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October 02, 1974 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1974-10-02

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Wednesday, October 2, 1974
lop in biographer on

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

singer
By STEPHEN HERSH
EDITOR'S NOTE - Myra
Friedman, author of the Janis
Joplin biography Buried Alive,
worked as a writer with rock
manager Albert Grossman
from the summer of 1967 un-
fil 1970. Holding that kind of
job leads to "pretty extren-
sive contact with perform-
ers," says Friedman, and it
was while she held that job
that she became acquainted
with such performers as Bob
Dylan, the members of the
Band, Paul Butterfield, Mi-
chael Bloomfield, and above
all Janis Joplin. Friedman
worked with Joplin until the
singer's death, and claims to
have known her "about as
well as you can possibly know
anybody."
Friedman spoke on the ef-
fect of drugs in Joplin's life
last Thursday afternoon to a
University class in Drugs, So-
ciety and Human Behavior.
She stopped here before
catching a plane home to
New York, after being inter-
viewed in Detroit several
times on the subject of her
book.
"Janis was an alcoholic,"
said Friedman. "She drank
since she was 15, and drank
just all the time.
"When she started out using
heroin, it was just once in a
while, and she would drink a lot
during the days inbetween so
it took her an awfully long time
to get strung out. If somebody
does heroin continuously, with-
out taking any other drugs in-
between, it can take just a
couple of weeks. With Janis, it

s use of drugs

took much longer than that.
"By the summer of '69 she
was really strung out. Her be-
havior was not the classic jun-
kie behavior because she had
lots of money. She didn't have
to go out and steal or sell her
body to support her habit."
Friedman viewed Joplin as a
fugitive from emotion. "A doc-
tor who saw Janis," she re-
called, "thought it was extreme-
ly significant that she shot up
after her concerts, that she
would shut off her feelings at
the times when she should feel
most gratified."
Friedman remembered being
told by a one-time lover of
Janis' that the singer would
sometimes jump out of bed aft-
er sex and shoot up. "One of
the times she did that he asked
her, 'What are you doing that
for?" She answered, 'What else
is there to do?'"
Once Friedman had a cough-
ing fit while talking to Joplin,
and said "I've got to see a doc-
tor and give up these cigar-
ettes." Janis smiled, and re-
marked, "Don't worry about
it. You only live once, so live."
Joplin then sank into a chair,
her expression becoming som-
ber, and said, "Maybe you
should get me a doctor who spe-
cializes in escapism."
Janis was always nervous be-
fore concerts, fearful that her
audiences wouldn't respond
with enough love. "I think,"
said Friedman, "that the force
that drives certain performers
to play music on stage in order
to get love and acceptance from
a crowd is the same force that
makes those people take

drugs."
When asked whether drugs
helped Joplin in her perform-
ing in any way, Friedman ans-
wered, "I never heard any-
body play or sing better stoned.
You may have heard that Janis
drank before she went on
stage, but that isn't very signifi-
cant because she drank all
day anyway."
"In 1970," Friedman said,
"she faced the fact that she
was in very serious trouble be-
cause of her drinking. She went
to see a doctor, but anybody's
who's ambivalent about their
self-destructiveness pulls away
from helping themselves; or
wants to have somebody do it
for them.
"It's possible that if she
hadn't died, she could have hit
bottom and pulled herself out.
"She made suicide threats,
and she threatened to go the
way she did go, but I don't
think she committed suicide
consciously. Of course, she was
committing suicide every day
of her life.
"I'm not certain, she con-
tinued that alcohol use and the
use of illegal drugs is really
that much more prevalent in
the rock world than in other
strata of society. It is, though,
much more visible in the rock
world.
"Wall St., for example, is a
roaring alcoholic ward. In New
'York at almost any media level,
cocaine is very in now. And
my understanding is that the
profession with the highest rate
of alcoholism is the clergy."

Page Five
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
THEATRE PROGRAM announces
AUDITIONS
3 for
Black Theatre Showcase production of
"The Sty of the Blind Pig"
by Philip Hayes Deen
i
y ~October 1, 2,4-4 p~m. u
v Frieze Bldg. Rm.2515
Eastern Michigan University
PRESENTS
Ti
BACIHMAN-TURNER
OVERDRIVE
WITH
BOB SEGER
VIDF ENTON AnnArborSur BOWEN FIELD HOUSE
SUNDAY, OCT. 13-8 P.M.
TICKETS $5.00 & $6.00
Available at: McKenny Union, EMU; Hudsons at Briar-
wood; Hudsons Westland.
a Brass Rina Production
Satyajit Ray's 1959
THE MUSIC ROOM
Ray is a student of people and their changing-and hopefully
growing-personalities in this film. A man of the upper class is
gradually confronted with modern values and styles that threat-
en him and everything he owns-of which the music room is the
prize possession. Music by Ravi Shankar.
THURS.:OUTCAST OF THE ISLANDS
FRI.: Mae West's i'M NO ANGEL
ADM. ONLY $1
TOIGT t7 &9 ARCHITECTURE AUD.
~ -

Janis JoJ)iII

r--

breezy cheezy loaf
A tangy main dish for c o o
Fall evenings, it's economizal,
quick, and best of all, easy to
fix:
1 cup chopped onion
%/4 cup chopped green penpt r
1-8 oz. can tomato sauce
2 beaten eggsj
4 oz. Cheddar (American)
cheese, or any other kind
you like (that's about 1 cup)
1 cup bream crumbs (about s
11/4 bread slices - now you f
know what to do with the 1
bread ends)I
1 teaspoon saltf
dash pepper
little paprika
pinch celery seed (or a little1
of the real thing chopped) 1
1/4 teaspoon thyme (optional)
1I lbs. ground beef4
lb. ground pork (optional,
but good)t
Cook onion and green pepper
in boiling water until tender;1
drain. In a bowl, stir togetherc
onion and green pepper, tomato'
sauce, eggs, cheese, breadr
crumbs and other seasonings.
Add ground meats, mix well.
Shape into baking dish. Bake at
350 for about 1-V1 hours (to
cook pork completely) or until
cheese on the top starts to
brown. Serves 8-10.
This can also be shaded into
two smaller loaves and cooked,
one for now, one for later

Preheat oven to 400.
Mix milk and flour well. heat,.
stirring constantly and let boil
for two minutes. Add salt, pep-
per and nutmeg to taste.
Separate eggs. Add yolks to
flour and milk sauce (Bezcamel
sauce).
Beat whites until stiff in a
large bowl using a wire whisk.
Pour Bechamel and yolks in the
egg whites. Mix gently with a!
spoon, mixing the cheese at the
same time. Don't hurry but mix
thoroughly.
A souffle dish should be oven
proof, and at least three inches
deep and six across. Butter it
generously and fill it with the
mixture.
Bake for 25 minutes and serve
at once.

Into a large mixing bowl turn
the cake mix, pudding mix,
sour cream, oil, water and eggs.
With an electric mixed at md-t
ium speed, beat about 5 mi-
utes. Stir in chocolate pieces.
Torn into a greased 12-cup flut-
ed or swirled tube pan. Bake
in a preheated 350-degree oven
until a cake tester inserted in
center comes out without a n v
batter clinging to it - 1 hour.
Place on wire rack to cool for
10 minutes. Loosen edges and
turn out; cool completely. Serve
with whipped cream or vanilla
ice cream.
F RI.-SA T.
RECORD'S
PAUL
GEREMIA

AP Photo
Paycheck, a fleet-footed turkey from Worthington, Minn., is
off to a good start ahead of Ruby Begonia II, of Cuero, Texas
in the final heat of the Great Gobbler Gallop. Paycheck lost
Sunday's race at Cuero, Texas but went home with the
Traveling Turkey Trophy of Tumultuious Triumphs because
of better elapsed time for the two-heat race. Ruby Begonia II,
stands flat-footed (right) as Dennis Van Beest urges Pay-
check on with a noisy tambourine.
. 1

I

ALL
YOU CAN
EAT

c

Mounds of Spaghetti, Coleslaw,
and Garlic Bread
Every Wednesday-4 :30-10 P.M.
Huron Hotel & Lounge
124 Pearl 483-1771 Ypsi.

... funky voice,
strong rhythm,
exceptional
performer.
He is good."
-Crawdoddy
"Geremia's album
best of the year
so for. I really
can't imagine
anything topping
it."
-Ann Arbor News
NEXT WEEK-

I

Blue Grass Guitar Lessons
CHARLIE ROEHRIG, of the RFD BOYS,
will be taking appointments for private

I

I

w

",

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