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October 12, 1974 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-12

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 12,'1974

Page EIght THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, October 12, 197:4

Citurct ik4r4h)i, eOice _

Entertainment':
Dance with MGM

CANTERBURY HOUSE
218 N. Division-665-0606
Holy Eucharist at noon at
Canterbury House. A meal fol-
lowing.
* * *
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH, 1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Robert E. Sanders,
John R. Waser, Brewster H.
Gere, Jr.
"Where Christ, Campus and
Community meet"
Worship Services at 9:30 and
11:00 a.m. -S e r m o n Title:
"In Debt But Not Bankrupt."
UNIVERSITY REFORMED
CHURCH, 1001 E. Huron
Calvin Malefyt, Alan Rice,
Ministers
9:30 a.m.-Church School.
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship.
5:30 p.m.-Student Supper.

ST. MARY STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-05$7
Weekend Masses:
Saturday: 5 p.m. and midight.
Sunday: 7:45 a.m., 9 a.m.,
10:30 a.m., noon, and 5 p.m.
(plus 9:30 a.m. North Campus).
ANN ARBOR CHURCH
OF CHRIST
530 W. Stadium Blvd.
(one block west of
U of M Stadium)
Bible Study - Sunday, 9:30
a.m.-Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.
Worship-Sunday, 10:30 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m.
Need Transportation? C a I1
662-9928.,
CAMPUS CHAPEL
Pastor: Don Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Service.

*1

DI

I

ER

'SPEC MLC l
-Dinner includes: Choice of Soup, Vegetarian
Cassarole, Salad, and Beverage.
BAKER'S BONUS
WHOLE WHEAT FLOUR
DEAF SMITH ORGANIC BREAD FLOUR-$1.25/5 LBS.
WHITE FLOUR
STONEGROUND, UNBLEACHED-$1.00/5 LBS.
SUNFLOWER SEED FREAKS!
RAW SUNFLOWER SEEDS-89c/LB.
EDEN
WHOLE EARTH GROCERY
and RESTAURANT
330 MAYNARD
10-7 MONDAY-SATURDAY

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Services. Sermon: "The Aboli-
tion of the Laity."
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Church
School for all ages.
9:00-12:30-Nursery Care.
10:30-11:00 a.m. - Coffee-Con-
versation-Fellowship.
Worship service broadcast on
WNRS (1290) AM and WNRZ
(103) FM from 11:00 to noon
each Sunday.
WESLEY FOUNDATION:
Sunday:
4:30 p.m.-What Is Commit-
ment?
6:00 p.m.-Dinner.
6:45 p.m.-Celebration.
Monday:
6:30-8:00 p.m.-TA Class and
Experience.
Thursday:
6:00 p.m.-Grad Community.
Call 483-8344 or 668-6881 for de-
tails.
* * *
UNIVERSITY CHURCH OF
THE NAZARENE
409 S. Division
M. Robert Fraser, Pastor
Church School-9:45 a.m.
Morning Worship-11:00 a.m.
Evening Worship-7:00 p.m.
* * *
ST. ANDREW'S EPSICOPAL
CHURCH, 306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Eucharist.
10:00 a.m. -Morning Prayer
and Sermon.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN
CHAPEL (LCMS)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday Services at 9:15 and
at 10:30 a.m.
Sunday Bible Study at 9:15.
Midweek Worship Wednesday
Evening at 10:00.
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
CHURCH (ALC-LCA)
(Formerly Lutheran Student
Chapel)
801 . Forest Ave. at Hill St.
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
Sunday Service at 10:30 a.n.
Try
Daily
Classifieds

UNIVERSITY CHURCH
OF CHRIST
Presently Meeting at
YM-YWCA, 530 S. Fifth
David Graf, Minister
3:00 p.m. - Sunday Worship
Service.
Students Welcome.
For information or transpor-
tation: 663-3233 or 662-2494.
* * *
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave. Ph. 665-6149
Minister: Orval L. E. Willimann
1000 a.m. - Worship Service
and Church School,
,* * *
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw
Sunday Service and Sunday
School-10:30 a.m.
Wednesday Testimony Meet-
ing-8:00 p.m.
Child Care-Sunday, under 2
years; Wednesday, through 6
years.
Reading Room - 306 E. Lib-
erty, 10-9 Mon., 10-5 Tues.-Sat.
"The Truth That Heals" -
WPAG radio, 10 a.m. Sunday.
WELCOME TO ANN ARBOR
FRIENDS MEETING
(QUAKERS)
1420 Hill St.-668-9341
(if no answer, 769-3354,
971-4875, 665-2683)r
Silent Meeting for Worship-!
Sunday, 10-11 a.m.
First Day School, nursery/
high, 10-11 a.m.
Adult Forum, 11-12.
Potluck every first Sunday,
Businessameetingevery third
Sunday after worship.
D a i 1 y Morning Meditation
(546 Walnut St.), 8:30-9 a.m.
Wednesday Sack Lunch (1073
East Engineering), 12-1 p.n.
Worship-sharing Groups (in
homes), Tues. / Wed. / Thurs.
eves.
Friday Evening Family Night
(1420 Hill St.), 7:30-11 p.m.-
s t o r i e s, discussions, games,
crafts, singing and dancing for
all ages.
American F r i e n d s Service
Committee (AFSC), 1414 Hill
St., 761-8283.
Bail & Prison Reform, 761-
8283, 761-8331.
Friends International Co-op,
1416 Hill St., 761-7435.
Friends L a k e Community,
19,720 Waterloo Rd., Chelsea,
475-8775.
Movement for a New Society
(MNS), 665-6083.
World Peace Tax Fund, Box
1447, Ann Arbor.

Cavender and Catlin
Funny man George Carlin performs at 8:00 this evening in
Hill Aud. in a benefit for Prof. George Cavender's Michigan
Marching Band. Remaining tickets are priced at $3, $4 and
$5, and will be available at the Hill Box Office from 8-12
this morning and 5-8 tonight.
MOVIES on11 V.
by MICHAEL WILSON
(Continued from Page 5) Jerry Lewis stars with Dean
it up in Send Me No Flowers Martin in this remake of Car-
(1964), an excellent black com- ole Lombard's Nothing Sacred
edy directed with style by Nor- (1937), about a sinus problem
man Jewison and also featuring that's mistaken for radiation
Tony Randall and Clint Walker. poisoning; Janet Leigh is also
Walter Matthau copped the featured.
coveted Oscar for his super- White Heat (1949) is being
human effort in part I of Billy telecast at the same time on
Wilder's Fortune Cookie (1965), a different channel (50), and I
airedon Channel 7 this Thurs- guarantee this fine gangster
day at 4:30 p.m. Jack Lemmon picture with Jimmy Cagney and
also stars in this harmless com- Edmond O'Brien will be hard
edy about fake whiplash and to compete with. Cagney is tops
what some people will do for as a crime fanatic with his
money. (The second part will mom on the brain and a point-
be shown Fri. same time, same blank gun in every hand. The
channel). picture is well directed by Raoul
Thursday night on Channel 2 Walsh and maintains a pace
at 11:30 p.m. don't miss The that is still furious for its time.
Good Die Young (1954), a fumb-
ling stream - of - consciousness If comedy, gangsters aren't
melodrama about four men your thing, tune in atrmid-
from totally different back- night on Channel 9 Saturday for
groundswho execute a terrific- some biting Lillian Hellman sen-
ally exciting armed holdup. timent in the choppy and ef-
R i c h a r d Basehart, John fective Chase (1966), starring
Ireland, Stanley Baker and Glo- Marlon Brando as a small-town
ria Grahme star. Southern sheriff with big-time
Friday night promises to be problems. The cast includes
the best in a long line of late- Robert Redford, Jane Fonda,
night weeks of tube viewing, E. G. Marshall and James Fox,
kicking off with Living It Up and the story may be obnoxious
(1954) at 11:30 on Channel 11. but Brando's acting never is.

(Continued from Page 5)
Still, Garland was not the
studio's major concern - her
faults could usually be repaired
in the cutting room. But prob-
lems with the Technicolor film
stock, naturally, could not.
Almost all of the previous ex-
perience with the prism-based
Technicolor process had been
basically unfavorable; in fact,
the only decent color print ob-
tained before 1938 was Disney's!
Snow White.
But with David O. Selznick
planning to mount the massive
Gone With The Wind in just a
few months-and in Technicolor,
studio executives decided to take
the chance and shoot Oz in the
bulky color process. Thanks to
some clutch work by director
Fleming and the best team of
technicians in Hollywood, it
worked.
World War II effectively halt-
ed large-scale musical produc-
tion at Metro, but soon there-
after the studio went back to
work with a new roster of per-
formers: Fred Astaire, Gene
Kelly, Frank Sinatra, Donald
O'Connor, and Esther Williams.
Astaire and Kelly were the
last really great actors to grace
the Metro musical, but they
were also probably the best of
the entire lot. Both could es-
tablish a character or a mood
just by a small movement or
step, almost like the immortall
Chaplin.
Who would ever have imagin-
ed that there could be anything!
sensual about a man dancing!
with atwooden hat rack? But
as Astaire demonstrated in
Royal Wedding, even inanimate
objects contain an underlying
sense of motion-all they need
is the proper artist to bring
them to life. (Funny that the
expressionist art movement had
shown the same thing back in
the early part of the century.)
Kelly, meanwhile, was the
consumate choreographer. In
An American in Paris, Kelly and
director Vincent Minelli used
stylized motion and bold light-
ing to evoke an atmosphere of
cinema erotique. The simple
shadow-a device employed in
recent Truffaut and Bergman
pictures-worked for Kelly and
Minelli as a tool to separate and
define the two sides of Gersh-
win's Paris: the bawdy and the
glamorous.

Shortly after Kelly, Astaire,
and Sinatra left MGM in the
late '50s, the great musical
machine began the long trek
downhill. It soon became clear
that television had relieved
movies of the audience that at
one time would eagerly sit
through untold minutes of banal
story and script just to ooh an
aah at the few bouncy musical
sequences.
Unfortunately, Metro execu-
tives found that impossible to
accept until the studio was al
tually on the brink of ban'
ruptcy.
The effects of the musical
genre linger on, however. When
science fiction author Michael
Crichton directed Westworld at
MGM last year, he wanted t.
use several large studio sets to
simulate the control center of
his futuristic amusement park.
The lighting problems involved
might have been insurmount-
able at other studios-but not
at MGM. Metro technicians just
remounted the massive old
"chicken coop" fixtures that
had lit the biggest of the sing-
ing spectaculars, and Westworld
was underway.
But of course, the musical is
not entirely dead. Some recent
"tuners"-most notably Cabaret
-have managed to succeed both
critically and financially. And,
after all, there is every reason
to believe that a musical film--
if produced with the more dis-
criminating tastes of the modern
cinema audience in mind-could
indeed be just as successful as
a straight picture.
Yet therein lies the magic
question-can Hollywood forget
40 years of singing and dancing
tradition and learn to use music
the way European filmmakers
have for decades? Perhaps we
will find out when Peter Bog-
danovich's At Long Last LoO
and Robert Altman's as yet un-
titled countrytmusical arrie
early next year.
Have a flair for
artistic writinq?
If you are interest-
ed in reviewing
poetry, and music
or writing feature
stories ab o ut the
drama, dance, film
arts: Contact Arts
Editor, c/o The
Michigan Daiy.

..

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i

r

I-,

CONDOLANCES to MSU from:

BIVOUAC
The world's best camping equipment aT
the best price in town. 330 S. STATE ST.
CABLE 3 TV
You can see the game at 1 1 a.m. on Sun.,
Oct. 13, and 6 p.m. on Tues., Oct. 15.
CAMPUS CORNERS
Stop by on the way to the game.
PACKARD & STATE
CHECKMATE
The store for Levi's.
302 S. STATE
COTTAGE INN
The oldest pizza parlor in Ann Arbor
512 E. WILLIAM

MARTY'S-SOUTH U
Have you been in to see us yet?
Great threads!
MOE SPORT SHOPS
711 NORTH UNIVERSITY
902 SOUTH STATE
NATIONAL BANK &
TRUST CO. OF ANN ARBOR
Over 81 years of continuous banking service
to Ann Arbor and Washtenaw County
THE PERSIAN HOUSE
OF IMPORTS
Largest selection of hand-made sheep skin
coats for men & women, 1/2 off.
320 E. LIBERTY-769-8555

BEAT THE
CREAM

DASCOLA BARBERS
& STYLISTS
from the class of M '36

DAVID'S BOOKS
Books and evertyhing 25 % off
662-8441-529 E. LIBERTY
DELTA CHI FRATERNITY
and their little sister Chi Delphia say
GO BLUE-Beat MSU!

STADIUM RESTAURANT
& PIZZERIA
Featuring Greek menu 4 days a week
338 S. STATE
TICE'S MEN'S SHOP
Levis and formal wear
1111 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
ULRICH'S BOOKS INC.
Ann Arbor's friendly book store
549 EAST UNIVERSITY
VAN BOVEN INC.
Fine clothing, furnishings and

OUTU

OF

EDEN'S FOOD
Dinner Plate Special $2.00
330 MAYNARD-761-8134

lilt'

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