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October 24, 1974 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-24

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Tbursddy, Qctob r 24, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

%ge Five

Thursday, October 24, 1974 THE MiCHIGAN DAILY P~i§e Five

Bruckner, Mahler glow in
Gewandhaus' Hill concert

POETRY READINGS
Thurs., Oct. 24-730 p.m.
with
Sion Press, David Tucker, and Joe Salerno
reading from their works

By CHARLES SMITH
A Hill Auditorium audience
was treated to a veritable orgy
of German late-Romanticism
last night in a concert by the,
Gewandhaus Orchestra o f
Leipzig.
Although hampered in spots
by bad intonation and some
sloppy brass playing, the or-
chestra and conductor Karl Ma-
sur made a convincing case for,
a repertoire which a lesser or-
chestra could have utterly de-
stroyed.
The concert, presented by the
University Musical Society, fea-1
tured works by Mahler, Bruck- I
ner, and Reger, plus a Wagner
encore.
Ever since it was noticed by
someone that they both wrote
long symphonies, Bruckner and
Mahler have been associateda
with one another. In fact, how-
ever, they are only superficial-,
ly similar, and musically are
worlds apart.
Bruckner was influenced pri-
marily by the chromaticism of;
Wagner, while Mahler received
his most potent inspiration from
Brahms, especially the special
kind of Brahmsian chromati-
cism resulting from the novel;
Jones:

usage of traditional
vices.

tonal de-

Bruckner's pieces never seem
to reconcile the complexity of
the individual harmonies with
harmonic structure of the
whole, always sounding too long
for the amount of material they
contain. When the larger struc-
ture of the whole piece is re-
vealed, it turns out to be coher-
ently and simply organized, but
not enough happens over the
shorter time-spans to sustain in-
terest for that long a time.
Mahler also has the diffi-
culty of reconciling the large
with the small, but for the op-
posite reason. His music is
never uninteresting - there is
always a wealth of detail, strik-
ing orchestral textures, contra-
puntal lines suddenly revealed
to be crucial, etc. In his long
works, however, he often loses
control of the relationships of
all of this detail over the whole
piece - it becomes a string ofj
fascinating moments ratherk
than a coherently unified whole.
Mahler is at his best in short
pieces like the early Songs of a
Wayfarer. Here the conductor's
problem of projecting a coher-
ent structure while not obscur-I

ing the details by over-inter-
preting is minimized.
Masur controlled the orches-
tra well in this piece. Both the
players and the baritone, Sieg-
fried Lorenz, are to be con-
gratulated for subjugating their
personalities to the demands of
the music. A very fine perform-
ance.
Bruckner's Seventh Sympho-
ny, on the other hand, begs for
some sort of interpretation to
provide interesting ways of get-
ting from bar to bar, while not
obscuring the overall shape of
the piece. This piece received
the weakest performance of the
evening. Except in the slow
movement, which is the strong-
est movement musically, Masur
never found any way to make
the music compellingly interest-
ing.
The opening piece on the pro-
gram was the Reger Variations
and Fugue on a Theme of Moz-
art. What can you say about
Reger? People either adore him
or can't stand him.
I must confess to a sneaking
fondness for his music, while
recognizing that the man was
probably quite mad. The Ge-
wandhaus made the best case
I can imagine for a strange and
problematic piece of music.

GUILD HOUSE-802

Monroe

I -

Daily Photo by KEN FINK
Leipzig orchestra shiines
Conductor Karl Masur leads the Gewandhau s Orchestra of Leipzig during last night's con-
cert at Hill Auditorium. The performance featured German late-Romanticism, as exhibited in
Bruckner and Mahler.

Sweet country tunes

Shows Every Day at
1 -3-5-7-9 p.m.,
Open at 1 2:45 p.m.
it's the Some Guv-But
a Whole New Ball Game

By MARNIE HEYN and Bluegrass Festival last boutique) and organized a series religious preference) heard a
weekend. of special events to generate lot of wonderful music and had
Special To The Daily ! The Jones townspeople are funds, civic pride, and survival, a fine uncomplicated time there.
JONES, Michigan-This sleepy doing their darnedest to avoid Everybody will drink to that; In the American Legion and
town 10 miles west of Three backwater extinction and, worse, and, if the folkbluegrass extra- Community Hall with sample
Rivers, nestled in the heart of outside "development." United vaganza is any indication, Jones' bingo cards hanging from the
the southwestern part of the under the auspices of Jones Is prospects look very good. ceiling, a smokey fresnel spot-
state where everything closes Back, Inc., they have spruced Everybody in the audience light, and a very impressive
on Saturday night, sponsored !up the main drag (which looks (which spanned every conceiv- sound system. Amateur it may
The First Annual Jones Folk no kitschier than your average able hair length and shade of have been, but certainly not
sloppy; and the talent was
strictly top-drawer.
Ralph McGinnis and the
Sunnysiders from Detroit open-
ed up the festivities, pounding
out good-time hoedown music
and steaming up the unheated
hall in general. They were fol-
lowed by Stagmire and Sai-
mone, who hail from Grand
Rapids and played a lot of
blues (mostly misogynist) and
the nicest "Delia" I've heard
in a long time.
The Sweet Corn String Band
';from Kalamazoo came on like
this decade's answer to the
Kingston Trio, singing, plucking,
and strumming old favorites in
sweet harmony and with great
virtuosity. During the second
berjack and a hammered dulci-
mer and tickled the crowd with
P bG EL "Oh, Them Golden Slippers"
and "Marching to Boston."
The Tap City Revelers, out
of Ann Arbor and Elkhart, Id.,
N ;4.played elegant, intricate fiddle
band tues that set feet tapping.
Sour Mash ("Our name is really
e Raggedy Ass Rangers, but they
.won't let us use it.") featured
y x : IBobby Jones on banjo playing
country hits through the ages.
And the Pine Grove Ramblers,
ssto54by G ARYtEETwho ordinarily back up Nathan
P is hoato yGR L Abhsar, broadened the musical
Pato S eetC onl u n ig nestWtyhorizons with some fine Cajun
F c tdance tunes.
JOIN THE DAILY STAFF
A Reading by
EMERY
GEORGE HOMECOMING '74 ACTIVITIES
Mon., 28th, at 2 pI Thursday, Oct. 24
From his 2 new books L : Sponsored by Sigma Ch Pi a Phi
and from his unpub- PPR LY pnoe ySg aC i& P eaPi
lished works Starts at 8:30 p.m. at 548 S. State - There Will Be an
at Ethology Hanging Contest With a Trophy for he Winner!
Plus Noted Speakers.
Friday, Oct. 25
* THE OZONE PARADE: Starts at 300 pm.
* SOUTHER- HILLMAN -FURAY BAND & DAVID BROM-
BERG: 8:30, Hill Auditorium
Friday, Oct. 25 & Saturday, Oct. 26
" MEDIATRICS: "The Life and Times of Judge Roy Bean,
OUR PRICES Nat. Sci. Aud.; 7:30 & 9:30, Admission Free
ARE NOT
SALE PRICES, I Saturday, Oct. 26
THEY'RE * MUD BOWL: Sponsored by Sigma Alpha Epsilon at 1408
LOWER / Washtenaw; Begins at 10 a.m.
INCLUDING: I
I Stadium; Kickoff at 1 :30 p.m.
"The Whole j

IT"S
SURVIVAL
AND THE
FIENEST.

PARAMOUNT PICTURS PRESENTS
AN ALBERT &RUDDY PRODUCTION
BURT REYNOL q
"THE LONGEST YARD ' .
PRODuCEDBY ALBERTS.RUDDY
DEREC7EDBY ROBERT ALDRICH
SCREENPLAYBY TRACT K[NAN WYNN
STORY BY ALBERT S. RUDDYr£ ¢
MUSIC SCORED 8Y FRANK DI VOL pASCAEPOUE LNPHRWT
COLOR ByTECNNIJCOLOR y:fi4
A PARAMOUNT PICTURE '
kENDS TONITE I
251 so s a eMoms Mobley in
STARTS TOMORROW!
Ohen you can't
scream anymo6re!
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESFNTS~
y ;rAN l tO EDPRODUCTION TECHNICOLOR*
s a PARMOUNT PICTURE
PU
NIN
" GTonit & FrisaatA7 9 p.m.
I' tOpen a6:5 p.m.
Weekend Show t 1-3-5-7-9
Opena12:45
2nd Fabuos Week!
A 1934 CARTOON
CLASSIC! ,
MICKEY MOUSE
IN > s
"SHANGHAAI ED" -

From,"AN AMERICAN .RHAPSODY," (Gershwin)
Ballet weekend
An exciting weekend of ballet is in store for dance
lovers when the Pennsylvania Ballet once again comes
to Ann Arbor for three varied performances. This com-
pany of thirty dancers with its own orchestra, pre.-
sents favorite classics, along with new productions, in
the following combinations, all in the Power Center
for the Performing Arts:
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 26 AT 8:00
Serenode-Bnlaonchine/Tcho ikovsk
The. Moor's Pavone-Limon/Purcell
Grandie Pas Espapnole-Horkorvv/Moskowski
American Rhapsody-Rodham/Gershwin
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27 AT 3:00
Eight Movements in Rapped Time-Jone/Joplin
Serenade-Bol $nchine/Tcho ikovsk
Ame rican Rhapsody-Rodhom/Gershwin
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 27 AT 8:b0
Concerto Borocco-Balanchine/Bach
After Eden-Bu.tler/Hoibv
Zip Zoo--Lubovitch/Strovinsky
Eight Movements in Rapped Time-Jone/Joplin
Tickets are available from $4 to $8.50. A free lecture-
demonstration will be held Friday evening, October 26
at 8:00, also in the Power Center.
&MSICAL 8OCIET

Ii

Weekda

Burton Tower, Ann Arbor
4:30, Sat. 9-12 Phone 665-3717

lys 9-,

CINEMA
Ann Arbor Film

11 in assciation with
Cooperative presents

Ann Arbor Premiere
Bernadette LaFont * Jean-Pierre Leaud
Francoise Lebrun

"Jean Eustache shows the influences
not only of Bertolucci and Rohmer
but also of Godard and Warhol in
a work that is nevertheless very
much his own. There's a stark beauty
and honesty. His leading players are
impeccable in their revelation of
self!"
--JUDITH CRIST, New York Magazine
JEAN EUSTACHE'S
ANDT

{; , r ;: gff

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