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October 16, 1974 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-16

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Wednesday, October 16, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednsday Ocober16,1974THE ICHGAN AIL

Soviet
spy loses
to court
WASHINGTON (iP) - Convict-
ed spy-Igor Ivanov yesterday
lost his bid for Supreme Court
review of his conviction for
turning American military sec-
rets over to the Russians.
Ivanov had contended that the
conviction should be overturn-
ed on grounds that the govern-
ment used illegal wiretapvevi-
dence against him.
THE JUSTICE Department
had filed a brief with the Su-
preme Court saying it supported
a lower court decision uphold-
ing the wiretaps but urging
that the Supreme Court review
the case.
The Supreme Court, with Jus-
tices William Douglas, William
Brennan Jr. and Potter Stew-
art dissenting, declined to re-
view a ruling by the U. S. Cir-
cuit Court in Philadelphia that
the wiretaps were legal.
Attorney Edward Bennett
Williams, representing Ivanov,
told the Supreme Court that the
case raised the constitutional
issue of "whether warrantless
electronic surveillance is per-
missible in the foreign affairs
field."
IN 1972, the court struck down
the use of warrantless wiretaps
to gather intelligence for do-
mestic security purposes. I
In the same decision, how-
ever, the court said it was
withholding judgment on "the
view that warrantless surveil-
lance, though impermissible in
domestic security cases, may be
constitutional where foreign
powers are involved."
Ivanov was convicted 10 years
ago of attempting to communi-
cate to the Soviet government
information concerning the
Strategic Air Command.
HIS CASE has been to the
Supreme Court once before.
In 1969, the court sent it back
to a lower federal court for a
determination of whether there
had been illegal wiretaps.
The Justice Department dis-
closed the taps in the course of
the first appeal, but argued that
disclosure of the detailsto the
defense was not required.
IN ITS reply to the second
appeal, the department said it
supported the appeals court de-
cision upholding the wiretaps,
but believed the matter was
worthy and a final decision by
the Supreme Court.
Ivanov and John Butenko, an
American engineer with access
to Air Force plans for a Stra-
tegic Air Command electronic
system, were arrested at a rail-
road station in Englewood, N.J.,
after FBI agents saw Butenko
hand a briefcase to Ivanov.
Butenko received a 30-year
sentence. Three Soviet citizens
employed at the United Na-
tions were ordered home. Iva-
nov, a chauffeur for the Soviet
trading agency Amtorg when
arrested, is under a 20-year;
prison sentence.
Shortly after his conviction
in 1969, Ivanov was permitted
to return to the Soviet Union*
after his government promised
to send him back to the United
States if a court ordered it.

Have a flair for
artistic writing?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories a b au t the
drama, dance, 'film
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, c/o The
Michigan Daily.

UPHOLDS FORD VETO
House continues Turkish aid

h WASHINGTON (A) - The ride Ford's veto of the aid cut-!
House yesterday narrowly up- off.
held President Ford's veto of a But the opponents agreed withj
bill that would have cut off predictions of leaders, including
military aid to Turkey. Senate Republican Leader Hugh
The 223-135 vote, 16 short of Scott, that the Senate will sus-
thettwo-thirds majority requi ,tain Ford's veto whether the
w' ed to override a veto, killed the I House overrides or not.
cutoff measure and left Con- A presidential veto can be
gress the task of drafting new overturned only by a two-thirds
legislation to provide interim vote of both House and Senate.
""financing for federal agencies
t hhave not yet been voted CONGRESS has postponed its
their appropriations for the campaign recess for a week to
year. act because the Turkey aid cut-
THE VOTE was 223 to 135 to off is in an emergency stop-gap
- { over-ride, 17 short of the two- funding resolution for agencies
thirds necessary. whose legal spending authority
H o u s e Appropriations expired Sept. 3.
Chairman George Mahon (D- Denouncing "reckless acts,"}
Tex.) said the committee would Ford said in his veto message
meet later in the day to re- Monday that Congress' resolu-
draft a new emergency funding tion to cut off aid to Turkey is
resolution for a number of fed- "entirely destructive" to U. S.
eral agencies. The resolution efforts to bring about Cyprus
died with the veto because the peace negotiations.
Turkey aid cutoff was attached The President also said the
to it.
aid cutoff might imperil U. S.
The House vote was Congress' relations with Turkey "and
first on overriding any of Ford's weaken us in the crucial east-
vetoes and the House began re- ern Mediterranean. "It direct-
AP Photo cording it on the electronic vot- ly jeopardizes the NATO alli-
enChed ing counters on each end of the ance he added.
chamber almost immediately
looks to the outside. Born 25 years after Ford's veto message was BOTH THE House and Sen-'
bides his time in San Diego's zoo. read. There was no debate. ate originally voted overwhelm-'
OPPONENTS of the Turkish ingly, four to one, to cut off the
aid said optimistically Monday U. S. aid after Turkey's inva-
that spot checks indicated they sion of Cyprus to force nego-
r might be able to muster a two- tiations on Turkey's withdrawal
thirds House vote today to over- from the island.

But Ford contended that rath-
er than encourage negotiations
the Turkey aid cutoff would les-
sen U. S. influence in getting
Turkey to negotiate and "could
mean the indefinite postpone-
ment of meaningful negotia-
tions."
In a clear reference to con-
gressmen's sensitivity to Greek-!
American lobby efforts for the
Turkey aid cutoff, Ford said
lack of negotiations will not
help Greece or the Greek Cy-
priots. who formerly dominated
Cyprus.
''Reckless acts that prevent
progress toward a Cyprus set-
tlement harm Greece, for it is
the Greek government and the
Greek Cypriots who have the
most to gain from a compro-
mise settlement," Ford said.
-4

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LAST CLASS FOR TERM
BEGINS THIS
THURSDAY NIGHT
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mumm.~

R
Albert, a 400 lb. gorilla,
ago in the Congo, he now
Doctors

BECAUSE YOU'VE
ACHIEVED
The experiences that have "carved" your real, achievements
are the personal ones. Wear a class ring and remember.
Order on Ring Day and save 5%.
Thursday & Friday, Oct. 17 & 18-11-4
ULBICH'

GIVE BLOOD TO
KEEPA GOOD
THING GOING.

with memory drug
WASHINGTON iP) - Doctors are experimenting with a memo-
ry erasing drug that can rid a surgical patient of unpleasant re-
collections about the operating room.
nyCalled lorazepam, the drug still is experimental and available
only for medical research.
WHEN administered intravenously before surgery, a patient can
remain awake in the operating room under a local anesthetic and
not remember the experience.
"Anesthesiologists frequently are faced with a situation where
they prefer to have patients awake while anesthetized with a re-
gional block technique. However, the patient desires to have no
recall of the operating room or even leaving the hospital room,"
said Dr. David Heisterkamp of the University of Colorado medi-
cal center in Denver.
Heisterkamp and Dr. Peter Cohen, also of the University of
Colorado, reported yesterday on their research during a meeting
of the American Society of Anesthesiologists.j
THE DOCTORS said the drug is under consideration by the-
Food and Drug Administration. If it eventually becomes more!
widely available, Heisterkamp and Cohen said it might find
other applications in medicine where blocking recall of the trauma
connected with medical treatment would benefit a patient.
The drug has been available abroad under the trade name
Atiban for several years, the doctors said. It has been used largely
as a sedative.
The Colorado doctors have studied nearly 100 patients. Their
report yesterday was about results with the first 69.
PATIENTS WERE given the drug 45 minutes before surgery.
Thirty minutes later they were shown a double size picture of a
dollar bill and asked to describe it.
Then they underwent surgery in which they remained awake
under a local anesthetic. During surgery the patients were asked
if they recalled the dollar bill and again 24 hours later.
A group of control patients not given lorazepam also werej
shown the dollar bill and asked to recall it.
Those administered the drug at 5 miligram doses had no recall
at all. Most of those receiving 3 miligram doses also had no recall.
Control patients had perfect recall, the doctors said.

U. ofM.
SUMMER INTERN PROGRAM
in NEW YORK
Offering programs in Business, Adver-
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3 MASS ME ET ING
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towards liberal arts backgrounds
TICKETS GO ON SALE TODAY

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to buy gas.
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YPSILANTI, MICH.
Phone 487-9400
Mon., Tues., Thurs. 9.to 5 p.

m.J

.. ...

DIMENSIONS OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
LECTURE AND DISCUSSION SERIES
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 16, 3-5 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A
ZEN-THE CONFLUENCE OF TAOISM & BUDDHISM
by T. JAMES KODERA, Instructor in Religion & East Asian Studies, Oberlin College
NEXT WEEK: Oct. 23, 3-5 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. A
OCCULT METAPHYSICS IN THE WESTERN TRADITION
by Professor GARY KESSLER, philosophver of Religion
California State College at Bakersfield
Sponsored by Office of Ethics and Religion, 3rd floor, Michigan Union, 764-7442

-

JACOBSON'S OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY EVENINGS UNTIL 9:00 P.M.
SATURDAY UNTIL 5:30 P.M.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Volume LXXXV, No. 36
Wednesday, October 16, 1974
is edited and managed by students
at the University of Michigan. News
phone 764-0562. Second class postage
paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan 48106.
Published d ai11y Tuesday through
Sunday morning during the Univer-
sity year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann
Arbor, Michigan 48104. Subscription
rates: $10 by carrier (campus area);
$11 local mail (Michigan and Ohio);
$12 non-local mail (other states and
foreign).
Summer session published Tues-
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Subscription rates: $5.50 by carrier
(campus area); $6.00 iocal mail
(Michigan and Ohio); $6.50 non-
vURhL S W+L vT
R A co4
V ! \kOS Yeil + K'
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-Pd. Pol. Adv.

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