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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 02, 1974 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TLWc kA ir~l('A KI n r A I -~-

Page Eight

I rlt I..i IiUiAN LJAIL

Wvednesday, Ucrober Z, ;TI'-j

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UNIVERSITY THEATRE PROGRAMS announces 4 DISTINGUISHED PRODUCTIONS in the
POWER CENTER for the performing arts

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Aristophanes

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IAC~uesi A*1ist nHesc *e"
PATRICK CRlF Mi
S"a+!o e ir o+, c t o ! f~i .:

SINGLE SHOWS ON

SMORGASBORD

West Coast woes

SALE TODAY !

tickets in Mendelssohn lobby-764-0450
--. - - - ---- -

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ANN ARBOR'S

NEWEST

WEDNESDAYS 6-9 p.m.
AND
SATURDAYS 6-9 p.m.
$3.95
1. cold vichysoisse
2. coq au vin
3. potatoes anna
4, shrimp newburgh
5. boeuf burguingnone
6. rice
7. swedish meat balls
8. vermicelli
9. breaded veal cutlet
10. fresh garden green
11. tarragon peas
12. eggplant parmesan
13. beef oriental
14. veal hearts
15. chicken giblets
16. cheese casserole
17. sliced beef
18. fried chicken
19. barbecued ribs
20. fried cod fish
21. black olives
22. greek olives
23. green olives
24. dill pickles
25 celery
26. carrots
27. green onions
28. crab apples
29. red peppers
30. radishes
31. corn salad
32. sliced cucumbers
with sour cream
33. sliced tomatoes
with fresh dil
34. red bean salad
35. greek bean salad
36. Italian green peppers
37. greek stuffed eggplants
38. sliced beets
39. garlic sauce
40. herring
41. portuguese sardines
42. anchovies
43. cod fish caviar mousse
44. cod fish red caviar
45. liver pate
46, sliced jambon
47 sliced salami
48. sliced cold turkey
49. chicken salad
50. russian fish salad
51. tuna fish salad
52. sliced mushroom in
dill sauce
54. eggrolls
55. hot mustard sauce
56. stuffed eggs bonnefemme
57. cole slaw
58. cold salmon
59. fresh tuna in soyu sauce
60. butter
61. home made bread
62. sliced tongue
63. horse radish sauce
64. chicken wings Japanese
65. fried squid
66. smoked pork chops
67. potato salad
68. russan salad
69. macaroni salad
70. Jellied fruit salad
71. tossed green salad
72. chef's dressing
73. french dressing
74. 1000 island dressing
75. russian dressing
76. tartar sauce
77. hot sauce
78. bacon crumbs
79. croutons
80. parmesan cheese
81. sliced onions
82. eggplant salad
83. hocktail sausage
84. hors d'oeuvres
85. stuffed grapeleaves
86. greek feta cheese
87. swiss cheese
88. cheddar cheese
89. bread pudding
90. rice pudding
91. creme caramel
92. baked apples
93. house cake
94. peaches
95. mandarin organges
96. organe sliced candies
97. bananas
98. grapes
99. apples
100. watermelon balls
&4IGdi ft

CONTINENTAL DINING
102 S. FIRST 663-2401

By JON CHAVEZ
The Pacific Eight had
a very bad habit for B
fans. Every season M
and Ohio State would
each other for the Ros
bid, and the victor woul
west only to lose the
Bowl showdown.
Cries of "west coa
premacy" and "shatter(
Ten prestige" were tem
ily silenced by Ohio;
42-21 thrashing of So
California last January.
Just three weeks in
1974 season, one can tri
say the Pac-8 does not h
Big Ten to kick aroun
more. Big Ten teams h
umphed in four of five(
ments with four more scl
this weekend.
John McKay, head co
nationally 9th ranked
however, expressed co
"We're not as strong
year. Maybe we've stay
the road too long," he
McKay's reference to

Pac ific
road" was a reminder that the
a habit, Pac-8's only win over a Big
ig Ten Ten opponent came in its only
ichigan home contest, Michigan State
battle at UCLA.
e Bowl "It could be we're a little
d head slow getting started," sa<
Rose UCLA coach Dick Vermeil. "]
don't think we're about to panic
st su- Conferences go up and down.
ed Big thought Iowa played well anc
porar- deserved to win. I'd like ti
State's think though, that we coult
uthern beat them four out of five
times," he added.
ito the Statistics, as any coach wil
uthfully tell you, do not tell the whole
ave the story.
d any-
ve tri- To illustrate the point, Pac-i
engage- teams, which play four non
hgeduled conference games each, hav
compiled a 11-12-2 record so fai
>ach of this season. This looks goof
USC alongside 1973's 12-19-1 total.
ncern. Last year though, tradition-
g this al west coast powers USC,
yed on UCLA, and Stanford accumu-
said. lated seven of those wins and
"the I the tie. After the third week

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Sports of The Daily

AND BEST

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Eight
this season, the big three
stands 2-4-2.
With the pride of the Pac-8
wallowing in mediocracy, last
year's also-rans (which had 15
of last -season's 19 defeats) are
tearing up their competition.
Their nine victories, however,
have come over such powers as
San Jose State (17-16), Idaho
(17-10) and Army (27-14).
The only major victories on
the Pac-8's ledger are UCLA's
16-7 win over previously 8th
ranked Pittsburgh and UCLA's
56-14 drubbing of Michigan
State.
Despite these facts, many
far west observers say the Pac-
8 is anything but weak.
"I think the Pacific Eight
is stronger this year," com-
mented Oregon coach Don
Read. It may be the teams
we're playing are stronger,
I don't know. But we (Oregon)
are stronger, I know that."
None of the Pac-8 coaches
said any pressure exists to
avenge last year's Rose Bowl
defeat.
"I don't think there's,. any
pressure. What's important is
they play well," responded
Read. "In bowl games you can't
look at one team. What you look
at is the conference being beat-
en as a whole, are the scores
impressive, and who are they
nlaying. I think that's the only
way you can judge a confer-
ence," he said.
Vermeil, Christiansen, and
Read all agreed that USC would
probably be the team to beat
in the Pac-8 race this season.
McKay didn't think so however.
"I thought we were going
to be better, but we're aver-
age this year," he admitted.
"I thought we were it going
in, but I haven't seen any in-
dication that we're any better
than the other teams."
Whatever the Pacific Eight's
real problems, the Big Ten
seems to be alive and well
again. However, as McKay later
added, "If the Big Ten is back,
Michigan and Ohio State may
have a tougher time getting out
here."j

.3
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NIGHT SPOT
Dance To Live Rock 'N Roll
Every Night Of the Week

By wire service reports
Pro hoop notes
Wilt "The Stilt" Chamberlain, the most prolific scorer in the
history of the NBA, will announce his retirement this week ac-
cording to published reports. After pulling down nearly 24,000
rebounds and scoring over 31,000 points in a superb 14-year
career in the NBA, Chamberlain jumped to the ABA last year
as~ a player-coach. "The Stilt" will be best remembered for
leading the 76ers and Lakers to an NBA title apiece as well as
the incredible feat of scoring 100 points in one game against the
Knicks in 1962.
Another old, and now new, 76er by the name of Billy
Cunningham has jumped back to the NBA team after spend-
ing the last two seasons as a Carolina Cougar in the ABA.
Cunningham practices with the 76ers and plans to play for
them in the exhibition season. Legal complications abound
as his old team, now the St. Louis Spirits after an off-season
move, try to retain Cunningham's services for the final year
of his contract.
Meanwhile,Detroit coach Ray Scott signed a new three year
contract with the NBA Pistons.
Mets name general manager
The New York Mets named 45-year-old Joe McDonald to the
post of general manager, succeeding Bob Scheffing who stepped
down recently after five years in the job. McDonald, who began
his association with the Mets as a statistician in 1962, is the
fifth general manager in the 12 year history of the club. Noting
that the Mets' main problem this season has been a lack of
hitting, McDonald remarked. "Hopefully we will make some
trades but it's still in the formative stage."
To all Present & Prospective English Majorrs:
1st MEETING of an
ENGLISH UNDERGRADUATE
ASSOCIATION
THURSDAY EVENING, Oct. 3-8:00 P.M.
West Conference Room, 4th Floor Rackham Bldg.
(REFRESHMENTS WILL BE SERVED)

Billboard
Those interested in trying
out for the Michigan base-
ball team should attend the
fall baseball tryouts begin-
ning Friday, October 4th. The
sessions will be held every
Monday, Thursday and Fri-
day from 4:30 p.m. to 6:00
p.m. at Fisher Stadium.
Bring your own spikes, glove
and ball.

This week featuring

"TEN HIGH"
End those
afternoon hunger

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with lunch at

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CHANCES ARE

From I1 a.m.-6:30 p.m.

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516 E. Liberty

Evenings:

8 p.m.-2 a.m.

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- mmmij

DIMENSIONS OF RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE
LECTURE AND DISCUSSION SERIES
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 3-5 P.M., ANGELL HALL, AUD. A.
"THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE
CONSCIOUSNESS OF HUMANITY"
by VIMALA THAKAR, a spiritually whole woman from India
NEXT WEEK: Oct. 9,3-5 p.m., Angell Hall, Aud. A.
ON THE ORIGINALITY OF THE TEACHINGS
OF THE BUDDHA
by UPENDRA J. MAHARATHI. Buddhist Scholar
Sponsored by Office of Ethics and Reliqinon, 3rd floor, Michiqan Union, 764-7442

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WRCN and ANN ARBOR MUSIC MART

present

"A CONCERT OF SYNTHESIZED MUSIC"
FEATURING .. .
TOM PICKETT & MIKE BRIGIDA from ARP SYNTHESIZERS
two of the finest players of musical synthesizers in U.S.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2 - 8-10 p.m.
n the ASSEMBLY HALL of the MICHIGAN UNION
They will perform music by Billy Preston, Stevie Wonder, Chicago,
the Beatles, Herbie Hancock, Deodoto, and more.
Don't Miss This FREE Concert;

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EIGHTEEN?

If you're 18 or over, live and work in Ann Arbor, or are a student
at U. of M. (even if you pay out of state tuition), you can vote
in Ann Arbor.
In recent elections Ann Arbor voters have been able to vote for
the $5 marijuana fine and rent control. In November, in addition
to electing a state representative, member of U.S. Congress, state
senator, and county commissioners from the Ann Arbor area,
voters will be considering another ballot issue, preferential vot-
ing, a method of electing Ann Arbor's mayor that insures that
the election indicates the preference of a majority of the electo-
rate. And, more ballot issues are planned for the spring.
REGISTER AT:
" CITY HALL, between 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday
(corner of Huron & 5th)
" COMMUNITY CENTER, 625 N. Main, 9-5,

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