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October 26, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-26

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Saturday, October 26, 1974
U.S. explains

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pane Three

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pace Three

Thieu regime to dismiss

SALTu
MOSCOW (Reuter - Secre-
tary of State Henry Kissinger
yesterday explained American
ideas on a new Strategic Arms
Limitation (Salt) agreement to
Soviet Communist Party Chief
Leonid Brezhnev.
There were no immediate de-
tails of the U. S. suggestions
nor of the Soviet reaction, al-
though Kremlin officials are
understood to have been indi-
cating they did not regard the
SALT problem with the same
urgency as Kissinger.t s
The Secretary' of State and
Brezhnev met twice during the
day to follow up Thursday's
seven hours of discussions,
which were devoted largely to
bilateral relations, the Middle
East and the slow-moving Euro-
pean statement said the morn-
ing talks yesterday between Kis-
singer and Brezhnev had taken
place in "a very friendly and
very cordial atmosphere" and
lasted for two-and-a-half hours.
U.S. officials said yesterday's
talks were largely devoted to
SALT - a topic Kissinger is
understood to regard as being
at the core of the detent pro-
cess that both countries have
pledged to continue energetical-
ly.
Although no information wasj
released on details of the talks,
Kissinger is known to have
come to Moscow hoping to work
out guidelines for discussion on
a new agreement that could be
formally approved at a summit
between Brezhnev and Presi-
dent Ford.
THE SUMMIT is believed to
be in the forefront of Soviet
thinking at the moment, and a
time and place for it - prob-
ably the last week of Novem-
ber in the far east - are ex-
pected to be announced before
Kissinger leaves for India to-
morrow.

lans
Most signs in Moscow sug-
gest that the Soviet leadership
will not move on to any sub-
stantive consideration of SALT
until they have a chance to
assess Ford's commitment to
detente at first hand.
This appeared to be confirm-
ed by the composition of the So-
viet side at the talks yester-
day.
ABSENT WAS Defense Minis-
ter Marshal Andrei Grechko,
who sat in on SALT discussions
during Kissinger's visit here in
March. Brezhnev was'only ac-
companied by Foreign Minister
Andrei, Gromyko, Soviet Am-
bassador to Washington Anatoly
Dobrynin and a senior ForeignI
Ministry official.
In Kissinger's group was
Helmudt Sonnenfeldt, the Sec-
retary of State's close adviser
on defense matters, and other
arms and security experts.
When Kissinger came to Mos-
cow in March, he had hoped
to achieve what he then term-
ed "a conceptual breakthrough"
on strategic arms - an accord
which would set the basis for
a new round of discussions to
extend the 1972 SALT agree-
ment.
BUT THIS did not material-
ize, apparently because the Rus-
sian view on parity in weaponry
did not match the AmericanE
ideas, and the Secretary of
State has been more reluctant to
expound his ideas publicly this
time.
However, it is known he wants
an agreement that would cover
the period from 1975 through
1985 that would make it possi-
ble to at least slow down the
spiral in the arms race
threatened by the development
of new multiple-headed wea-
pons.

377

senior officers

SAIGON W) - President consider the national interest tinued fighting since the cease
Nguyen Van Thieu's government above his egotistical one," he first months ago, unemploy-
handed 377 senior officers their said. "If he will not volun- ment, inflation, corruption at the
walking papers yesterday in ano- tarily step down, I am afraid highest levels, and Thieu's fail-
ther bid to still critics at home that the revolutionary mood is ure to keep his promise to re-
and abroad and win more U.S. growing in South Vietnam . . . store civil liberties.
aid dollars. There should be some kind of It is the most serious politi-
The opposition wasn't very popular revolution.' cal dissent Thieu has faced in

impressed, and one lawmaker But Tuyen said the opposition'
said if Thieu doesn't quit volun- was not yet broad enough to oust
tari]y, he may face a revolu- Thieu because the president has
tion. the army and police under his
The Defense Ministry said the thumb.
majors and colonels will be fir- Former Senate President
ed over the next two months for Nguyen Van Huy said he con-
corruption, and that an addi- sidered the firing of the four
tional number of junior officers cai.et miitee rrlttle
also will be sacked for dishon- cabinet ministers "a very little
esty, but didn't say how many. event."f
"It is not enough to change the
IT WAS THE Thieu regime's mood of the people," he said.
second action in 24 hours design-'
ed to improve a sagging image. "IF PRESIDENT Thieu really
On Thursday, Thieu fired four wIF PREImENT The really
cabinet ministers, including his wants to improve the present
+n- niry T....2,-.v ......,: , . itar t iot n he p mt fiorini r tnlr

three years. In order to streng-
then his position he is bending
to U.S. pressure for reforms to
give the Ford administration
some leverage in seeking to
restore aid cuts.
Congress cut military aid to
South Vietnam from a requested
$1.45 billion to $700 million for
the current fiscal year. T h e
Ford administration is asking
for $750 million in economic aid
but this is expected to be trim-
med by as much as half when
final congressional action is
completed.

cousin, information m iisteri mJCvni us seriousy a e THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Hoang Duc Nham. account of what has been said Volume LXXXV, No. 45
Government officials said they during the protest movement. Saturday, October 26, 1974
anticipated more changes, most Replacing four ministers is not is edited and managed by students
aieyiatdme cane, h at the University of Michigan. News
likely in the cabinet, in t h e a solution. President Thieu must phone 764-0562. Second class postage
coming days. ';make true reformspaid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
,beginningPublished d a 11y Tuesday through
But initial reaction from the with the high ranking military Sunday morning during the Univer-
opposition indicated Thieu had d " sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
not gone far enough to reverse Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
the erosion of confidence in the Opposition politicians, B u d- $r1tea mal (Marriec ampus a);
military and to stop the econ- i dhists, Catholics and segments $12 non-local mail (other states and
- foreign).
omy's slide, of the Vietnamese press have summer session published Tues-
been demanding that Thieu re- day through Saturday morning.
OPPOSITION DEPUTY Tran sign in protests over the last Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
Van Tuyen called on Thieu to! (campus area); $6.00 local matt
Tseven weeks. (Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
resign. "We hope that Presi- local mail (other states and foreign).
dent Thieu is wise enough to THEY ARE ANGRY over con-

AP Photo

Cypriots demonstrate
Greek Cypriot students march through Nicosia yesterday asking for United Nations help to
free Cyprus from Turkish occupation. The' demonstrators chanted anti-American slogans and

demanded withdrawal of Turkish
LOS ANGELES (UPI)-When
Maury Wills set the modern
base stealing record of 104 in
1962 he was thrown out only 13
times.

invasion forces.

PARALLELS U.S. WOES:

Shoppers
wa (loped
CHATILLION - SUR - SEINE, 500-gram
France (R) - The F r 3 n c h a little o
housewife trying to do the fain- about $1
ily grocery shopping faces the a year a
same kind of inflation that has an incr
hit her American counterpart. pound o
Prices for some supermarket $1.20 in1
items have gone up more than an incre
30 per cent in just under a year cent.
according to an Associated Press In the
spot check. survey s
Supermarkets have only re- generall:
cently gained popularity in Eur- pound ar
ope and many consumers still $1.29. Po
prefer to get their meat from clinings
the butcher shop and their fruits farmers
and vegetables from a small high cos
produce store - or from their their liv
own gardens. crease i
ily lower
A check of the shelves of a Prices
medium-size supermarket in have ris
this small town about a two- An 875-g.
hour drive from Paris showed tergent
several sights unfamiliar to an - went
American consumer: a sparse- $1.04 in
ly stocked produce department, 34 per c
a meat counter featuring dis- so have
plays of tripe but no hambur- ed State
ger. , higher m

in France
by inflaion

Elect RON STRAUSS
County Commissioner, District 14
"Since my opponent took office two years ago
crime in the county has doubled. Last year our
county was the first in Michigan, and ninth in
the country in total number of forcible rapes
per 100,000 people! Victims are helped very
little; they are harassed and abused; embar-
rassed, and asked unnecessary questions. We
further need v i c t i m compensation for such
crimes. Why hasn't my incumbent opponent
acted on this in the last two years?"
Brouaht to you by the Democrats for Strauss
Paid for by the People. for Strauss

~LUV~L~not litera~
F BONNIE RAITT
STREETLIGHTSJ AA

package of butter -
ver a pound - that cost
1.30 at the same store
ago, was priced at $1.49,
ease of 14 per cent; a
f pork chops that cost
1973 was $1.55 this year,
ease of almost 30 per
United States, an AP
howed that butter prices
y were under $1 per
nd pork chops cost about
rk prices have been de-
in the United States as
unable to afford t h e
t of feed grain, sell rff
estock, producing an in-
n supply and tempor.r-'
,r prices.
of nonfood items also
sen sharply in France.
'ram lox of laundry de-
- almost two pounds
from 78 cents in 1973 to
1974 - an increase of
ent. Detergent prices al-
been rising in the Unit-
es generally because of
nanufacturing costs.

sumers who learned this week'
that rising prices for food, cloth-
ing and mortgage rates push-
ed up the cost of living by 1.2
per cent in September. Prices
last month were 12.1 per cent
higher than they were a year
earlier - the worst 12-month
increase in 25 years.
Farmers throughout the Unit-
ed States and Europe comph.n
that despite the rising consumer
prices they are losing money.
Members of the National Farm
Organization in the United
States slaughtered 636 calves in
Wisconsin last week to protest
that they claimed were l o w
prices for their livestock.
AT THE same time, the peo-
ple who sell the meat say they
can't afford to lower prices.
Butchers in Belgium have stag-,
ed two protest shutdowns com-
plaining about a government or-
der to cut the price of meat.
The oldest student enrolled in
the University in 1972 was 74-
years-old. The youngest was 15.
ACNE SCARS, PITS
FRENCH H ERBAL HOME SKIN

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i nduJcs:Rainyj [My Man I (Got Plenty
"'hat Is Succss Ge(Vim'n oMy Mind

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29h
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Randy Newmn
Good Old Boys

1235 S. University . 668-9896
300 S. State . 665-3619
M-Th 10-9; Friday: 10-Midnite
sat: 10'.9; Sunday: 12-6

0

A

p

THE PRICE increases, how- THE INFLATION problem is
ever, are all too familiar. A nothing new to American con-
DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Day Calendar Nov. 5: Blue Cross of Mich., Con-
Saturday, October 26 tinental Oil Co., Mich. Bell (Speciai
Football: Homecoming, U-M vs. sched. for minorities & women),
Minnesota, Stadium, 1:30 pm. Southern Methodist U./Law; Wed.
Hockey: U-M vs. Ohio State,'Yost Nov. 6: N. Y. U./Grad Sch. of Arts
Ice Arena, 7:30 pm. & Sci.; Thurs., Nov. 7: Dun & Brad-
Musical Society: The Pennsylvania street, Inc., wayne State U./Person-
Ballet, Power, 8 pm. nel Dept., Columbia U./Grad. Sch.
Music School: DMA Piano Series, of Bus., Washington U./Law &
Ha-Chiu Yee,, piano, Recital Hall; Bankers Life & Casualty Co.; Fri.,
Contemporary Directions, Rackham Nov. 8: Upjohn & Vilianova U./Law
Aud.; both at 8 pm. Boston U./Sch. of Law scheduled
City Ctr. Acting Company: Shake- late for visit, Wed., Oct. 30. Stud-
speare's Loves Labour Lost, Men- ents interested in Foreign Service:
delssohn, 8 pm. John Mellor of U.S. State Dept.,
Career Planning & Placement Commercial Counselor at Amer. Em-
3200 SAB, 764-7456 bassy in Ottawa, Canada will be at
Interviewing on campus: Mon., CP&P Oct. 25. Phone 764-7456 visit
Nov~. 4: Northwestern U./Grad. Bch.jorspinR.30SA at2 m
of Mgt., U. of washington/Grad. or stop in Rm. 3200 SAB at 2 pm
Sch., Vanderbilt U./Law; Tues., for meeting.
The Israeli Folk Festival '14
$TARRING
VslaaYdioni
The Adler Trio Gadi Sion The Sobiro
DATE: Monday, October 28, 1974
TIME: 8:00 P.M.
PLACE: The Power Center for the
Performing Arts
PRICE: $3.50, Student Discount $2.50

Warhols
ANDYWARHOLS "FRANKENSTEIN"'. A Fim by PAUL MORRSSEYe A CARLO PONTI -BRAUNSBERG -RASSAM PRODUCTION
3SH NO OWE POtR VAIITME MCOLOR A BRYANSTON PICTURES RELEASE
SHOWTIMES: MON.-THURS. 7:00-9:00

The
Loving Cup

FR. L &SAT. 7:00-9:00-11:00
PLANNING TREATMENT SUN. 5:00-7:00-9:00
Write:FIT FOU
HERBS FOR YOUTH 7 .61-9700HA
BOX 943, DANIA, FLA. 33004 AAR
CONTINUES ITS
PRE-SEASON CLEARANCE SALE
SPECIAL LOW PRICES ON
o WESTERN SHIRTS
i SHORT SLEEVE 3-BUTTOM SHIRTS
" BACKPACKING EQUIPMENT
. 'I ~rcr

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