100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, October 1 5, 1974

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Five

Social

satire and

puns wit
By DAVID WARREN
George Carlin is one of the best comedians
in America today. His controversial material
combined with a relaxed style produce an in-
telligent comment on people, their relationships
with each other, and with the world. For better
than two hours Saturday night Carlin entertain-
ed an appreciative, but noisy crowd at Hill Aud-
itorium.
Carlin gave one of the most spontaneous, in-
sightful, and funny performances ever seen in
Ann Arbor. His brand of improvisational humor
has made him one of the most accomplished,
and popular comics around today.
His comedy ranged from parent-child relations
to some of the worst puns ever told. Carlin
shrugged off the groans that greeted his puns
with the statement that "people groan at puns
because they wish that they had thought of
them first."
Refering occasionally to notes, Carlin's reser-
voir of material seemed to be endless. Although
he stayed away from politics throughout the
show, he is essentially a social comedian, pre-
fering to deal with the comedy of everyday
life.

h

Carlin

He delved into the inadequacies of our lang~
unge, lamenting that there is no word to de-
scribe one who has lost the sense of smell.
"Yeah, he's blind, deaf, and he can't smell
nothing either."
Throughout the show Carlin appeared to be
totally involved in his job. Although Hill Audi-
torium is not what could be described as an~
intimate setting, Carlin was able to build up a
rapport with the audience. Frequently he would
start on one subject, work with it for a while,
and then go off on a tangent. His internal vision
of the world lends an almost expressionistic
flavor or to his act.
With Carlin was a new group, Travis Shook
and the Club Wow. They are two zanies from
Boston who sang some great songs, among them
"V.D. is for Everybody" and the theme from
Perry Mason. Their musical ability was lack-
ing, but their comedy was first rate. The duo's
first album will be released soon, called It's
Great To Be Back, and it should prove interest- D(
ing.
Backstage, after the show, Carlin was ex-
hausted, and regretted not being able to speak George (<a run
to the press. He did, however, give a pearl of Me(;ARRIGLE SISTERS AND BAIIAN:
wisdom, "Aluminum is jive metal."

aily Photo by KEN FINK

Beauty and the blues

By JOAN BORUS
One of the advantages of in-
terviewing musicians that play
at the Ark is the opportunity *
to be able to meet and talk with>
a variety of people who have
diverse backgrounds and exper-
iences. Lately, however, when
I began to look over my exper-
iences, it suddenly sruck mne
that I could count on one hand
the nunmber of women musicians
I had interviewed.
Consequently, it was a re-
freshing change to be able to
interview Kate and Ann Mc.-
Garrigle, along with Roma Bar-
an. Not only are the three ex-
dellent mnusicians and very arti-
culate about their art, but they
are also three very funny, de-
lightful people and to interview
them was genuinely fun.
All three hail from M o n.-
treal, although Roma was born
in Czechoslovakia. The M c -.
Garrigle sisters have been play-
ing and songwriting for several
years. Roma, who has played
b~ackup guitar for a numnber of
people, including Rosalie Sor-
rels, originally played with Kate

five years ago when both of and played it to this little New

them were in a blues group in
Mlontreal.
Both Kate and Anna were at-
tracted to blues music via their
exp.eriences in the group and
their exposure to old records.
The combination of the acous-
tic guitar and piano appealed to
them and it was this traditiocial
kind of blues material that was
featured in their repetoire wvnen
they first played at the ArK in
1969.
Eventually they wound up in
New York where one night they
heard Jack Elliott singing "Me
and Bobby McGee" at the Gas-
light.
"We thought it was an irtered-
ible sonig," said Roma. "We sat,
and by candlelight Kate wmuld
copy one line and then I would
copy the next line - we went
there every night. Anna, w fi o
knew shorthand, remembered
how the two called her in the
middle of the night.
"'It was really the first time
we thought about wvorking to-
gether," said Roma. "We wirk-
ed up this quick arrangement

York sharpy over the phone"
she went on, giving an imita-
tion of the character.
The "little New York sharpy"
liked what he heard and iney
made a studio tape for uecca
records for which they had to
come up with some material,
and from there, "the w h o 1 e
thing exploded," said Rorna.
Since then, they have turned
much of their attention to song-;
writing. Kate and Anna attrn-
bute many of their early gxper-
iences as being a formative in-
See McGARRIGLES, Page 8
514E William 1202 P
662-306 94

ackard

Now Has Two
Give You The
Prices

Daily Photo by- STEVE KAGAN
Roma Blaran, Kate and Anna Mc~arrigle (1. to r.)

tCondueter Kr
VIENNA, Austria (AP) - Josef Krips, one of
heworld's foremost conductors, died Saturday
night in Geneva, Switzerland, of lung cancer,
the Austrian news agency APA reported Sun-
day. He was 73.
Krips, born in Vienna, started his musical
career at the age of 19 as choir conductor of the
Vienna Volksoper and became Germany's
youngest general music director five years later
in the Karisruhe State Theater,.
From 1933 to 1938, Krips conducted the Vien-
na State Opera and lectured at the Vienna Con-
servatoire. During the Nazi occupation of Aus-
tria, 1938 to 1945, he was barred from perform-
Subscribe to The C
ECO-FLIGHT SYSTEMS,
2275 S. STATE
994-9020
HANG GLIDERS.e KlI
SUPPLIES . LESSON~
CHECK OUR PRICES
AND QUALITY WORK BEFORE BUY
I| '

ips dead at 73
ing in public, but immediately after World
War II he helped organize the Vienna State
Oper a.
In subsequent years, Krips led the Belgrade
Opera, the Vienna Hofkapelle, the London Sym-
phony Orchestra, the Buffalo Philharmonic Or-
chestra, the San Francisco Symphony and the
Vienna Symnphony. He made frequent guest ap-
pearances with many of the world's major opera
companies and orchestras.
His first wife Maria died in 1971, 3nd that
same year he married his former secretary, the
Baroness Henriette Prochazka, who survives
him.
~aiiy difference!!!
* PREPARE FOR:
- Over 35 year s
* IW~iMIof experience
NC* NAT an ucs
IN .Small ciase
LOIII Voluminous home
GRE study. materials
- Y 'O f Corses that are .
TS AT B constatlrueated-
S CArews of class
l1NG! FLEX maeal
-- Make ups for
:ECFMG mse esn
NAT'L MED DS
THOUSANDS HAVE S
* RAISED THEIR SCORES .
K0 0
LEDcATiONLcNE
* ,1Ic

it g it S7ki Ck6b
MEETING
W ED., OCT. 16-8 P.M.
F ACU LTY CL UB LOU NGE
(in the Union)
FURTHER INFO-665-7640

I

20% STUDENT DISCOUNT I

iivl

Jlnay -'
Warhols
?~rAnl&rnctoin

NGji Br92snMjU ~
METROP LIS (at 7)
The first--and best-science-fiction silent that concei'ns a revolution of the
subterranean workers against the capitalist rulers in a utopian city of the
future, This German expressionist classic has influenced everyone from
rmovie-writers to f-he Rolling Stones.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan