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October 22, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-22

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Page Eig#it

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 22, 1974 1

Page Egtit THE MICHIGAN DAiLY
Tuesday, October 22. 1974 d

.-f

Charges fly in SGC voting

(Continued from Page 1)
election security loophole dis-
closed last week by The Daily
in validates the results.
Reith's other suit charges hisl
opponent, Bob Matthews, with
passing out "false and mislead-
ing" leaflets in the capaign.
Matthews admitted yesterday
that his leaflet suggests guilt by
association in tying Reith to
former SGC President Lee Gill,
who has since been the target of
a civil lawsuit and a criminal
investigation. Matthews. insisted
the rest of his leaflet was "open
to interpretation."
A fourth suit is being brought
by the Student Action Coalition
(SAC), which announced Friday
it would challenge the election
on the basis of the security
loophole reported last week.
THE LOOPHOLE lies in the
ease with which students could
remove marks made on their
ID cards by poll workers to in-
dicate a student had already
voted. Conceivably, many stu-
dents could have voted more
than once.-
The SAC suit also charges
that Council Elections Director
Alan Bercovitz' Wednesday an-
nouncement of a delayed voting
period must have discouraged
some students from voting. Ber-
covitz has since denied, ever
making the announcement.
With all votes counted yester-
day, Campus Coalition (CC) and
re-elected President CarlSand-
berg's Reform Party took the
biggest numbers of SGC seats;
Reform took 10 seats and CC
won seven. That left eight posi-
tions on Council to smaller par-
ties and independent candidates.
IF THE two major parties
form a coalition, it would be
impossible to prevent them
from controlling council. Pres-
ently Reform and CC appear
relatively close to each other
on the issues.
arated them, that of conetaoin
The major question which
separted them, that of continu-
ing the SGC legal advocate pro-

gram, has been retained by the j The council seat winners are:

voters who decided to retain it.
The first major test of the
new SGC will be deciding who
to seat in constituencies where
the voting ended in a tie. Ac-
cording to the constitution, when
voting ends in a tie, the Coun-
cil picks the winner.
THE SEATS for which there
are ties are Business Adminis-
tration, Education, M a r r i e d
Housing, Social Work, Public
H e a I t h, 'Pharmacy, (Nursing,
Medicine, Law, Library Science.
These seats are all a quarter
vote and were all tied by write-
in candidates.
Regardless of who won, it ap-
pears that they may not hold
their seats too long. Faye an-
nounced that dune to the pass-
age of the ballot proposal which
changes the number of council
members from 41 to 15, a new
election will have to be held in
December.

Literary College (LSA)-R3bin
Barclay, Elliot Chikofsky, and
James Stern; Undergraduates-
Susan Andrews, Darnell Jack-
son, Donald Daniels, Randy
Schafer, Todd Katz, and Gary
Baker; Professional Grod-Bob
Black, and H e t t y Waskin;
School of Natural Resources-
Karl Oz Chen; Dorms-Candice
Massey, and Robert Matthews;
Co-ops-John Petz; Frats-Jim
Dortwegt; Independent Housing
JSteve Thiry, Jim Glickman;
Music-write-in Lisbeth McCon-
nell; Sororities-write-in Cindy
Beaumont; Engineering - B o b
Matthews.
T~~RU THE

Mexico
balks on
oil sales
to U.S.
(Continued from Page 1)
no change in the attitude of
Cuba, we certainly have to
maintain our attitude ..."
" The UnitedtStates is drop-
ping its opposition to a pro-
posed United Nations charter
provision initiated by Eche-
verria on the economic rights
and duties of nations.
THE TWO presidents met
first in the border city of No-
gales, then helicoptered to the
mountain town of Magdalena de
Kino in Mexico before flying to
this desert resort south of Tuc-
son to conclude their talks and
hold the joint news conference.
The first, question was on the
recently discovered oil deposits
in southern Mexico and whe-
ther the two president had dis-
cussed American access to the
deposits.
"Si," Echeverria responded in
Spanish, adding through a trans-
lator that "Mexico sells to who-
ever wants to buy oil at the
market price in the wgrld mar-
ket."
HE DISCLOSED for the first
time that Mexican oil already
is flowing to the Latin Ameri-
can nations, Uruguay and Bra-
zil, as well as the United States
and Israel.
"We hope to continue to sell
without making any difference
among buyers in order to satis-
fy the demand," Echeverria
said as Ford sat silently at his
side.

F, d

Images arew hat It-'s all about.

\

i\sc
11 *v

Photographic equipment can
be a trap. Sometimes, you can get
so involved with it that you lose
sight of your real purpose-
making photographs.
The Canon F-1 can help you
forget about equipment and
concentrate on images. It was
designed, and functions, as an
extension of your photographic
vision. It's responsive in a way that
you must experience to appreciate.

And since it was conceived as a
system camera, every part works
together with effortless smooth-
ness, from the more than 40 Canon
FD and FL lenses to the over 200
accessories.
The heart of the camera is it's
central spot metering system.
With it you can use anyone's
exposure system, no matter how
critical, since it only measures the
central 12% of the finder area-

regardless of the focal length used.
So if you're spending too much
time lately worrying about your
equipment, it's time you stopped,
and took a good look at the Canon
F-1 system, and Canon's other
fine cameras-the automatic,
electronic EF, the full-feature FTb,
and the TLb. If you're interested
in images, Canon's your camera.

SHIRLEY BURGOYNE HAS CONCRETE, INNOVATIVE PLANS-.- -
rCampus Based Court for Students
. Night Court for Traffic Cases

Wanted
TEMPORARY
PARENTS
HOMES FOR
TEENAGERS
1 day to 2 weeks
ANY ADULT(S)
CONS IDERED
CALL
Ozone House
769-6540

x f "Totally Non-Political,
rf Equal-Opportunity Court
BURGOYNE for the 15th DISTRICT COURT (New Judgeship)
Paid Political Advertisement

Canon*
A System of Precision
Canon USA, Inc., 10 Nevada Drive, Lake Success, New York 11040
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MAHLER: Songs of a Wayfarer
Siegried Lorenz, baritone soloist
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