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October 22, 1974 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-22

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age Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 22, 1974

Pcige Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES FOR
WOMEN IN RETAILING
sponsored by

Boston battles over busing

A-% -- A WIL IM / 14 7--r'M'

E
1

CAREER

The first in a series of informal lunch hour discussions
with employers. Meet with representatives from J.C.
Penney, Montgomery Ward & Co., & Rikes. ALL WOMEN
welcome freshperson-seniors, grad students, faculty &
staff. Feel free.to bring your lunch.
Wednesday, Oct. 23-12 Noon
Held in Conference Rms. 4 & 5, Michigan League

(Continued from Page 1) I
atonomou s and fiercely proud.
If you ask Bostonians where
they're from, they're likely toI
name their neighborhood.-
South Boston, known as
"Southie," is close-knit and pre-
dominantly Irish. They say that
some Southies are born and diet
without ever going downtown.

decades ago, and few have been trimmed in mid-October. Ihe.
restored. Original shamrock em- streets are tree-lined and the
blems still adorn the signs over orange maple leaves are a
the storefronts. vivid contrast to the stark
Southies are angry with the streets of Soithie. In !Hvde
Boston Globe for its editorial Park, there are still a few ger-
backing of the busing plan. Cur- anins resisting the frost.
rently, people in South Boston
and Hyde Park are try-og to BUT WHILE the two areas
organize a boycott of the Globe. seem different, they are alike
"They're going to go out of enough when school lets -ut.
business if they're not careful," 'It's a strange sight to gee
predicts Steve Fitzgerald, a Ilgons of jack-booted, billy-club
thin youth who lives in Southi toting, riot police direcing
Boston and was assigned to at- school dismissal. Each mornmg
tend Roxbury High this fall. police search the pockets and
purses of entering students for
STEVE HASN'T been to school anything that could be consid-!
once. He's typical: only about ered a weapon.I
four per cent of the white stu- "They tried to take away my
dents have been attending class- nail file," says Alica Silverio inj
es at Roxbury High. a huffy tone. "So I didn't go to

Planning t
Placement
764-7460

I'

this is

ELECT

RAE WEAVER

on

WOMEN'S RIGHTS

Men perceive women and women perceive themselves. These
attitudes and percepions are not subject to legislation.
What is subject to legislation, is the availability of oppor-
tunity. Women must have the same opportunity in all areas as
men-education, private industry, government.-LIFE

SOUTHIE'S residents feel be-
trayed and besieged. They don't
trust politicians or reporters,
and they fear that the blacks
who are being bused to South
Boston High will take over their
school. In addition, they're very
much on the defensive about
where they live after getting
what they consider consistently
poor treatment in the press.
"First they (the black popu-
lation) want to take over our
schools, and then they'll want
to take over our neighborhood,"
claims Jim Shepens, a Southie
teenager. Stephens graduated
last year from South Boston
High. "Southie is a nice town,
with nice people, and everyone
is against 'us. They make it
sound like Southie is everything.
Southie's not everything."
His mother, expressing the
same view, is angry at the
court for ordering neighborhood
children to be bused to pre-
dominantly black Roxbury.
"OUR KIDS have gone to
school down the street ever
since I can remember, and now
they want to bus 'em to Rox-
bury?" she says. "I don't want
my kids to go there; it's dan-
gerous. All those colored people.
I'm not prejudiced or anything,
but I've lived with colored, I
know, I know."
A walk down Broadway Av-
enue, the main drag in Southie,
reveals the essential character
of the area. Bars like the Rab-
bit Inn are popular hangouts for
following the Red Sox and Cel-
tics, and tossing down brews.

|

he expects n ew
'e .epc s'in d ic tm e n t s
WASHINGTON (P) - Special Mitchell testified at the hear-
Watergate Prosecutor Leon ings of the nomination of Rich-
Jaworski indicated yesterday he ard Kleindienst to be attorney
expects more charges will be general. As a result of their
brought in cases still under in- testiiony at those hearings,
vestigation by his office. charges were brought against
In an interview, Jaworski de- h,)th Kleindienst and former
clined to discuss specific areas California Lt. Gov. Ed Rein-
where new charges might be ecke.
expected. Hedidsay that in- Kleindienst pleaded guilty to
vestigations of illegal campaign a misdemeanor charge of fail-
contributions and the ITT anti-' ing to testify fully. Reinecke
trust case are "not vet com- was convicted of one count of
pleted." perjury.
JAWORSKI was asked if he THE CH'RGES against both
would pursue an investigation' men were based on their testi-
against an individual who al- ; mony about ITT, which was the
ready had been convicted in an- ! main issue raised at the con-

53rd Dist.

Paid Political Ad.
Doug. Crory/Treas.

Rep. St. Rep.

But it's doubtful Steve Fitz-
gerald is missing much. "It
doesn't do any good to go to
school anyway," shrugs Leigh
Silverio, a junior at Hyde Park
High.
"Nobody learns anything. The
teachers aren't teaching any-
thing. They're just trying to
keep order." And according to
her sister Alica, "the teachers
are scared shitless," and many
are contemplating quittiag.
WHEN A CAR cruised through
Hyde Park Friday morning, a
middle-aged man leaned out
the window and inquired "need
extra guns?" Alica Silverio, who
was standing nearby, then yell-
ed back, "Yeah, I need one.1
Give me a gun.,
Hyde Park itself is very dif-'
ferent in appearance from South
Boston, although the two com-
munities share similar views on
the busing issue. Of the two,
Hyde Park is more prosperous.
It doesn't have the grimy run-
down look of Southie.
It's more a residential area,
for solidly middle class fami-I
lies. The two- and three-story
homes have small but neatly

school."
The first to leave South Bos-
ton schools are the white stu-
dents. Police direct them quick-
ly and qiuetly along the streets.
A few groups hang around,
smoking, talking, and passing
from hand to hand a copy of an
underground newspaper called
White Power, with two inch
headlines that read "Black Ter-
ror Spreads." A swastika rests
between the words White and
Power.
THE DOUBLE doors open
again, and this time black stu-
dents stream out to the waiting
buses. They board quickly, pro-
tected by a human wall of po-
lice, and the buses roll away.
Soon the remaining anlo:kers
drift away.
"It's not the blacks, it's the
trouble they cause," says Leigh
Silverio. "They don't wart to
come here either. If they were
a part of the community, it'd
be different."'
Her friend, Judy Griffin, a
senior wearing heavy make-up,
adds, "I'm totally against this.
It used to be like it was cur

other Watergate case.
"The fact that he is con-
victed in one Watergate case
does not mean he is not going
to be charged in another," the
prosecutor replied.
Jaworski refused to discuss a
specific possibility, the case of
former Atty. Gen. John Mitchell,
one of five defendants in the
Watergate cover-up trial.
IT IS understood that one of
the matters under investigation
by the prosecutor's ITT task
force is Mitchell's testimony
about the merger before the
Senate Judiciary Committee. I

firmation hearings.
Mitchell testified at those
hearings that he never dis-
cussed the ITT case with then-
President Nixon, a statement
later contradicted by the White
House. He also testified he was
unaware of an ITT pledge to
help underwrite the cost of the
1972 Republican National Con-
vention at the time antitrust
suits against the conglomerate
were settled. That contention
was contradicted by material
made public by the House
Judiciary Committee as part of
its impeachment evidence.

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Most of the stores were built I tended lawns, still clipped and school. We used to be aale to
p> oeoeon tm octoc:o<o<: go out on the front steps, sit
down and have a cigarette. Now
the door is guarded, it's like it
PGisn't ours anymore."
omorrow: Boston's black
neighborhood reacts to busing.
Is Giving Away a Free Greenhouse!! ---------.
vj 1st PRIZE: 4' x 6' Greenhouse; can be v difference!! *
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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Day Calendar I 2104 Archtecture, Urban Planning
Bldg., N. Campus. 4 pm.
Tuesday, October 22 English. Extension Service: Robt.
By1. poetry reading. Aud. 3, MLB,
WUOM: Dr. Isaac Astmov, "I, ,4:10 pm.
Thou, & The Computer," 'at Rint- Health Care Collective Meeting:
zlerville Inst. on Man & Science, Potluck dinner, 328 Catherine, 7
10 am. pm.
Music School: Trumpet Student Modern Dance Class: Trotter
Recital, Recital Hall, 12:30 pm. House, 7 pm.
Naval Arch., Marine Eng.: J. L. Computing Ctr. Seminar: Richard
Harton, Cleveland Cliffs Iron Co, L. Miller, "Taxir Information Re-
"An Overview of the Environmental }trieval System," Lec. Rm. 2; MLB,
Considerations in the Design and1 8 pm.
Operation of GreatLakes Ships," Higher Education Ctr.: Richard A.
311 W. Eng., 3:10 pm. Fulton, exec. dir., General Counsel
Nuclear Eng.: Saul Levine, Ras- for Assoc, of Independent Colleges
mussen Reactor Safety Study, "An & Schools. "Proprietary Schools in
Assesment of Accident Risks in Post-secondary Education," E. Leo.
U.S. Commercial Nuclear Power Rm., Rackham, 8 pm.
Plants (How Safe are Nuclear Re- Music School: String Dept. Pre-
actors?)" Chrysler Ctr. Aud., 3:30 sents, Recital Hall, 8 pm.
pm. Musical Society: The Gregg Smith
Great Lakes Research: Linda Gold, Singers. Powers, 8 pm.
"Physiological and Ultra-Structural PTP: Marcus' The Killng of Sister
Aspects of Phosphate Overcompen- George, Arena Thtr., Frieze, 8 pm.
sation in Plectomena Bosyanum," Career Planning & Placement
Baer Rm., Cooley Lab, 3:45 pm. 3200 SAB, 764-7456 Recruitiing on
Architecture: Wm. Mschenheim, campus:
slides/talk, "The Architecture of Mademoiselle's Coll. Bd. Guest
Greece, Israel, Russia, Romania," Editor Competition: Assignment I
due Nov. 1, 14 winners will spend-a
salaried month as Guest Editors,
LE OS WLL j for more details check DOB file at
a) bcHse ULT A 'CP&P.
gcrerous HOULTZ Urologic Physician's Asst. Prog-
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3CA 2.1- I % T write for info: Prof. Arthur T.
Evans, M.D., U. of Cin. Med Ctr, 234
-Pd. Poi. Adv. Goodman St. Cin., Oh 45229.
Psychology Concentrates
INTERESTED IN PSYCHOLOGY
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Applications may be picked up from:
DR. PEPSDORF
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Must be returned by October 31
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Every Wednesday-4:30-1 0 P.M.
Huron Hotel & Lounge
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