hill Auditorium crowd.
The singer's renowned sense of
mirth came across loud and
clear, nicely complimented, by
the s e n s e of cameraderie
exuded by his group. The atmos-
{phere was decidedly relaxed.
So the abrupt transition to theI

th light touch
ray ciousness of the Souther, Bromberg's facetious manaer,
Hillman and Furav band was his rolling chord picking and
a bit hard to handle. his pleasant solo work on the
The three leaders of the group guiar were unqualifiedly heart-
are veterans of Buffalo Spring- warming. He doesn't have the
field and Poco, and while their technical facility of, say, Django
sound resembles the styles of Rheinhardt on the melody lines,
the two earlier groups, its kin- but he has a nice, light touch
ship to that of the Springfield and is relatively fast with the
ends there. The delicate har- fingers.
monic delicacy of that group, The two violinists and two
which blossomed further in the hornplayers, especially sax man
work of Crosby; Stills, Nash and Billy Novack, played excellent
Young, is absent. solos, t e n d i n g towards the
jazzy. Novack performed some
The band's sound is as tight raspy riffs in the fashion of
and polished as Poco's, and it's rhythm 'n' blues tenormen of
strongest aspect is the articulate the 50's, and some subdued
solo work of, Carl Perkins on passages in the style of the
electric and pedal steel guitars. hornmen of the big bands of the
The ensemble playing was at 30's, interspersing an abundance
it's best during the country of unexpected notes in the man-
numbers. ner of Eric Dolphy.
The Bromberg band, too, was The audience brought B om-
most engaging during its coun- berg back for two encores.
try tunes. But it's work was Souther, Hillman and Furay
consistently pleasing. were only called back for -one.

Bursley West. Cafe.
Sat., Oct. 26

9:00 p.m.
Adm $1 .00

Must oresenf U-M l.D. for admission

FOUND
through
For prompt
service
CALL
764-0557

Daily Photo by KAREN KASMAUSKI
Daivid JBromberg

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7

Love's Labours Lost': Fast action
geared for modern day viewing

By CINDY HILL
Since it was originally per-
formed for Queen Elizabeth on
Christmas day, 1597, scholars
have traditionally considered
Shakespeare's "Love's Labours
Lost" almost painfully aristo-
cratic.
Perhaps so, but this weekend's
City Center performance of
the play was definitely for mod-
ernday groundlings, with plenty
of slapstick and lusty buffoon-
ery.
All in all, it made enjoyable
evening fare, with some shining
performances and brilliant di-
rectorial touches to carry the
evening.
The play did suffer from
some flaws, however, signally
a few over-characterizations
and a few scenes of self-con-
scious comedy that marred the
delicate flavor of the bard's
parody on courtly love and man-
ners.
The plot is typical Shake-
spearean silliness, with an abun-
dance of mistaken identities and
mixed-up messages.
The comedy takes on a bitter
note, however, with the alter-
nate spoofing and upbraiding of
courtly love.

MARY LOU ROSATO (left) as Rosaline and Mary-Joan Negro
(right) as the Princess of France continue in the Mendelssohn
Theatre's production of Shakespeare's "Love's Labour's Lost"
tonight at 8 p.m. and tomorrow at 7 p.m.

MOVIES on IEEVISION_
by MICHAEL WILSON
Gruesome special effects high- miere telecast of Irwin Allen's emotionally compelling Bronx
light this afternoon's Channel 2 box-office smash The Poseidon blockbuster about a butcher and
thriller at 3 entitled The Deadly Adventure (1972), a disaster ve-I his problems.
Mantis (1957), a tribute to Hol- hicle that features Gene Hack- The Phantom of the Opera
lywood's special effects depart- man, Ernie Borgnine and 3hel- (1962) plays Channel 9 Thursday
ment that coud have been more ley Winters among many other at 1 p.m., with Herbert L o m
appropriatey named The Mantis passengers aboard a New Year's excellent in this grim and very
That Ate Manhattan. Only 30 eve ship turned upside down. Gothic sixties version of the
minutes later on 13 Greg Peck It's so bad it's camp, and I classic masked man tale. Cold
and Bobby Darin turn in have a sneaky feeling that this Turkey (1971) is telecast on
bravura performances for Cap- prime-time (9 p.m. on 7) ama- Thursday night at 9 on 2 for
tain Newman, M.D. (1964), an teur hour might just walk off the first time, starring D i c k
epgrossing and well-told tale with the highest ratings for the Van Dyke and Bob Newhart as
about the Air Force psychiatry season. Whatever you do don't residents of a town that must
business with Eddie Albert, miss the 12:15 Channel 7 shock- quit smoking for a whole month
Tony Curtis and Angie Dickin- er Sunday night, Seconds (1966), to cop $25 million from s o m e
son in lesser roles. directed with flair by J o h n crazy humanitarian who thinks
Later tonight at 8:30 on Chan- Frankenheimer and starring the they can't do it. It's got a nice
nel 4 you can watch Hayley usually bland Rock Hudson i a theme sang by Randy Newman
Mills play twin sisters twice in socko role as a middle-aged busi- and some good laughs from pro-
the classically putrid Parent nessman who submits . to an ducer-director Norman Lear.
Trap (1961). operation for a second shot at
life. The supreme spotlight must
The only 'real cinematic win- shine on Thursday night's Chan-
ner Saturday night is aired on Monday's sole offering of any nel 2 11:30 thriller theatre pre-
Channel 50 at 11:30 - The Day quality consists of the one and sentation, Frankenstein Meets
the Earth Stood Still (1951). only Groucho Marx in a fable the Wolf Man (1943), one of tnc
about diamonds and detectiveso
Patricia Neal and Michael Love Happy (1949) - the rest of best monster movies ever made.
Rennie star in this excellent the brothers Marx are only Lon Chaney and a whole cas~ of
space yarn that is told with sub- around periodically as Groucho freaked-out extras romp around
tle style and amazing grace, steals the show with the help in this extremely weird film,
much unlike the other sic-fi ofa thenyun adbatiful
specials produced at that time. a en-young an eauiu with Lugosi departing from his
Marilyn Monroe in a cameo role Dracula-mold and portraying
Sunday has an old favorite
telecast at 4:30 p.m. on Channel that lasts only thirty seconds on Frank with some of the nicest
11 when Liz Taylor and Mickey this 11:30 p.m., Channel 50 high- close-ups you'll ever see in a
Rooney star in the marvelous light. Monster Mash.

And as the alternately angry
and lovestruck Berowne, whose
struggle to win Rosaline is the
focus of the play, Sam Tsoutsou-
vas shines with a vibrant and
passionate portrayal.
Mary Lou Rosato as the barb-
tongued Rosaline and Mary-
Joan Negro portraying the
princess, gave appropriately
crisn and cutting performances
as they slowly dissected their
would-be lovers with incisive
one-liners.
David Schramm was also ex-
cellent as Boyet, the foppish,
blase courtier who serves as the
sole miale hub in the princess'
court's limited universe.
Unfort'matelv, their easy
charm and witty banter was at
odds with the occasionally
strained, frantic comedy of oth-
er scenes, particularly those be-
tween Armado (portrayed by
Nicolas Survov), Moth (Robert
Bacigalupi) and occasionally
Costard (Roy Stevens) as well.
Part of the fault lies with the
script. Shakespeare's wit seems
to wa x in the scenes between
the male and female courts, and
wanes in the above-mentioned
scenes.
Apparently to compensate, the
pace and timing of th'ese scenes
were accelerated, and the re-
suilt is often frenetic and frenzi-
ed rather than funny.
Happily, the plot itself picks,
up after the second act, and
these flaws disappear.
Some of Director Gerald
Freedman's scenes are inspir-
ed - like the one where the
lovesick courtiers heave and'
sigh about the stage, and wind
up embarrassedly trying to
swallow their billet-loux. And
the final scene makes the entire
trip worthwhile.
The play continues through
Sunday at the Mendelssohn
Theatre.
j-'
$2.50 8:0
FRI.-SAT.-SUN.
UNITED ARTIST'S
BIFF ROSE

WEST
A Q J 8 4 2
V K J 8 6
f 8
.64 2

EAST
A 7 6 3
v 9 3
* A7 64
.s. K 10 8 3

SOUTH
I4A5
SA Q 4
5 2
4i A Q J 9 5
The bidding:;

BRIDGE:
De::larer forgot to look a gft
horse in the mouth, and it cost
him his contract.
NEITHER VUL.
NORTH
A K 10 9
V 10 7 2
* K Q J 10 9 3
.. 7

and saw that he had no way
back to the board, so, he play-
ed the ace and queen of ciubs
out of his hand. East won his
king and led another heart. This
time South put in his oueen,
which lost to the king, and won
the heart return. Now he cash-
ed the jack of clubs, but when
the 10 did not drop, h : was
forced to concede the setting
trick to East before he could
claim the rest.
S:>lth fell victim to th, ilis-
ion of the free trick. True, the
opening lead presented him with
a trick that he could never have
developed by himself, but only
ct the cost of his contract.
If declarer stops to count his
tricks he will find that he has
o'lv eight if he wins the spade
nine, three spades, one heart,
one diamond, and mast likely
three clubs. Therefore, when the
nice of spades holds the first
tri::k, declarer must spurn its
siren's call and overtake with
his ace. Now, when he establish-
ed dummy's diamonds, he will
have an entry to ne board to
enjoy them. This line of play
will yield nine tricks and his
contract in the form of two
spades, one heart, five diamonds
and one club.
fi 4 OPIOSW iLL
ir~agiative OLJTZ I
C1tPd . a l.

---

IL l

I

Deadline is noon one (1) day in advance

South
1 NT
Pass

West
Pass
Pass

NJorth
3 NT
Pass

E ist
Pass

Opening lead: four of spades
When dummy's nine of spades
held the first trick, South was
quick to claim this gift by plAy-
ing small from his hand. He now
yet about establishing dummy's
diamond suit, leading the king
Sfrom the board.
When both his opponents play-
ed low to the king, he continued
with the queen. His right hand
opponent won this trick wtti the
ace as West pitched a spade,
and shifted to the nine of hearts.
Not having anything better to do
declarer ducked to the board's
10, but West won his jack and
switched back to spades.
South won his ace of spad.es

B'eware' of
Greeks
bearing gttifts.
by FRANK BELL --

FREE MOVIE!
The Life and limes
of Judge Roy Bean
PAUL NEWMAN
i., 7:301 9:30 Sa
25 NAT. SCI. AUD. Oct

I

Fr
Oct.

it.2
. 26

&RAfSTA Ot~ulWi ha . MC.

_______________________ _-_ -q

CINEMA II in assciation with
Ann Arbor Film Cooperative presents
Ann Arbor Premiere
Bernadette LaFont * Jean-Pierre Leaud
Francoise Lebrun

"Jean Eustache shows the influences
not only of Bertolucci and Rohmer
but also of Godard and Warhol in
a work that is nevertheless very
much his own. There's a stark beauty
and honesty. His leading players are

National Velvet (1944) a heart-
throb concerning one horse, oae
jockey and one girl's love fir
both.
Night Train to Munich (1940),
one of the best English suspensej
thrillers ever made, airs Sun-
day at 5 p.m. on 50 with Rex
Harrison and Margaret Locx-
wood in an incredibly compli-
cated story about a secret for-1
mula the Nazis want that a
young scientist's daughter won't
give up. Carol Reed directod
this monumental masterpiece
that also stars Paul Henreid -
don't miss it.
Sunday night marks the pe-
Wa nted: I

's
'11
i
r
. 1
.f
c
.
t

Bill Kennedy screens An Af- Wrapping up a long week of
fair to Remember (1957) at 1 television viewing is Frtday
p.m. Tuesday on 50 with Cary night's 9 p.m. Channel 2 pre-
Grant and Deborah Kerr, about sentation of Mike Nichols' The
a mistakenly separated couple Graduate (1967), which al-
that still love each other. though hacked to bits by the TV
Wednesday afternoon you can censors still thankfully delivers,
catch Ernest Borgnine on Bill with a cast that includes Annej
Kennedy's Channel 50 1 p.m. Bancroft, Dustin Hoffman, Ka-
Showtime in Marty (1955), an therine Ross and Buck Henry.

impeccable in their revelation
self!"

of

comedian-singer-
songwriter
"brilliant-better than
ever. -Denver Post
1411 0Nil STREET
VM'Sa

---JUDITH CRIST, New York Mooozine
JEAN EUSTACHE'S
OT m

MIDTERMS-ALIENATION WEEKEND
{ JAMES DEAN as a 1956
REBEL WITHOUT A CAUSE
~' JAMES DEAN is the new boy in high school but has problems relating with

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