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October 10, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-10

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 10, 1974

BEGINNING SUNDAY

Germans select spouses

4ma

T.V.

BONN (Reuter) - Germans i
looking for a wife or husband
will in the future be able to
select a likely mate from the
television screen in the privacy
of their own homes.
Starting next Sunday, German
television will run a 50-minute
marriage market program once
a month. Even before the series
begins, as a result of advance
press publicity, hundreds of;
men and women seeking part-
ners have applied to appear be-J
fore the cameras.I

THE SERIES, entitled "Mar-
riage Not Excluded," has as its
theme song an early Beatles
number, "Love Me Do."
The first three candidates for
the altar are two 28-year-old
women, one a commercial artist
and one a school teacher, and a
30-year-old male glass engraver.
In an informal conversation
with a television reporter around
a table, they will chat about
their private lives, jobs and
hobbies and describe the sort
of person they would like to

marry.
VIEWERS WILL be shown
pictures of the candidates'
homes and their surroundings
so that viewers can form an
impression of the type of people
they are and their backgrounds.
The "Lonely Hearts" will be
introduced by their first names.
Their identities and addresses
will not be made public and
applicants wishing to make con-
tact with them will have to
write care of the television stu-
dios in Cologne and the letters
will be passed on unopened.
The program, described by
a Cologne newspaper as "the
craziest idea of the year," stems
from stage and television author
Tankred Dorst and director
Guenter Rohrbach.
TELEVISION in West Ger-
many is run by public corpora-
tions under the supervision of
the state. For the last four years
one television channel has run a
mock divorce court as a drama-
tized form of marriage guid-
ance.
But this 'is the first time the
medium has set itself up as
an active broker to establish
relations between individual
HAO ToALONG
HIRSTYLES TO PLEASE~

viewers. Producer Rolf Spinrads
said, "We had to overcome a
good many taboos."
One of the show's attractions
for the financially hard-up tele-
vision stations is that it prom-
ises to be a highly popular pro-
gram that will cost next to
nothing. At first it was thought
that people would be too shy
to reveal their private lives in
public and admit they were
looking for someone.
THE FIRST appeal for volun-
teers, placed in newspaper
"agony columns," brought no
response. Then the studio sent
two women out to make a
direct approach to likely look-
ing candidates in department
stores, at universities or simply
on the street.
In a short time they had over
100, from whom a dozen were
ultimately selected.
The only incentive offered is
the chance of finding a mar-
riage partner. Apart from their
out-of-pocket expenses and pos-
sible compensation for loss of
earnings, the candidates re-
ceive no money.
"We will not know whether it
works until we get the first pic-
ture postcard from a honey-

moon couple," Spinrads said.
THE TELEVISION marriage
market is to be followed later
this year by a similar type of
social program where the screen
will be used to try to find foster-
parents for orphaned or home-
less children.
Hundreds of marriage bureaus
exist in West Germany. They
advertise their services in news-
papers and exist by charging
fees to their clients, in return
for which they send them the
names and addresses and photos
of suitable prospects.
But marriage by mail can be
a strange business and many a
young man has gone on a blind
date with beating heart and a
bunch of roses to find the photo
he has fallen in love with was
taken some years earlier.
IF THE television road to the
altar catches on, the conven-
tional marriage brokers are in
for a lean time.
The television producers term
their marriage program a
"talkshow with a purpose."
Even before its first broad-
cast, a love-letter has already
arrived for one of the two un-
named and unseen brides-to-be.

I

AP Photo
Black youth taken into custody
Members of the Boston Police tactical force take a black youth into custody yesterday during
a disturbance in the Roxbury section of Boston. Around 200 black youths roamed through a
three-square-block area throwing stones.
BURGOYNE, ALEXANDER DEBATE:

Guerrillas release

fluuanuay a 0vfna _ 1-
10 A.M. Noon 763-4384 A7 7ASCOLA
10 AM-NonBARBERS seven cp
MAPLE VILLAGE-761-2733
E. LIBERTY-668-9329 (Continued from Page 1)
C E. UNIVERSITY-662-0354 I
I-- - duct."
The four men and three wo-
men captives were engulfed by
happy friends and relatives
when they stepped out the door
of the Venezuelan consulate.
"SUDDENLY I became a
tremendous bargain," said
BIVO UAC American diplomat Barbarai
Hutchison at a news confer-I
ence a few hours after her re-
lease. "I went from a million
ato nothing."
toHutchison said the most diffi-
cult thing had been "the wait-
The World's Best Camping Equipment ing and then the various crises
as they occur . . . We were, of
course, very short on water,
at the Best Price in Town and it's amazing how much
water matters, even more than
food.",
The 47-year-old director of
the U. S. Information Service
Ofikng Bo t here said she was "not mis-
treated at all, although there
were many tense moments."
wShespoke after showering and
Kastinger * Down Ves /dining at the home of U. S. Am-
bassador Robert Hurwitch.
THE WIFE OF another host-
age, Venezuelan Vice-Consul
Waldemar Alvarado, shouted,
*6d0/40 Parkas TEMPORARY
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330 S. STATE ST. 1 day to 2 weeks
ANY ADULT(S)
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Lives, flee
"Thanks to God! Thanks to
God!" as the hostages were
freed.
ne
ofGod.
yor way.
i' RIAL
onunmacunit
E LIIO IN MRCNL
-
,Ac~. dTuq,,, TIM.~ . IWmee

Judge
(Continued from Page 1)
legalizing marijuana," said
Alexander. "No matter what
quantities" are involved, he
said, no criminal penalties
should be assessed for use or
possession.
BURGOYNE, ON the other
hand, declared that a number of
questions about the effects of
marijuana use have not yet
been scientifically answered.
"Given those circumstances",
she said, "I don't feel mari-
juana should be legalized."
The pair differed little on the
other issues discussed last
night. Both candidates said
that victimless crimes include
drug addictionl, sexual prefer-
ence, and otherssocio-medical
problems.
They agreed that such of-
fences should not be punished
by jail sentences.
ALEXANDER AND Burgoyne
both said that the judicial sys-
tem should be made less for-
mal.
"A more casual atmosphere
should exist in the courtroom",
Burgoyne said. "Because of the
present formality, those ac-
cused of crimes often don't un-
derstand the charges against
them."
Alexander said that the cur-
rent - judicial process "it pa-
thetic" and that the judge can
help change that by setting a
less formal tone in court.

hopefuls speak

CURRENTLY A l e x a n d e r
serves as the county's public
defender - a post he has held
since its inception two years
ago.
Burgoyne, a local attorney,
narrowly lost a bid for a Wash-'
tenaw County Circuit Court
judgeship in 1972. She has also
been active in Octagan House, a
local drug treatment center,

and the Women's Crisis Center.
In the August primary elec-
tion, Burgoyne and Alexande
defeated three other candidate
for the right to vye for the non
partisan judgeship. in the No
vember election.
BURGOYNE received abou
3,500 primary votes to approx
imately 2,300 for Alexander.

lDhsab led students
assisted by DSS'

(Continued fromPage 1)
cases and other such things.
Finally, the material will be
put together and distributed.
The office is looking for peo-
ple to help with this entirely
volunteer - based project. Stop
by att4119 Michigan Union or
call at 763-3000.
DSS HAS LOTS of other
plans on the drawing board as
well. One is to provide trained
attendants for the more severe-
ly handicapped students. The
need for this service, Watson
predicts, will increase quite a
bit in the near future.'
He says more handicapped
people will be attracted here
due to a $309,000 fund which the
Engineering department has al-

SH OP
AT
FOLLETT'S
For Textbooks, Trade books
& Paperbacks
"A FULL SERVICE
BOOKSTORE"

I

ABS LUTECLEARANCE
Comlet, fnal onall merchandise--Hardbacks, paperbacks, prints and 1975 Calendars
Disounedbooks are further discounted! Over 1/ acre of books must go! For example,
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the book is no longer available in New
York. Text by Jacques Thuillier with cata- 0
log and a Documentary History by Jac- Orig. Publisher's Price $5.0e
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A FR iCA
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FRIDAY NIGHT at
HILLEL
Shabbath Circle-6:00 p.m.
Minyan-6:30
Shabbat Dinner-7 :30
Dinner reservations by 1:00Cp.m.)Friday)
Saturday Minyan-9:0 a.m.
H IL L EL-1429 H iII- 663 -4129

located for renovating campus
facilities, making them more
accessible to wheelchairs.
The continuous help provided
by the Engineering Department
'in renovating facilities has
greatly benefited DSS. George
Selim, the Senior Engineer, was
involved in helping DSS for
severalyearsbefore students;
administration or government
were interested at all in the
service.
LOTS OF RENOVATION has
been necessary. Since 1966,
state building codes have re-
quired all public buildings to
have sufficient acces-z"-ility to
wheelchairs. A newer law go-
ing into effect this December
will force this accessibility to
an even greater extent.
One of the main problems
which beset the plans of DSS in
the past was the lack of aware-
ness about disabled students on
the part of University adminis-
trators, which often caused the
students to seek other institu-
tions. Howevei, following sev-
eral "awareness talks," thesad-
ministration and community
have become more informed i
the problems and abilities o
disabled students.
The problems for DSS hay
shifted from minimal response
to minimal funds. Operatinga
University fund allotments on-
ly, Watson must be economical
in his plans for the future.
1DESPITE THE problem, how-
ever, he continues to count on
rthe continuity of the services
and is planning such additional,
I programs as helping the stu-1
dents develop their job inter-
view skills and self-salesman-
ship and providing a Braille
I meap of the University like one
already in use at Eastern Michi-
Sgan.

NOlwOPEN!
Oyster Bar & The Spaghetti Machine
OPEN TUESDAY THRU SATURDAY, 5:00-10:00 P.M.
(CORNER OF WEST HURON & S. FIRST ST.)

301 W. HURON

663-2403

MENU:

FRESH BLUE POINT OYSTERS ON HALF SHELL ................$1.75
DINNERS: Green Salad-CAESAR dressinc, home made bread, butter and coffee included.
SPAGHETTI:

1. Tomato sauce..... ..

2.
3.
4.
5.

Meat sauce................
Mushroom sauce ............
Meat and Mushroom sauce ....
Red Clam sauce ............

$2.50
$2.50
$2.50
$2.50
$2.75

8. Chicken Liver sauce .........
9. Tomato sauce with Meat Bols .
10. Tomato sauce with
Chicken Livers.............
1 1. Marinara sauce ...........
12. Butter, Garlic,

$2.75
$2.75
$2.75
$2.75
ItT sa

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