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October 24, 1974 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-24

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Thursday, October 24, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

Thursday, October 24, 1974 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

COVER-UP TRIAL
Lawyer challenges Sirica

Strauss blasts
Ford for use of
Nixon-like' tactic

this is

ELECT

RAE WEAVER

on

(Continued from Page 1) a
THE SIRICA-WJ1SON argi-,
ment began with Wilson saying
Sirica was unfair.
The judge responded by an-
grily pointing his finger and
saying:
"Now listen, Mr. Wilson. You,
know me, you've known me for?
years. I'm as much interested
in getting the truth out as you4
are." ,
Wilson's questioning was di-;

r:' ted mainly at attacking the!
cre' ihility of Dean.
DURING A portion of Dean's
testimony, Sirica explained to
the j'iry that when a witness is
called by either prosecution or
defense, that side vouches that
what the witness says is believ-!
able.
When the jury was out of the
courtroom, prosecutor James
Neal said "we have concern"

Court rules drug
eVidence not needed

(Continued from Page 1)
Local reaction to the appeal
body's decision was generally
negative. Fifteenth Districi
Court Judge Sandorf Elden, who
in 1972 struck down Ann Arbor's
first $5 pot fine, said that he
would "probably not" convict
a defendant without physical
evidence - depending on how
stronga case was made by the
prosecution.
Elden did emphasize that,
"I'm bound to follow what the
law says, even if I don't al-
ways agree with it."
LOCAL attorney Donald Kos-
ter, who is currently running
against Elden for the judgeship
in November, said, "I would
certainly follow the law, but a
mere supposition that someone
was smoking marijuana, as op-

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posed to oregano, should not
sway any trier of fact."
State Representative Perry
Bullard, himself an admitted
pot smoker, expressed dismay
at the use of police informers
in the Upper Peninsula case
and the decision's impact on
informers.
"IT MAKES it a lot easier for
undercover agents to invade
people's privacy and arrest
them," he said.
Bus crash

about vouching for some of the
covernment's witnesses where
"we think 85 per cent of what he
says is true but have serious
concern about the other 15 per
cent."
Sirica said he wouldn't ex-
pect the government to vouch
for the credibility of witnesses
who have beenaconvicted, and
EEhrlichman's lawyer, WilliamI
Frates, said "I assume you ,
were thinking about former
President Nixon who may be,
called as a court witness."
SAID SIRICA: "That could
happen. I'm not saying it willj
happen. In that case, nobody
would have to vouch for his
credibility."
With the jury in the court-
room, Wilson led Dean through
his story of taking $4,850 for his
honeymoon from a $350,000 cash
fund kept by Haldeman in the
White House.
I Then Wilson turned his ques-
tions to Dean's testimony last
year to the Senate Watergate
committee about Nixon telling
him on Feb. 27, 1973, that he
should take over the Watergate
investigation.
DEAN ADMITTED that what
he had told the Senate com-
rmittee did not appear on a tape
or transcript of the meeting.
Dean said there was an over-
lap in his mind about meetings
held on Feb. 27, 28, March 1 and
March 13.
At that point Wilson attempted
to place the Senate transcript
into evidence and the judge
sent the jury from the room.
SIRICA TOLD the lawyers he
planned to let Wilson proceed
with Dean's questioning and
then let prosecutor Neal allow
Dean to make the same ex-
planation about the overlapping
meetings.
"I always want to be re-
spectful," said Wilson, "but I
think that's palpably unfair."
When Wilson continued to pro-,
test, Sirica said, "we're going
to do it may way, not your

(Continued from Page 1) j
"I call on Republicans in
Ohio and the rest of the country
to turnout to vote on Nov. 5 like
you never have before. Con-j
found doomsayers. Fool the
pessimistic pollsters."
WHITE HOUSE reportersj
were alerted just before Ford!
spoke in Oklahoma City to ex-
pect an important foreign poli-
cy statement.
Ford announced no new for-
eign policy move but, in what
Nessen said was a reference to:
congressional votes to soon cut
off U. S. aid to Turkey, the
President said:
"I am concerned about the
breach of this bipartisanship
between a Republican president
and a Democratic Congress..
"I AM concerned that if we:
get a Congress that is veto-
proof, a Congress that has the
wrong philosophy - both do-
mestically and internationally-
the possibility for the next two
years when our country faces
the challenges in the Middle
East, the challenges in the
Mediterranean, the challenges
in the Caribbean and in Latin
America, the challenges in the
Pacific - as we try to work to
broaden detente, as we try to
continue the normalization of
relations with the Peoples Re-
rniblic of China, as we, in the
White House, and those in the
Congress who understand bipar-
tisanshin and who believe that
partisanship should end at the
water's edge - if we get the
wrong kind of Congress, peace
could be in jeopardy."
T H E F O R D statement
prompted this response from
Democratic National Chairman
Robert Strauss:
"I was both saddened and
troubled at hearing President

Ford's shocking implication that
the election of Democrats would
have an adverse effect on'
world peace. This kind of rhe-
toric is reminiscent of the
Nixon - Agnew campaign of
1970, when they appealed to the
baser instincts of the American
public and were soundly reject-
ed."-
Sen. Edmund Muskie, (D-
Maine) called Ford's statement
"a ridiculous charge." Muskie
said the President apparently
was making a campaign pitch,j
but it came out as "a horror
story instead."
THE PRESIDENT tried to
raise red warning flags against
the election of "additional ex-
tremists in the Democratic par-
ty" to the Senate and House in
the Nov. S, balloting.
He argued that if the opposi-
tion party gains decisive con-
trol of Congress it will embark
on "wild spending programs."
there'
Classified

EFFECTIVE GOVERNMENT
It takes more than rhetoric and political rallies on the dikg
to make an effective State Representative. I will work for
effective change with other legislators, not against them.

kills

53rd Dist.

Paid Political Ad.
Douq. Crary/Treas.

Rep. St. Rep.

7 in

THESCEN
proudly presents from Detroit
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Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays
Throughout all October
Rock out from 9:00-2:00
Where it's only rock fn roll
but you'll like it ..-
(It's only $1 coyer too!)
THE SCENE 341 S. Main

The Adtnp G CsO

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Can anyone
do what
you do
any better?
You're pretty darn good at
your job. But today, we all have
to consider how we can do
our work a little better. That's
how each of us can help
keep our jobs here in America.
For now and for the future.
America. It only works
as well as we do.
lbN~aeCwibn~M p W ,i.S

'Georgia
(Continued from Page 1)
1S, one of the' youngsters on the
bus. He was not seriously hurt.
All but five of the injured-
four children and the bus driver
-were treated for cuts and3
bruises and released, said Don
Tate, administrator of the Rock-
mart- Aragon Hospital.
One of the children hospitaliz-
ed was in critical condition and
another in guarded condition.
OFFICIALS said there were,
79 children on the bus, which
had a seating capacity of 66.
Georgia law permits 20 per cent
overloading.
Tate earlier had reported
that about two dozen children
a were hurt, but he said the rest
were brought in later with min-
or injuries.
"These children had crawled
out from the windows of the bus
and went to a nearby store,
telephoned their parents and
went home," Tate said.
Southern Railway flew its
chief surgeon, Dr. Max Rodgers,
to the scene to assist local doc-
tors. The railroad also offered
to provide free of charge any
medical assistance needed.

wlay.:
II
*1
S
r.I

MENTAL HEALTH RESEARCH INSTITUTE
SEMINAR SERIES.
HENRY YAMAMURA
Department of Pharmacoloqyv Johns Hopkins
University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md.
Recent Research on the Muscarinic Cholinergic
Receptor in Mammalian Nervous System"
TODAY
EA: 3:15 p.m. 2059 MHRI
SEMINAR: 3:45 p.m. 1057 MHRI

"the earth is but one coun-
try and mankind its citizens"
--Boha 'u'lloh---
The Pittsfield
Township Baha'is
encourage you
to discover the
BAHA'I FAITH--
the dynamic, realistic source
of world unity today
SUNDAY, OCT. 27
2 p.m.-Village Green
East Clubhouse
4800 WASHTENAW

1:!

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I

WHAT'S A JEWISH
ARTS FESTIVAL?

Festival of Jewish Life-
Celebration Through the Arts

I'
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.
is
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i.

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U l all

- 6,pH W~E
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Itns.. F
Dance, Film

Drama, F
Music, Li
Oct. 28
Reserve

Sponsored by HIL

ine Arts
terature
-Nov. 5
Seats Only
LLEL 4
~ars
Audi M L5C

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MONDAY, OCT. 28-8 p.m.-ISRAELI FOLK FESTIVAL
at Power Center

ONLY

2

DAYS

LEFT

TUESDAY,
Hillel,
a well

OCT. 29-8 p.m. - RINA ROTHOLZ at
Free. A lecture demonstration. Ms. Rothols is
known Israeli artist.

Isn't the possibility of saving up to
$1000worth chcing out all of them?
All three of these luxurious and standard equ pment, begnning with
comfortable cars are pretty much last January 'sproduction. Yet the
the same size, inside and out. The Mark II is priced around $600*
major difference is in what you get less than the Volvo 144.
fo-r the money. Now~ take the Audi 100 LS
Take the 4-cylinder Volvo 144, 4 door Sedan. If you added the price
for instance. it comes with reclining of the thing that come standard
bucket seats, carpeting, electric on the Toyota Mark II but not'the
rear window defogger, tinted glass. Audi then the Audi would probably
whitewall radial tires, an electric be priced around $1000* more than
clock and a fold-down center armrest the Toyota M rk1. r
in the back seat. rokTifUyou re looking for
-So does the Mark II by Toyota. luxur'y and comffort in a small car,

WEDNESDAY, OCT. 30-8 p.m. - HEBREW CALIG-
RAPHY at Hillel, Free. Prof. Zamiska of U. of M.
School of Art, a workshop in the Jewish Scribal Art.
THURSDAY, OCT. 31-8 p.m.-AN EVENING OF JEW-
ISH DANCE at Hillel. An eveninq with Felix Fibich,
choreographer, dancer and developer of a unique form
of Jewish donce.
Student-$1.00, Non-student-$2.00
FRIDAY, NOV. 1-9 p.m.-POETRY OF ISRAELI WO-
MEN at Hillel, Free. Prof. Edna Coffin, a program on
the changinq themes in feminist poetry.
SATURDAY, NOV. 2-8 p.m. - YIDDISH & HEBREW
FILMS at Hillel. "Lauqhter Thru Tears," a Yiddish
film made in the 30's and "Margo," a first-rate
Israeli movie. Student-.75, Non-student-$1.50
SUNDAY, NOV. 3-8:30 p.m.-CONCERT OF JEWISH
CHORAL MUSIC at Hillel, Free. A program of Jewish
Liturgical Music conducted by Michael Isaacson, a
vounq Jewish composer.
2 p.M.-WORKSHOP IN CEREMONIAL ART
4:30 p.m.-WORKSHOP IN FOLK ROCK LITURGY

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