100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 17, 1974 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, October 17, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

Oakland

stings

Dodgers,

5-2

THE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Presents
A Weekend Retreat
TOPIC: "TOWARD A THEOLOGY
OF ECOLOGY"
This Weekend: October 18-20
on Lake Michigan

By The Associated Press
OAKLAND-Pinch-hitter Jim
Holt stroked a two-run single,
highlighting a four-run Oakland
rally that carried the A's to a
5-2 victory over the Los An-
geles Dodgers in last night's
fourth game of the World Series.
The triumph gave the A's a
3-1 edge in the best-of-seven
series. The American League
champions will try to nail down
their third straight world title
in Game 5, which starts at
8:30 p.m., EDT, tonight.
THE A'S WON with a typical
Oakland rally-four runs on just
two hits in the sixth inning. For
a change, they displayed some
long-ball punch but it came from
a most unlikely source-winning
pitcher Ken Holtzman.
He produced the game's first
score with a long home run over
the left-center field fence in the
third inning.
Los Angeles' only runs came
in the fourth when Garvey sin-
gled with one out and Ferguson
walked. After Holtzman struck
out Cey, Russell sent a screa-
mer up the right-center field
alley for two runs.
So the A's were on the short
end of a 2-1 score when they
came to bat against Andy Mes-
sersmith in the sixth inning.
North led off with a walk.
AS THE SPEEDY Oakland
runner took a lead off first,
Messersmith threw wildly past
first baseman Steve Garvey for

Daily
Sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL CRANE
an error, moving North to
second.
Sal Bando then snapped an
0-for-11 Series' slump with a
single to right and North scored
easily, tying the score at 2-2.
Next, Jackson walked and Joe
Rudi sacrificed the runners up
with a bunt.
The Dodgers walked Claudell
Washington intentionally to load
the bases.
THE A'S COUNTERED by
sending up Holt, a left-handed
batter, to hit for Ray Fosse and
the move paid off when Halt
lined a two-run single to right.
Bando scored easily and Jack-
son slid home under Yeager' s
tag after Ferguson's throw had
appeared to beat Jackson to the
plate.
Yeager argued bitterly with
home plate umpire Don Denkin-
ger's call. The television replay,
however, showed the catcher's
tag had been late on the sliding
Jackson.

moment later, Oakland got their
final run when Dick Green
f o r c e d "designated runner"
Washington at second base,
scoringrClaudell Washington
from third base.
Holtzman, enjoying the luxury
of a three-run lead, wiped out
the Dodgers in order in the
seventh inning. When he re-
tired the first two batters in
the eighth, it seemed he might
be headed for the first com-
plete game by an A's pitcher
in the World Series since they
were Connie Mack's Philadel-
phia Athletics in 1931.

Cost: $12

To sign up call 662-4466

ART POSTERS

BUT JIM WYNN walked and,
when Steve Garvey singled, A's
Manager Alvin Dark care to
the mound.
Dark waved relief ace Rollie
Fingers into the game to face
Joe Ferguson, whom he struck
out to end the threat.
In the ninth, Ron Cey opened
with a single, but Fingers
struck out Russell and then
second baseman Green made a
brilliant diving stop on pinch-
hitter Von Joshua and turned
it into a game-ending doble
play-his second in two nights.
The D o d g e r s repeaiedly!
threatened last night, jist as
they had in each of the games
the A's won in this Series.
Billboard
The deadline for entries for
All-Campus intramural water
polo is Friday, October 18 at
5:00 p.m. at the I.M. Bldg.
main office. For further in-
formation call -763-1313, or
stop by.
DOUBLEDOMED
HOUSTON (UPI) - When the
Louisiana Superdome is c o m -
pleted it will be large enough to
house the entire structure of
Houston's Astrodome.

Albers
Anuszkiewicz
Appel
Beardon
Bonnard
Braque
Calder
Chogall
DolIi
Dufy
Ernst
Frankenthaler
Giacometti
Indiana
Johns
Kandinsky
Klimt
Lichtenstein

Centicore Bookshops on May-
nerd Street has one of the
largest selections of original art
posters in the United States.
Our sources are in many parts
of the world, and we carry a
large number of posters that
are difficult to find anyplace in
this country.
These posters are created and
executed by the artists, them-
selves, tocommemorate exhibi-
tions of their works. Most of
them are original silk-screens
and lithographs; they are not
mere reproductions of paint-
ings. With the passage of time
their value can increase by the
same percentage as does the
value of other works by the
some artist.

Lindner
Louis
Matisse
Miro
Munch
Mondrian
O'Keefe
Oldenberg
Picasso
Pollock
Rockwell
Shohn
Steinberg
Stella
Trova
Vosorely
Warhol

CENTICORE BOOKSHOPS
336 MAYNARD

AP Photo
REGGIE JACKSON slides safely under Dodger catcher Steve Yeager's tag in the sixth in-
nning of last night's World Series game. Jack son and Sal Bando both scored on a pinch-sin-
gle by Jim Holt. Oakland won the game giving them a commanding 3-1 lead in the series.
The Dodgers now have their backs to the wall and must win the next three games.

Halt left for
Herb Washington,
the field to a huge
the sellout crowd

pinch-runner
trotting off
ovation from
of 49,347. A

BOHLIG, MAREK LEAD TROOPS

Badger

offense

threatens

By RICH LERNER es in nine attempts against
Good morning Michigan de- the once vaunted Missouri de-
fense, Your mission to accept fense, and hit on seven passes
this Saturday is to subvert the for 125 yards and a touch-
Wisconsin offense. down versus the Buckeyes.
These upstarts pose a threat He executed the option to per-
to the power establishment of fection, leading the Badgers
the Big Ten. to more than 300 yards in total
Employing an explosive air offense against Ohio State.
force, a swift cavalry and a ' Wisconsin possesses an exper-
punishing infantry, they con- ienced and highly capable re-
quered the forces of Missouri, ceviing corps. Senior flanker
Nebraska, and Purdue. Jeff Mack led the Badgers in
They have pledged that you pass receiving last year.
will be the next victim. Your mission Michigan de-
The mastermind of the fense is to contain Mack and the
Badger offensive operations other Wisconsin pass-catchers,
is quarterback Gregg Bohlig. tight end Jack Novack and split
Bohlig and his cohorts straf- end Art Sanger. Reserve flank-
the Nebraska and Missouri er Ron Pollard must also be in-
air defenses with bombs and activated. Pollard scored on a
an array of aerial missiles. 37 yard pass against Ohio State.
Bohlig completed nine pass- While concentrating on sty-

mying the Badger air attack,1
you must not forget to smother
the Wisconsin ground forces.i
Wisconsin coach John JardineI
has assembled a stable of fleet
,and powerful- running backs.I
Spearheading this divisiont
is junior tailback Billy Marek.
The squat Marek gained 1207
yards last year and has gal-g
loped for 326 yards and four1
touchdowns this season de-,
spite hobbling injuries.j
Fullback Ken Starch comple-
ments Marek well. The junior
blockbuster has averaged overi
six and one-half yards per car-a
ry thus far in the 1974 cam-
paign, mostly on inside runs.
The Badger running game
does not stop there. Marek's
and Starch's back-ups, sopho-
mores Selvie Washington and

Larry Canada are excellent run-
ners. Both have averaged bet-
ter than six yards per carry.
Washington, who moved from
flanker to tailback, has sprint-
er's speed and supplies Wis-
consin with a bona fide touch-
down threat on kick-off returns.
The secret to the Badger's
ground successes is monstrousa
tackle Dennis Lick. Lick de-
stroys his opponents and opens
holes wide enough to drive a
Jeep through.
WisconsiP continually runs
to the right side of the line toj
take advantage of Lick's licks.
"He holds his blocks long-
er than any lineman I've ever
been associated with in coach-
ing. He's a superstar in my
book." said Jardine.j
The rest of the Wisconsin line
is also formidable. Guard Terry
Strieve, perhaps inspired by
playing next to Lick, has pro-
vided excellent protection for
Bohlig. The other tackle, Bob
Johnson, started for the Bad-1
gers last season.
Completing the Badger line
are guard Mike Becker and cen-

ter Joe Norwick.
The Badgers have a pen-
chant for the big play. They
have scored six touchdowns
on plays exceeding 30 yards,
and three from over 70 yards.
The Wisconsin attack is basic-
ally one of inside runs, quick
pitches and play-action passes.
This attack has proved very ef-
fective, averaging over five
yards per scrimmage play.
The Badgers weakness which
must be exploited if you are to
accomplish your mission, is a
tendency to self-destruct.
They threw five interceptions
against Ohio State and suffered
greatly from penalties at inop-
portune occasions versus Colo-
rado. Wisconsin has fumbled
eleven times, losing six.
Your mission will be no easy
task. Stopping the Badgers will
take hard-hitting, penetration
by the line, good pursuit, and
tight pass defense. If you fail
to detain the Badgers your
perch as a power in the Big Ten
and in the nation will be high-
ly endangered.

RAVEL MICH. UNION 763-2
London at~ Christmas
Dec. 24, 1974-Jan. 6, 1975
Only 378.61
Flight on Scheduled
Airline Jets
for further details contact
~ TRAVEL
SIGN UP DEADLINE NOV. 20
International Student I.D.s Now Available

BROWSE THE

I

CHILDREN'S
BOOK, GAME
& TOY DEPT.

Soccer Club locates Toledo;
then pulls plug on Rockets

By TOM DURANCEAU
The Michigan Soccer Club
got lost trying to find Toledo
University yesterday . but the
Rockets probably wished the
Wolverines would have stayed
lost as the Big Blue beat TU,

off as Hikmet Siphi, affection-
ately known as "The Turk,"
booted the ball through the
legs of the sprawled Rocket
goalie for a 1-0 Michigan lead.
The goal came at 23:23 into
the first half.

Before the match the 'M'
booters were on their way to
Dayton before a friendly So-
hio Service station attendant
pointed them back toward a
smoke filled sky and grunted,
"There."

2-1. "The Turk" with amazing You can be sure the Soccer
Feeling each other olit early mid-field ball control lead the Club will find their way to the
in the match, the two teams Wolverine offense as they con- next game as they try to im-
wrestled with each other at mid- tinned to pressure the yellow prove on their 2-2 record.
field through the first twenty and blue clad Rockets. Again_-__ _ _
minutes of the 45-minute first the pressure paid off as winger
half, doing little but booting the David Gobel fired the ball'*past
ball back and forth. the Toledo goaltender from the
Midway in the first half how- short right side at 17:35 for a
ever the Michigan booters began 2-0 Wolverine lead.Pa r-i
putting pressure on the Toledo The TU Rockets came out
golie The Wolvrne us
goa ie. The Wlverines just zooming in the second half and PRESENTS
barely missed the goal wide sloppy defense gave the boys
and high on many occasions, from south of the border a*
and even hit the crossbar once. chance as Tam Taffese kicked C S H OL
Wolverine persistence paid the ball past the Wolverine
'goalie to cut the Michigan lead FOR
to 2-1 and the scoring was
CO R through for the day. Cr A MIA I

A career in law---
without law school.
What can you do with only a bachelor's degree?
Now there is a way to bridge the gap between an
underaraduate education and a challengina, respon-
sible career. The Lawyer's Assistant is able to do
work traditionally done by lawyers.
Three months of intensive training can give you
the skills-the courses are taught by lawyers. You
choose one of the six courses offered-choose the
city in which you want to work.
Since 1970, The Institute for Paraleaal Training
has placed more than 700 graduates in law firms,
banks, and corporations in over 60 cities.
If you are a student of high academic standing and
are interested in a career as a Lawyer's Assistant,
we'd like to meet vou.
Contact your placement office for an interview with
our representative.
We will visit your campus on
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 23
The Institute for
Paralegal Training
235 South 17th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103
(215) 732-6600

Ili..
N

NHL h:) iA SAi WL 1 LLZ "
New York Rangers 5, California 5 Detroi 4,Alat
Los Angeles 1, Toronto 1 CBnnW, u
vanove 1, Minesota I
wVFL G
Charlotte 27, Chicago 0
Shreveport 30, Philadelphia 25 -Pd. Pol. Adv
Held Over for the 11th Straight Week!
THE
RFD BOYS
FINEST IN BLUEGRASS MUSIC
at the
PrEi'ZEL BELL
THURSDAY-9:30
FRIDAY & SATURDAY-10:00

Fri., Sat., Sun.
Oct. 11-13
Thurs, Fri., Sat.
Oct. 17-19
Quirck Auditorium
487- 221

i

this is

ELECT

RAE WEAVER on
HONESTY AND ETHICS IN GOVERNMENT

I

On Sept. 19, 1974, Rep. Bullard had the chance to vote on ethics

0

I

11111

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan