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October 04, 1974 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-04

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I A L I at % 0

Page Eight

T f 1 f- l f f /- f f t

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, Ct0 eC l

Page Eight [HE MICH1~5AN UAlLY l-riday, October '1, I '9 f'*

rIOT JAZZ
FLIP JACKSON QUARTET
T THURSDAY-FRI DAY-SATURDAY
9:30 P.M.-1 :30 A.M.
-NO COVER-
HURON HOTEL & LOUNGE
124 Pearl-Ypsilanti
Phone 483-1771
Liberty at Division 769-8030
FREE DELIVERY
!!!!!........w.............--w--.-.
I ,
I ONE COUPON PER PIZZA /
MR. PIZZA
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T NickelBe r
i Is Back.
r ~with ilunch at
Village Bel
Monday-Friday
11 :b a.m.-3:O0 p.M.
Subscribe to The Daily ,

PLAYOFFS TOMORROW

By LEBA HERTZc
A team that surged from last
place to first and a team that
led its division all year vie for
the National League pennantt
this year.I
The Pittsburgh Pirates underl
manager Danny Murtaugh host1
the Los Angeles Dodgers undert
manager Walter Alston tomor-
row in the first game of thel
best out of five series.
THE DODGERS, who took
first place last April 14 andc
never relinquished it, won their
first division title in eight years.
Finishing four games ahead ofi
the Cincinnati Reds with a 102-
60 record (besgt in the majors).

buLg/tt I
(Mike) Marshall and that was
all we needed."
WYNN, WHO the Dodgers
acquired in a trade with Hous-!
ton for pitcher Claude Osteen

F

Dodge rs

-U-1- - - - :UVt UC n111 LIM 1 1 Z1,
Los Angeles is one of the more
well rounded teams in the ma-
--- - --jor leagues this year.
ZZ9 YAK ." Outfielder Bill Buckner said,
"We've got to be the favorites
H+ENTI RE BO KSHOPS now. We're a good team right
now and we'll be even better
336 MAYNARD next year. The way I see us
now, we're set to be on rop for
This is the sort of book that makes lthe next five years."
CENTICORE the m os t interesting Second baseman Dave Lopes
badds, "I knew all along we were
H bookshop around . Ecapable of winning this division.
THE COMPLETE ENGRAVINGS OF Winning this first one is a lot
DIDEROT'S ENCYCLOPEDIA' more difficult. . . . We had a
1 greatlast season but didn't win.
Facsimile edition-the first in nearly 200 years-of the Then we made those two super
Sgreat "Encyclopedie ou Dictionnaire Raisonne des Sciences, .trdsfr(i)Wn ad
' des Arts et des Metiers" of Diderot, d'Alembert and others trades for (Jim) Wynn and
Y',l Originally published between 1751 and 1772, they contain -
over 3,000 individual copperplate engravings portraying
the trades, crafts, industries, machinery, tools, manufactur- EstateAuction
ing processes and technical knowledge of the 18th century,
a stunninq history in pictures of the beginnings of ourS
technical knowledge, and one of the greatest achievements i SATURDAY MORNING,
of the rational spirit of man. Nearly 300 categories of ' OCT. 5
human knowledge, from agriculture and architecture to at 10:00 a.m.
p copperworina, diamond cuttina, mineralogv, printing, up- :
upholstering, watchmaking, wood engraving, etc.-each in a Located 3 miles west of Hell,
series showing everv step in a process. Included are overall Michian on Hiahway D-32 I
. views, scenes of workers at their tasks, cutaway drawings, to Graves Road and 1/4 mile
j floor plans, etc., beautifully engraved with the finest 18th north.
' century craftsmanship. Bound in six double volumes, in 'r An interesting sale of antique
calf-skin with raised bands, simulating the binding of the 'Y articles including round oak
original Encyclopedie. Meticulously printed and bound in itable, oak icebox, milk safe,
Laussane. Limited edition-200 sets, each one numbered.+ other antique furniture, clocks,
This is the sort of price that makes piano w/bench, some wicker
T stfpurniture, pot belly heating
CENTICORE the best place to shop . . . stove, and many more old and
4M ite tino items.

t
j
i
i
r
j
i

has been one of the reasons the1
Dodgers won their division. In
his first season as a Dodger,
the 'Toy Cannon' had 32 homet
runs (third in the National
League) and 105 runs batted inl
(fourth in the NL).r
Mike Marshall, who was ac-
quired from Montreal for veter-
an Willie Davis, has been at
phenomenon this year, appear-
ing in 105 ballgames, a majorI
league record.
The Dodgers are not, l'ow-t
ever, a two man team. Accord-i
ing to pitcher Don Sutton, "No
one man won it for us and no
one man lost it for us."
LOS ANGELES can claim
good hitters in first baseman
Steve Carvey, outfilder Buck-
ner, and third baseman Ron1
Cey, among others.t
Garvey had the best year of'
his career, collecting 200 hits,1
21 home runs, 111 RBI's and a
batting average of .312.
Buckner led all Dodger regu-
lars in hitting with a .314 bat-
ting average.
Cey setga club record for
runs batted in for a third base-
man with 97.
Shortstop Bill Russell, who
batted .271, and right fielder
Willie Crawford, who hit .295,
should also add to LA hiting
in the playoffs.
THE CATCHING duties are
shared by Steve Yeager, a fine
defensive catcher, and Je F'er-
gnson, who had 16 home runs
as saw spot duty in right field.
The Dodger pitching staff,
should be able to handle the
Pirate hitters. Messersmith is
the ace of the staff with a 20-6.

He is the only 20 game winner,
in the National League.l
When Tommy John, 13-6, was1
sidelined with an injury Jujy 17,1
Sutton, who was 6-7 at the time,,
picked up his pace and finished
with a 19-9 record.
DOUG RAU, who replaced'
Osteen on the staff, won 13
games. Al Downing and firmer1
Michigan pitcher Geoff .Zahn
round off the Dodgers' starters.
The Pittsburgh Pirates were
in last place with a 37-49 record,
the worst in baseball, on July
14. The Bucs made a comenack
by winning 51 of their last 76
games to capture the division;
title by one and a half games
in the NL East.
The Pirates won 8 out of 12
games from the Dodgers in the
regular season this year.
Murtaugh said of the Pirates,
"I think we have some pretty
good players. . . I would have
to say this club is not going to
get the recognition it deserves.
We were so far back and they
had to play great baseball."
OUTFIELDER Al Oliver bat-

ted .321 (second in the NL), and
had 198 hits, 38 doubles and 12
triples making him one of the
prime candidates for MVP this
year.
Richie Zisk was one rf the
leading batters this year with
an average .313, while Willie
Stargell continues to give Pitts-
burgh awesome power.
Manny Sanguillan is possibly
the fastest catcher in the major
leagues. He hit about .280 this
year.
THE PIRATES traded Dave
Cash to Philadelphia and Milt
May to boost their pitching
staff, obtaining Ken Brett and
Jerry Reuss for the duo.
Although Dock Ellis will not
pitch in the playoffs due to an
injury, he won eight games in
a row after a 3-8 start. Brett,
Reuss and Jim Rooker should
provide fine pitching for the
Pirates in the playoffs.
The bullpen, with righthander
Dave Giusti and lefthander Ra-
mon Hernandez should be able
to aid the Pirate starters if
they get in trouble.

1i

Gridde Picks

mo -om J

1. MICHIGAN at Stanford
(pick score)
2. California at Illinois
3. West Virginia at Indiana
4. Iowa at USC.
5. Notre Dame at Michigan

6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

State
Minnesota at Nebraska
Oregon at Northwestern
Ohio State at Washington
St.
Purdue at Duke
Missouri at Wisconsin

11. Alabama at Mississippi
12. LSU at Florida
13. Va. Military vs. Virginia
Tech. (at Richmond)
14. Pittsburgh at N. Carolina
15. Georgia at Clemson
16. Richmond at Furman
17. Western Michigan at Kent
State
18. Navy at Boston College
19. Pennsylvania at Brown
20. DAILY LIBELS vs. Edit
Staff Flunkies

4I

n eresn gtem.
SAnyMediumnor Larger Pizza 'The six volume set WAS $675.00PKE
* PEARLE KIRTLAND ESTATE
Offer Good Friday & Saturday CENTICORE'S price $395.00 William J. Stanton and
V Stephen E. Stanton,
October4 & 5 Auctioneers
October 4&T5 This is CENTICOREPh
(517) 726-0181
ABRNOLUTE CLEARANCE
43/00
BO K ALE
C4
Complete, final, on all merchandise-Hardbacks, paperbacks, prints and 1975 Calendars
Discounted books are further discounted! Over 1/2 acre of Books MUST go! For Example,'
n,
405
CENTENNIAL James A. icerr. A moior novel about the size of Hawaii, JOY OF SEX. ed. Alex Comfort. This is not a pseudonymn. Comfort w
' with a fictional count. characters and true psychological history. Patiently, writing scholarly, psycholoical books in the 1940s, until one evening,
winding through time and mind. Michener gradually brings into focus a while sipping a B&B and readina the Kama Sutra, hs wife's copy of JOY
huge collage of the American early West to 1973. Epic. Published this OF COOKING unexplainedly fell from a shelf into his lap. Both books
month at $10.95. SALE $8.76 were disbound in the fall and the pages hopelessly intermersed. Comfort,
seeing the appropriateness of it all, felicitiously repaginated in hs own
WORKING by Studs Terkel. Studs i-s a live wire, and only a down to earth intimate way. Now appropriately in softbound at $4.95. SALE $3.96 1
man could get thistoether. Like enerations of American writers, Terkel MCA
is trying to find e nd kat workin people of felds, omort. ovemakin
carpenter to hooker to former. He lets people talk about what they do and SEX." The seguel emphasizes relationships, people, etc. with such chapter
how they feel about it. A scurce hook on America. PubI. at $10.00. headings as Language of ihe Body, Special Needs, and Couples and Others.
SALE $8.00 Both books are destined to become an important part of our thinking and
t feeling since they are to be at least partly the basis of future sexual
AMERICA by Alister Cooke. The book that came -from his remarkable counseling. Just published ct $12.95. SPECIAL SALE-
documentary film, AMERICA is a look through the lens of history to find
out how we got where we :.re. A very visual book with lush illustrations,
~~ ?t
it caphures much of the ailemma and wonder of- America, with a fine
sauce of nostalgia. PubI. at $15.00 SALE $12.00
& DISCOUNT BOOKS ARE FURT HER REDUCED 20%
S4nn- 1
~1i n Snte'Siv~p* ~n~ 9 nm -9 n Mn -~ct' 1-~Sijcln

ZOU 2Cl

easy listening sounds
live entertainment every
Sunday 5-8 p.m.
serving:
deep dish sicilian pizza
NO COVER

310

4,
. a '
,

Geography and Planning:
THE SOCIAL SCIENTIST'S ROLE IN
SHAPING THE FUTURE
MINI COURSE 414, Div. 495, 1 Cr Hr (See also symposium announcement)
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING at noon, Friday, October 4, Rm. 4050 LSA Bldg.
SIX LECTURES to be held in Room 200 Lane Hall .
Monday, Tuesday and Thursday, October 7, 8, and 10:
4-6 P.M.-TORSTEN HAGERSTRAND: "The Conception of Man in
Postindustrial Society"
8-10 P.M.-AKIN MABOGUNJE: "Rural Development Processes: A Theoretical
Wilderness"
ENROLL AT GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT, 4028 LSA BUILDING
For further information please contact Prof. Gunnar Olsson, Department of Geography, Tel.
764-0339, or 761-3195.
GEOGRAPHY SYMPOSIUM III
Georgraphy and Social Action:
CHANGING GOALS IN A TRADITIONAL DISCIPLINE
The public is invited to attend the following lectures to be held of he
Rackham Amphitheatre.
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 9
10-12-DAVID HARVEY, Prof. of Geography and Environmental Engineering,
Johns Hopkins University: "Urbanization and Capital"
Commentator: Bernard Marchand. University of Toronto
9 r9 ,_mTADTF UNAGERTRANDfrnf of HmanGe oroohv.U niversitv of Lund,

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