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October 13, 1974 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

d

-uC AAlr'u1C'AAI MAIL v _ .. _

Page Six

'T

I I: I VIUA1R/N DAtILY

Sunday, ctober I, it

I

ANO
j972

N1

LOOKING

I

THE WEEK IN REVIEW

tuition hike. In the meantime,
however, it must have been
comforting for students to know
the governor is on our side.
* * *

THE STREET FICTION PRESS ANTHOLOGY OF FICTIONS & POETRY
Edited by Warren Jay Hecht
Peter Anderson/Andrew G. Carrigan/Tom Clark/Andrei Codrescu
Glenn Davis/Ken Fifer/Jim Guthrie
Anselm Hollo/Bill Knott/Richard E. McMullen
Ron and Wayne Padgett/Bob Perelmen/Marge Piercy
Tom Rawortb/Steve Schwartz/Karen Snow/Tom Veitch
Arturo Vivant e/Jean Wilson/Martin Wolf/Ellen Zweig

Budget bugaboo
President Fleming called it
"the most dismal financial pic-1
ture we've faced in the last
decade," and no one - not the
governor, not the half dozen
University employes' unions,
certainly not the students -
was about to dispute him. In his
annual "State of the University"
speech Monday night, Fleming
warned that money troubles
might lead to another tuition
increase - a solution he said
was as distasteful to him as
anyone else.
But the strongest reaction to
the hint of higher tuition came
from Lansing, not Ann Arbor. In
a letter to Fleming, Governor
William Milliken predicted the
Univrsity's state outlay would
take a four per cent cut next
year, and all but ordered the

"Assume that tuition increas-
es and enrollment increases are
not viable alternatives," Milli-
ken wrote. "Present a budget
plan in conformance with this
directive which you will defend
to me, the legislature, and the
public."
OTHER STATE schools face a
similar budget cut next
year, according to the gover-
nor's ofice. The office said it
is awaiting word from Ann Ar-
bor on where expenses can be
reduced, and acknowledged the
no-fee-hike order is "not an ir-
revocable decision."
The University has not yet
revealed an overall budget stra-
tegy for 1975-76, and Fleming
said he would not rule out a

Available from your bookseller

president to find new sources of
revenue. ERIM battle

I

In the late 1960's war research
was a moral and economic is-
sue that drew the full furor of
the student movement. Locally,
thousands of students and fa-
culty members demonstrated
against the University's spon-
sorship of Willow Run Labora-
tories, where researchers on
Defense Department contracts
designed and tested laser-guid-
ed bombs, weapon- and troop-
detecting aerial sensors, a n d
other war material.
The protests had a part in the
University's 1973 disengagement
from the Willow Run labs. The
project got a new name -- En-
vironmental Research Institute
of Michigan (ERIM) - and os-
tensibly shifted its emphasis to
the state's ecological concerns.
But when ERIM, still taking
half its money from Defense,
prepared last week to seek an
Ann Arbor site, the old protest
ranks were not found wanting.
HASTILY organized Coali-
tion to Stop ERIM War Re-
T AIAN LQLE T
SS A
-TAURUS -
I E IL A 5O -","5, o1£R
F TZ6~kALO O5rSTMT3
j -Pd. Pol. Adv.

I

VOTE in SGC Elections
Oct. 15, 16, and 17
CANDIDATES ARE:

VOTE
NEO-MODERNAIRE
SGC ELECTIONS
OCT. 15-17

search Tuesday urged the 'Vain-
tenaw County Commissioners to
turn down a proposal to float
$3 million in low-interest bonds
to finance ERIM's move into
the city.
While ERIM President Wil-
liam Brown argued his labs are
concerned with improving t h e
state's research capacity and
would augment the county's
lagging economy with jobs and
commerce, the anti-ERIM ap-
peared ready to do battle. The
troops included radicals -- the
Human Rights Party and the
Indochina Peace Campaign -
as well as liberals; the Inter-
faith Council for Peace, and
Democratic County Commission-
ers Liz Taylor and Kathy Foj-
tik, who has spent weeks trying
to drum up opposition to the
ERIM move among other com-
missioners.
The best news for the opposi-
tion came in Friday morning's
report that approval by the
county board - expected at
the end of the month - would
face a full ballot referendum
if organizers can collect the sig-
natures of five per cent of
Washtenaw voters in 45 days.
Also, school board officials
pointed out that ERIM's t a x-
exempt status could lose t h e
school system up to $90,000 in
property tax. And in the year
of stagflation, that was not .he
only reason voters might prefer
to vote "no" on a bonding pro-
posal.
Moreover, to most members of
the anti-ERIM coalition, peti-
tion drives are like batting
practice.
Cops and robbers
Pow! Zap! KaBoom! A gang
of scheming bandits kidnapped
SHOP
AT
FOLLETT'S
For Textbooks, Trade books
& Paperbacks
"A FULL SERVICE
BOOKSTORE"

BACK
an Ypsilhnti bank president and
his family, held them all of
Wednesday night, then forced
Richard Green to rob his own
bank of $35,000 before releas-
ing the unharmed hostages and
splitting the loot. Local, state,
and federal- law enforcement
agencies, faced with the strang-
est local heist in recent mem-
ory, tried to chase the crooks
and wound up chasing e a c h
other - verbally and physical-
ly.
STATE POLICE and FBI ap-'
7'- parently learned of t h e
kidnapping by early Thursday
morning, but at that point -
a good ten hours into the crime
- the Washtenaw County sher-
iff's department was still in the
dark. One deputy flagged down
a suspicious car in a high-
speed chase through the streets
of Ypsi, only to find the car
contained FBI agents who were
pursuing the real badmen. With
that, Sheriff Fred Postill hit
the ceiling.
"I think the state police
aren't telling us anything be-
cause they want to catch the
suspects themselves," he roar-
ed after it became clear Thurs-
day that the bandits were bet-
ter coordinated than the cop-
pers. "Most of what I know
about the investigation, I read
in the Ypsi Press."
Laurels to the press corps
not withstanding, Postill is send-
ing a protest letter to state po-
lice headquarters in Lansing.
State troopers say they got
direct FBI orders to keep the
kidnapping quiet in its e a r ly
hours. The FBI denied any
blackoit had been ordered.
Postill raged on, claiming the
state officers bungled a bank
heist tipoff last summer by try-
ing to singlehandedly cover all
of Ypsi's banks. "As it 11appen-
ed," the sheriff said, "t h e
thieves held up another bank
than the ones being staked out."
Postill said his officers will now
ignore freeway accident reports
and leave them to state jurisdic-
tion - a pronouncement t h a t
smacked of revenge.
Meanwhile, somewhere, some-
body was $35,000 richer.
-Dan Biddle

y

SEAT
SGC PRES. & V.P.

CANDIDATE
CARL H. SANDBERG
REDDIX D. ALLEN
STEVEN LATOURETTE
TERRENCE W. BUNGE
CAROL GRACE PAPWORTH
JOEL RICHARD STELT
DAVID J. MIKKOLA
G. J. DiGUISEPPE

PARTY
R.
S.A.C.
N-M
C.W.P.

RESIDENTIAL CONSTITUENCY

DORMS
CO-OPS
FRATERNITIES
INDEPENDENT
HOUSING

CANDICE MASSEY
ROBERT E. GORDON
SUSANNE DIAMOND
JOHN PETZ
WILLIAM NEALON
JAMES EDWARD DORTWEGT
JOHN KRISEL
PAUL JAKARY
TIMOTHY N. JAY
JIM GLICKMAN
CALVIN LUKER
BART MOORSTEIN
STEVEN J. THIRY
ESMERALDA WATKINS
MICHAEL SMITH
HUGO J. MACK
THOMAS BURNS
RICHARD C. GRIMES
JOSEPH GORING
GUY CAVALLO

R.
C.C.
R.P.
CC.
S.A.C.
S.A.C.
R.
R.
R.
R.
C.C.
C.C.
C.C.

DIVISIONAL CONSTITUENCY

UNDERGRADUATE
PROFESSIONAL
GRAD

JEFFREY J. THOMPSON
ALAN D. HUNT
SUSAN D. ANDREWS
JAMES EAGLETON
TODD M. KATZ
DONALD DANIELS
DARNELL D. JACKSON
WALT W. BORLAND
GARY BAKER
RANDY SCHAFER
DAN BERLAND
DON R. KAN.IA
IRVING FREEMAN
BOB BLACK
HETTY WASKIN

G.W.P.
R.
R.
R.
C.C.
C.C.
C.C.
C.C.
C.C.

ROYAL SCOT
4 Pound Hamburger
with Cheese,
French Fries, Large Coke

transcendental meditation
as taught by
MAHARISHI
MAHESH YOGI
"Provides deep rest
as a preparation for
Synamic actiiy
TUES., OCT. 15 TNT ..
Michigan League
C 3rd floor, Room D
for additional information call 7618255

R.

SCHOOL AND COLLEGE CONSTITUENCY

All for'
only,

Regular
$1.30

ENGINEERING
SCHOOL OF N.R.
LSA

DOUG REITH
ROBERT MATTHEWS
KARL OZ CHEN
JAMES STERN
DOUGLAS BRYAN HAM
WILLIAM FRANKLIN LONG
ROBIN BARCLAY
ELLIOT CHIKOFSKY
RAY O'HARA
JEAN A. NUECHTERLEIN

R.
C.C.
R.
R.P.
G.W.P.
R.
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C.C.
C.C.

All Day Sunday at 3352 Washtenaw

KEY TO PARTY AFFILIATION:

R.
S.A.C.
N-M

REFORM
STUDENT ACTION COALITION
NEO-MODERNAI RES

G.W.P.
C.C.
R.P.

GUESS WHO PARTY
CAMPUS COALITION
RO-CHDALE PARTY

HAIL TO
THE VICTORS!
Now for the first time an in-
depth look at the black athlete
in b i q - t i m e intercollegiate
sports. The super performers at
one university-The University
of Michigon-tell in their own
words what it was like to be a
star--and black-in the days
before Civil Rights legislation.
140 PAGES
17 PAGES OF PHOTOS
6" x 9" softback
$4.95

I

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SOMETHING NEW IS HAPPENING'
AT THE
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LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ALL DRINKS % PRICE
THE EASY ROCK SOUNDS OF * ALL NITE
WYNN & TOM (DINING ROOM CLOSED MONDAY)
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AVAILABLE AT LOCAL BOOKSTORES
THE ISRAEU POH PESTIVAt '74
THE ISRAELI POH PESTIVAt '7
THE ISRAEUI PO K PESTIVAL '74
STARRtNG:
Yalta irkons
FEATURING
The Adier T1io Gadi Elon The Sabrai
DATE: Monday, October 28, 1974
TIME: 8:00 P.M.
PLACE: The Power Center for the
Performing Arts

I

]t

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