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October 13, 1974 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-13

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Page Four

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, October 13, 1974

BOO

KS

ROMANTIC TRIANGLE
Murdoch's gothic novel of the
evil forces in possessive love

STREET FICTION PRESS
A local little magazine of some
repute becomes a book, ANON

THE SACRED AND PRO-
FANE LOVE MACHINE, by
Iris Murdoch. New York:
Viking Press, 374 pp., $8.95
By MARTY HAIR
T FIRST, the situation seems
innocent enough. Here is
the familiar love triangle, the
story of husband, wife and mis-
tress and the personal hells
evoked by their intertwined re-
lationships. It might have con-
tinued innocent; but in the
hands of British novelist Iris
Murdoch, the situation takes a
turn for the surreal and de-
monic. Once The Sacred and
Profane Love Machine shifts
UA W WLL
ecasear AY
AWILSSA ! tteQ A G Ok.
QUAR~IAN IG Tt
AS' PAUL !Q COMMi5OrtfP
-Pd. Pol. Adv.

into gear, the book's characters
are torn apart by their own
perversities.
The story begins at Hood
House where hack psychothera-
pist Blaise Gavender lives with
his wife, Harriet, and their
teenage son, David. It is an
average, quiet, bourgeois house-
- hold. However, author Murdoch
soon reveals that the Hood
House calm is deceptive. Blaise
is suffering from guilt, stem-
e ming from his dual life of the
past nine years. While dull un-
ademanding Harriet has been en-

sees Luca standing in her gar-
den, a nightmarish sign of
Blaise's other life.
Luca isn't the only dream-
ghost in the novel. Murdochr
gives us Sophie, the dead wife
of Gavender's next-door neigh-
bor, Montague Small, still;
hauntingly present in her hus-
band's mind. Monty Small, the
demon of the novel, is a writer
of detective thrillers, and the,
hero of his writing, Milo Fame, one - even the readers. Monty
is Small's alter-ego. Fane is is mysteriously bewitching,
characterized as "a remorse- making characters easy prey
less killer who never smiles." for the love machine's destruc-

4
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It
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ANON 1974; edited by War-
ren Jay Hecht. Ann Arbor:
Street Fiction Press; 94
pages, $3.
By DON KUBIT
I OR THE last seven years
ANON, an anthology of fic-
tion and poetry, has been an
outlet for local writers. Sup-
ported by local businesses and
friends, the editor, Warren Jay
Hecht, somehow managed to
scrape together the necessary1
resources each year in the typi-
cal "little magazine" tradition.
Sold on the Diag and in local
bookstores, ANON attracted
enough attention to subsist. It
may now be ready to thrive.

finger in this socket and
then stepping into this tub
of water
But that's the easy way
out
The hard way is to go on
plowing through the happi-
ness
The goddam no money en-
ergy crisis deformed child
happiness
Hecht believes "Japan" may
be one of the most important
poems Clark has written and
compares it to his earlier,
widely - acclaimed, work in
"Stones".
j AGREE WITH his appraisal
and would only add that it
was an excellent choice with

THE LATTER alone is worth
the price of ANON 1974.
Since ANON 1974 is an an-
thology it offers a variety of
writers and styles. It can be
read as a unit or left on the
coffeetable to be tasted at one's
leisure.
The misconception that ANON
was in some way connected
with the University should be
dispelled. This is not an aca-
demic anthology of struggling
young writers trying to per-
fect their art, but a collection
of professional writing, edited
and produced by professionals.

d
:s
-
is

00
There IS a df
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I PREPARE FOR:
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: MCAT oferxperience
* AT and success
Small classes
LSAT Voluminous home
GRE study materials
ATGSB Courssta't :
* 111110 constantly updated*
" IcATP Tape facilities for :
*" reviews of class *
0 f f7 lessons and foruse 0
*" Dn of supplementary *
FLEX materialsfo
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SAT'. MED OS
THOUSANDS HAVE s
* RAISED THEIR SCORESwi a
*te (or call:oS
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EDUCATIONAL CENTER**
T TEST EPAAO s s
SO-01CIALISTS SINCE 138
Banches in Major U S Cities

joying their perkect" mar- HARRIET ADMITS that "love
riage, Blaise has been keeping (is) itself the madness,"
his mistress, Emily McHugh, troubling everyone and leading
and their eight-year-old son, them to commit strange crimes
Luca, in a London flat. Harriet against each other. Blaise, the
is too trusting; her opposite, "clumsy, greedy egoist," is en-
Emily, is an emotional vol-c d byMonty to form
cano. She makes Blaise's life IHarriet about Emily and to pray
unpredictable and exciting. She for his wife's forgiveness. He
is his "dark goddess." somehow yearns to be able to
Deciding the deception must I carry on both parts of his life.
end, Blaise tells Harriet about Blaise reasons that Harriet will
his other life. The barrier be- not reject him. "If he hurt his
tween the two worlds is first finger she sympathized, so why
broken by Luca, an intense and not now?" Harriet responds by
withdrawn boy, resented by his revealing her feelings to Emily
mother as "a ceaseless dark and Luca. She not only wants
mysterious pain." One suffo- to meet them; she wants to
cating summer night, Harriet possess them, to swallow their
lives. Blaise "had hoped per-
haps for an angel's kindness,
but he had not anticipated an
angel's power." He is as trap-
ped now as he was before. Em-
A ily, who had badgered Blaise
to leave Harriet, now wants re-
HALLOW EEN venge and justice for the emo-
tional wrongs she has suffered
PARTY for nine years.
! Monty himself is the concert-
AT master of the macabre situa-
tion. He is the villanous devil's
"" -- +--- advocate, convincing each char-
acter to hurt the others. His
powers thrive oncethewins
trust, and he has it from every-

tion.
SHE TERROR EVOLVES
from love turning good into
bad, innocent into wicked. Da-
vid, for example, had been a
child on the verge of aware-
ness, "a creature in metamor-
phosis trailing a half-discarded
form," before knowledge of
Blaise's double life. "I am
only a child," he wails. "How
can they do this to me?"
Luca, with his sardonic smile,
watches over the action and dis-
integration around him. He is
open only with Harriet, who
tries to steal him from Emily.
The Sacred and Profane Love'
Machine takes readers to an
edge of reality where wicked-
ness threatens to overwhelm
them. Murdoch suggests that
the worst, which is about to
! happen, inevitably will. Particu-
larly in the surprise ending, the
story is told with a sense of glee
and quiet violence; and in the
rest of the novel, the lives of
Harriet and Emily with Blaise,
and Monty's revelations, are
juxtaposed for maximum im-
pact. As the lives of these weird
characters unfold, Murdoch dis-
plays her fluid, poetic and vivid
Estyle.
With its full images and un-
predictable plot, The Sacred
and Profane Love Machine en-
joyably picks up where normal
love tales leave off - as the
emotional destruction begins.
Love is suffocating and unmer-
ciful, Murdoch says; but it is
life. Still, there is the sense
that while the book's demons
lower their masks, Murdoch is
cackling as we recognize our-
selves.

ANON 1974 is published by which to begin Anon 1974.
Street Fiction Press, a local Among the other poetry con-
publishing company comprised tributors are Marge Piercy, An-
of artists and, writers whose drew Carrigan, and Richard
professionalism is best exempli- E. McMullen, whose "Chicken
fied in "Periodical Lunch." Beacon" is a fable reminiscent
Consequently, ANON 1974 has of Aesop.
the charisma of other Street
Fiction Press publications - it Two of my favorites in this
is a professional product. And collection are by local writers:
since Street Fiction Press now "The Girl Can't Help It", a
has national distribution, the poem about Jayne Mansfield
ambiguous (often demeaning) and the 50's by Hopwood win-
tag "little magazine" can be ner Steve Schwartz, and a ser-
dropped. ANON 1974 is a book. ies of prose poems by Ellen
Zweig entitled "The Dwelling

ANON 1974 WILL be available
beginning Tuesday, October
15. Support it. Enjoy it.
Don Kukt is a free-lance
writer liring nii Ann Arbor.

114 E. WASHINGTON
Downtown Location
Thurs., Oct. 31
WEAR A COSTUME
There will be
PRIZES & DANCING

i

BROWSE THE
CHI LDREN'S
BOOK, GAME
& TOY DEPT.
on
FOLLETT'S
SECOND FLOOR
State Street End of Dias

("ONTRIBUTORS i n c I u d e
both local and nationally-
known writers. Together their
works form a literary antholo-'
gy of diversity and finesse.
The first selection in ANON
1974 is "Japan", a long poem by:
Tom Clark, poetry editor of the
Paris Review and a University
alumnus.
"Japan" is a metaphysical
poem and in it Clark deals with
the contradictions and complexi-
ties of life:
I keep getting the feeling
Only a man who lives in the
present is happy
For in life in the present
there is no death
There is only a pulled groin
muscle
An electric heater
A radio ad for pool table
sale priced at $18.88
A BSORBED in thoughts of
death, there is the psycho-
logical analysis of emotions:
I can make myself indepen-
dent of fate by putting my
pro~t41'd ZA1OULTZ
P iL LsL
CANCER PCt1~e~tc K1
THO {S Solc, o VS (otCVMMLSkOIR
Pod. uPCI. Ad
-d. Pol. Adv.

Poems", about homes and
childhood memories:
"WHEN I AM chased in my
dreams by a highly or-
ganized conspiracy, it is to the
backyards of my childhood that
I run for safety."
There is a wide range of fic-
tion here from the experiment-
al styles of Tom Raworth,
"There Are Few People Who'
Put Qn Any Clothes (Starring
'It')" and Peter Anderson's'
"The Call" to the book's final
selection "The Parish Priest"
by Arturo Vivante.
Readers may recall Vivante
from his pieces in New Yorker
and "The Parish Priest" has
the same sort of controlled
style Vivante is known for.
]MARGE PIERCY contributes,
a story about a Christian
with a Harley - Davidson who
has a transfusion in "God's
Blood."
My favorites of the fiction
selections are "Religious Vi-
sions Produced by Dangerous
Brain" by Tom Veitch - a
hitchhiker's tale expertly in-
tertwined with historical events
of the day; and "An American

my mind is not with people
sealed tight in heated houses
it longs for winter to come
and cover the earth with snow
to see tree limbs bare and black
outlined against a grey sky.
tall and proud they challenge it
come, let loose your storms
try to bury us in snow, break us in two
with cold
but when spring comes we will be here still
ready to watch the snow around us melt
to feel the earth at our roots unthaw.
i also wont to prove my strength, to cry
i have survived your freezing inhuman cold
(even gloried in it)
enjoyed your many feet of snow
seen the beauty of your northern lights
watched the days slowly die
then be born again.
-Joanne Smith

Mtart), hir is Aa raa'uale stu-
dient in Jou rnali.sm-n

,al
Ci

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SGC ELECTION - 15, 16, 17 OCTOBER

REFORM1Platform
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL, the central student government at UM, can be on ef-
fective tool for action on student concerns and matters of importance to the community.
Before Carl Sandberg and Reddix Alien took office as President and Executive Vice-President
last January, SGC was plagued by financial irresponsibility, racism, mismanagement, and in-
activity on issues of true concern to the students on campus. Since January the internal opera-
tina structure of SGC has been totally revised, several legal cases have been initiated to re-
cover student monies allegedly misused by former officers, a financial accountability system
has been implemented, operating costs have been reduced, action has been taken on student
organizations issues (especially defeating the Administration proposal for direct Univer-
sity control of student organization finances), and SGC's ability to act effectively on matters
of student concern has been restored. Under the Sandberg-Allen leadershp, SGC is now
ready to tackle maior issues on the student body's behalf.
The REFORM slate headed by the Sandberg-Allen ticket, will support or initiate
action in the following areas:
SGC FINANCES -
* Honest and efficient management of student gcvernment finances and frequent financial
reports to the student body.
# Continued legal action for recovery of student funds allegedly misused by former SGC officers
BLACK CONCERNS -
0 12 percent Black admission and maintenance of this level of enrollment.
" Increased hiring of Black employees by the University.
" Elimination of clauses on the financial aid affidavit which we believe are in violation of the
aid recipient's constitutional rights.
WOMEN'S CONCERNS -
r Continuation and expansion of women's programs on campus, including additional funding
for the Women's Advocate, establishment of University-funded Child Care Centers, and in-
creased Women's Studies programs.
STUDENT'S OWN FINANCES -
* Student government action on financial issues affecting a student's own wallet. Work to-
ward the establishment of programs such as (a) Yale University-style deferred tuition plan,
(b) tax deduction of college expenses, (c) bicycle and liability insurance, (d) better apartment
insurance, (e) clarification of Health Service billing procedures, and (f) changing dorm meal
contract system to give residents the right NOT to eat in dorm cafeterias.
p Opposition to further dorm rate increases and recent cutbacks in quality and quantity of
dorm services; Initiation of a comprehensive investigation of massive waste of Housing funds
(such as spending $240,000 on converting two dorm cafeterias from a working meal-line sys-
tem to a questionable one which eliminates student jobs).
* Work toward the establishment of an SGC-sponsored STUDENT TEXTBOOK LOAN AND
GRANT SCHOLARSHIP FUND, which could be funded by concerts of popular performers
(also providing students with campus-wide weekend activities).
* Petitioning the State Legislature to increase appropriations to UM in order to prevent
further tuition increases.
ECOLOGICAL ADVOCACY -
* Environmental alternatives programs; informing the Midwestern colleges of corrective meas-
ures and promoting conservation principles within the University's jurisdiction.
UNIVERSITY RELATIONS -
A For the Office of Student Services, work to establish an Asian-Advocate Office, increase the
funding of the Minority Advocates well past their recently cut budget levels, make Student
Services more responsive to the needs and problems of students, and stop actions taken by
that office against the autonomy of student organizations.
* Support the election of a Student Regent, and the seating of the SGC President, ex officio,
at all open and closed Regents sessions.
* Careful study of the Regents Commission to Study Student Governance report and other
proposals for restructuring central student government, and opposition to administration
interference with student government.
* Active support for the Graduate Employees Organization (GEO) in their current negolations
with the University, WITHOUT AN INCREASE IN TUITION.
PROGRAMS FOR SGC -
0 We oppose the ballot question to eliminate the Legal Advocate Program from SGC. Legal
services available to sudents should be increased-not decreased l
® Publication of a comprehensive course and faculty evaluation booklet written by students
for students.
* Establishment of a non-partisan student electoral commission for all student elections.
AND, ABOVE ALL, communication with the student body to enable the central student govern-
men to act rapidly and effectively on matters of student concern as they arise throughout the
school year.
REFORM slate for STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL

ISc WILL RPfECT
~beoe ey e HOULTZ
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